The Mockingbird Parables: Transforming Lives through the Power of Story

( 9 )

Overview

The Mockingbird Parables takes readers on an inspiring and engaging journey through Harper Lee’s beloved 1960 literary masterpiece, introducing each character through the lens of faith. The enigmatic Boo Radley as an allegorical representation of God, “the divine, mysterious neighbor” who watches over, protects, and longs to know his children personally. The hero, Atticus Finch, as a model of faith, integrity, and even parenting. The main character, Scout Finch, and what she ...
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The Mockingbird Parables: Transforming Lives through the Power of Story

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Overview

The Mockingbird Parables takes readers on an inspiring and engaging journey through Harper Lee’s beloved 1960 literary masterpiece, introducing each character through the lens of faith. The enigmatic Boo Radley as an allegorical representation of God, “the divine, mysterious neighbor” who watches over, protects, and longs to know his children personally. The hero, Atticus Finch, as a model of faith, integrity, and even parenting. The main character, Scout Finch, and what she might teach us about the role of women in church and society.
The Mockingbird Parables compels us to ask the often-ignored questions: Do we truly love our neighbors? Are we building community? Are we influencing society for the better? By illuminating the parallels between Christian faith and Lee’s masterpiece, The Mockingbird Parables reaffirms the magnitude of a novel perhaps more relevant today than ever before. Tyndale House Publishers Tyndale House Publishers
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  • The Mockingbird Parables
    The Mockingbird Parables  

What People Are Saying

Daniel Taylor
Matt Litton’s story-laced and deeply insightful reflections call us to be as wise and courageous in putting our own values into action as do the characters in Harper Lee’s timeless novel.
Scot McKnight
You’ll be enchanted by The Mockingbird Parables...
Daniel Taylor
Matt Litton’s story-laced and deeply insightful reflections call us to be as wise and courageous in putting our own values into action as do the characters in Harper Lee’s timeless novel.
Daniel Taylor, English Professor, Bethel University
Scot McKnight
You’ll be enchanted by The Mockingbird Parables...
Scot McKnight, Religious Studies Professor, North Park University
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781414348346
  • Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/19/2010
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 911,191
  • Product dimensions: 5.84 (w) x 11.04 (h) x 0.16 (d)

Table of Contents

To Kill a Mockingbird and the Power of Parables 1

The Parable of Boo Radley: Discovering Our Divine Mysterious Neighbor 15

The Parable of House Fires and Church Collections: Our Responsibility to Care for the Neighborhood 35

The Parable of Scout Finch: The Role of Women in Faith 57

The Parable of Miss Maudie's Azaleas: Our Responsibility to Care for Creation 81

The Parable of Atticus Finch: The Model of Christian Courage 99

The Parable of the Missionary Tea: Our Responsibility to the Global Neighborhood Begins at Home 121

The Parable of the Great Depression: The Christian Ethic of Financial Responsibility 139

The Parable of Tom Robinson: How Compassion Can Overcome Our Differences 157

The Parable of Raising Jem and Scout Finch: Parenting for Compassion 179

The Parable of the Last Word: Communicating to Build Community 199

Afterword: Compassion in Action 221

About the Author 224

Parable Reflections 225

Acknowledgments 229

Notes 231

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 8 of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 21, 2010

    Nice Book About Living the Mockingbird Life

    The Mockingbird Parables takes on the classic story of To Kill A Mockingbird and focuses in on the characters and life in the story's town of Maycomb, Alabama. Author Matt Litton uses different scenes and character activities to exemplify various Biblical traits, drawing conclusions on how we should (or shouldn't) view and treat our families, neighbors, communities, and the world at large. This is a nice book that draws from a remarkable story for observations about what's truly important in life and ways we as a society should express our love for mankind and community. Some of the parables are obvious, other less so, but all in all quite good at using the story of To Kill A Mockingbird to remind us of what it means to care for others. That being said, I did have a couple of issues with the way the observations and conclusions were presented.

    The observations he makes about the different scenes in the books and how they might relate to parables of Christianity seem to be -- for the most part -- well founded and thought out. If the book consisted solely of those, it would be just fine. It even includes plenty of the author's viewpoint -- especially concerning Scout, whom he compares to his sister. These anecdotes are also very nice and useful to the discussion. The book seems to go off the mark, however, when taking those observations and comparing them to his observations of current (especially church) society, which is not nearly as inclusive or thought out. The author seems to be coming from the viewpoint of one or two denominations that seem to have a lot of problems, and making his points with these "parables" as if all churches have these same problems. However, my church has already addressed many of these issues and I'm becoming increasingly annoyed reading these rants that seem to paint the entire church community with such broad strokes. And my church is not the only one; I know of several friends and acquaintances who partner with churches that truly reach out beyond their walls to impact the community and the world around them. They do not all conform to the attitudes Litton seems to generalize in the book, but they are barely mentioned in the book, and I found it a little off-putting.

    I also noted a couple of times where Litton, in an effort to make a point or portray a parallel he is trying to discuss, describes certain scenes in the book as unfolding in a slightly different manner than the scenes are actually written. At one point he remarks that the story ends with Scout falling asleep while listening to her father read; the actual scene, however, ends somewhat after that. In another instance, Litton describes Boo Radley running out of his house in the climax scene with the kitchen knife that eventually killed Bob Ewell; a chapter later he describes the same scene with Bob Ewell sneaking up on Jem and Scout with that kitchen knife already in hand. Little things like that may go unnoticed to someone who hasn't read the book recently, but if those scenes already stand out in one's mind, the discrepancies in description are fairly obvious.

    However, overall it is a good book, and one that will help you not only ponder your own world view, but also want to take a deeper look into the life of To Kill A Mockingbird, which is itself a great read.

    (NOTE: I received this book free from the Tyndale Blog Network. I was not required to write a positive review.)

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 22, 2010

    great for all ages

    I first read "To Kill a Mockingbird" in 9th grade. My teacher was Kelly, a woman who definitely inspired me to become a high school English teacher. I remember watching the movie in class, discussing the characters and motives. I also remember that it was one of the few books that everyone I knew I had read - even my parents had read "To Kill a Mockingbird." So there were all of these perspectives on the book and influences and characters. You don't find that kind of wide-spread readership in most books today.

    Matt Litton wrote "The Mockingbird Parables" to help draw out Christian themes within the pages of this classic. There is so much to be taught (and learned) about Boo Radley as a God-figure, always watching us. We can draw on the descriptions of the community within this book to help us build a faith community of believers that help one another out in times of need.

    I am unlike Litton; I haven't picked up a copy of TKAM since that first time. I read it in class like everyone else, never stopping to pick it up again (or having the time since I was reading other books for other classes). Although I remember the story better than many books I've read (and I've read a LOT). Probably because it is a profound story that goes beyond the overlaying plot of racism and false accusations. It tells a story about community, coming of age, and too many parables to count, even if we didn't see them in our first reading of the book.

    Matt Litton
    I think Litton did a great job breaking this book into smaller chapters and talking points. There is a lot of information and many "parables" to look upon. What a wonderful resource for a middle or high school small group where the readers may be reading this book. It also speaks to adults, brings about a nostalgia from their childhoods and ties it together with how to bring these lessons to their daily lives. A great read for all ages.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 18, 2010

    Inspiring

    In The Mockingbird Parables, the author takes a deep look into Lee's novel and examines each character, drawing allegorical conclusions that help us learn many a great lesson from this book. As you read this book, you will find yourself analyzing your own life and the difference you are making in society.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2012

    Rockpaw

    No i dont

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2012

    Perlstep

    Picked her way through thr rubble. "Im from capitolclan. I survived. I hide in the wods until i saw the shadow cats leaving. I will miss everyone." Went off to grieve for the lost cats.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2012

    Soccerstar to snowfire

    Hello. Are u a she or a tom

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2012

    Himale

    I would like to be a warrior. Thanks!
    The female Loudfur

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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