Moby Dick; or the whale

Moby Dick; or the whale

3.8 38
by Mr Herman Melville
     
 

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Moby Dick (Moby-Dick, or, The Whale Moby-Dick or Sperm) is a novel by American writer Herman Melville published in 1851, whose title comes from the nickname given to a great white whale in the center of the plot.
Melville, who was also sailor, like most of the heroes of his novels, is inspired by real events:
Sperm whales continued all wore name. [Ref.…  See more details below

Overview

Moby Dick (Moby-Dick, or, The Whale Moby-Dick or Sperm) is a novel by American writer Herman Melville published in 1851, whose title comes from the nickname given to a great white whale in the center of the plot.
Melville, who was also sailor, like most of the heroes of his novels, is inspired by real events:
Sperm whales continued all wore name. [Ref. needed]
the sinking of the whaling ship Essex, which sank in 1820 after facing a large sperm whale 3,700 miles off the coast of South America. One of the surviving sailors, Owen Chase, consigned this adventure in a book which appeared in 1821.
The existence of a white whale, in the 1830s, often seen near the Chilean island of Mocha. Riddled with harpoons, Mocha Dick regularly attacked whalers. But unlike the drama of Essex, no hint in the novel or in the correspondence of the author authenticates this reference, despite testing JN Reynolds called Mocha Dick or The White Whale of the Pacific (1838).
Writing the book was begun in 1850 The novel was first published in London in October 1851 under the title The Whale (The Sperm) -. Edition was incomplete and that the title was not the one intended by Melville. It is shortly after, when its U.S. release in November of the same year, the book became known as Moby-Dick; or, The Whale (Moby-Dick or Sperm)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781500634889
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
07/28/2014
Pages:
466
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.94(d)

Meet the Author

Herman Melville was born on August 1, 1819 Pearl Street, southeast of Manhattan (New York), died September 28, 1891 in New York, is a novelist, essayist and American poet.
Virtually forgotten by all until his death, was rediscovered Melville in the 1920s through his masterpiece Moby-Dick. It is now considered one of the greatest figures in American literature.
The formative years
Herman Melville is the third of eight children (and second son) Maria Gansevoort and Allan Melvill (without the "e"). Mother's side, his ancestors were of Dutch origin patricians (one of them, General Peter Gansevoort, a hero of the American Revolution). The paternal side is a line of Scottish traders. Allan's father, Major Thomas Melvill, also played a glorious role in the War of Independence. Allan Melvill matter of France "new" products. In 1826, the U.S. economy is entering a period of stagnation, and the father of the writer suffered the brunt of the British competition. His business périclitant, it must borrow more and more important to her stepfather, Peter Gansevoort, who becomes the financial support of the family. Between 1820 and 1830, the family moved three times before settling in 1830 near the Gansevoort, in Albany, the state capital of New York, where Allan Melvill working as an employee in a factory fur.
During a trip to New York in December 1831, Allan Melvill, who tries to start a new business which it would be the boss, contracted pneumonia. He died January 28, 1832. Both seniors, Gansevoort (b. 1815) and Herman then leave the Albany college. The first, assisted by Uncle Peter, opens a trade in skins and furs that will improve for three years (at that time, he added an "e" to his name, the whole family gets). The second is thirteen years old, employed at the New York State Bank, whose uncle Peter is a director.

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Moby Dick or The Whale 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey so i dont know if you hav realized but most of the other cats have found mates
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He padded to the top of a moonlit hill and sat there, wrapping his tail over his paws. He closed his eyes, going over his recent dream and his kithood memories in his mind.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
At Amazon, you have to have purchased a product before you can review it. Look at these 'reviews' and you can see that that's a good idea.
ShawnM More than 1 year ago
There are quite a few editions of Moby Dick being published, and I've seen most of them, but this edition is one of the best: the illustrations are simple yet beautifully arty; the typeset is kool; and it has a neat cover! Well, I dont know about most book collectors, but I judge books by their covers!
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PixieChild More than 1 year ago
Should have read this years ago. The book itself was not in as good condition as stated, but still an excellent book to read.
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E_Caine More than 1 year ago
Moby Dick is one of those rare novels that captures a particular historical moment while, at the same time, remaining timeless. Gripping drama, tense action, compelling characters and a setting so rarely glimpsed in history - the period in America between the Revolutionary and the Civil Wars. It was a time when America was discovering itself as the characters are discovering themselves. And it was the height of an industry of which, like slavery, we are all still a little ashamed. Whaling was a profitable, dangerous, and engaging occupation for a young man in those days. But when the Captain of your ship is obsessed with taking vengeance on his tormentor it would be an experience you could never forget. Assuming, of course, that you survived. Complicated, compelling, beautifully written, and always a classic, Moby-Dick is a must-read for any American lover of literature.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Who am I to criticize Melville? But after reading, and chuckling, over some of my peer reader's reviews, I'm compelled to balance stars. I'm neither a critic nor literary scholar. I'm just someone who loves good literature, classic or not. Granted, Moby is long and detailed, but I contend it's all necessary and part of the story's framework. The themes are skillfully packaged in abstruse metaphors. And I agree that I had to use lexical aids to get through some of the dated vernacular. I even put down my cheap paperback for a Norton critical edition, but it was worth it. The language is beautiful and artistic. Read a benign chapter to a child and watch their expressions change as their imagination takes over their visage. Moby provides insight into today's archetypes found in pop-culture's 'Spongebob' or 'Pirates of the Caribbean'. Perhaps Moby isn't for everyone. Those who aren't interested in ages long past, historically accurate depictions of bloody exploitation, or ocular criticism of social hypocrisy, should probably stick to the bestseller lists. Entertain your brain. Every chapter is a piece of Melville's puzzle. When taken holistically, it all fits. Slow your monkey mind. Mindfully read. Open your eyes. Moby is still relevant today, especially to you good folks who think you live on that fabled 'City on the Hill'.