Mockingjay (Hunger Games Series #3)

( 27235 )

Overview


The third book in Suzanne Collins's phenomenal and worldwide bestselling Hunger Games trilogy is now available in paperback.

"My name is Katniss Everdeen. Why am I not dead? I should be dead."

Katniss Everdeen, girl on fire, has survived, even though her home has been destroyed. There are rebels. There are new leaders. A revolution is unfolding.

District 13 has come out of the shadows and is plotting to overthrow the Capitol. Though she's long...

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Mockingjay (Hunger Games Series #3)

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Overview


The third book in Suzanne Collins's phenomenal and worldwide bestselling Hunger Games trilogy is now available in paperback.

"My name is Katniss Everdeen. Why am I not dead? I should be dead."

Katniss Everdeen, girl on fire, has survived, even though her home has been destroyed. There are rebels. There are new leaders. A revolution is unfolding.

District 13 has come out of the shadows and is plotting to overthrow the Capitol. Though she's long been a part of the revolution, Katniss hasn't known it. Now it seems that everyone has had a hand in the carefully laid plans but her.

The success of the rebellion hinges on Katniss's willingness to be a pawn, to accept responsibility for countless lives, and to change the course of the future of Panem. To do this, she must put aside her feelings of anger and distrust. She must become the rebels' Mockingjay - no matter what the cost.

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  • Suzanne Collins speaks about reading and writing
    Suzanne Collins speaks about reading and writing  

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Young Katniss Everdeen has survived the dreaded Hunger Games not once, but twice, but even now she can find no relief. In fact, the dangers seem to be escalating: President Snow has declared an all-out war on Kattnis, her family, her friends, and all the oppressed people of District 12. The thrill-packed final installment of Suzanne Collins' Hunger Games trilogy will keep young hearts pounding.
Publishers Weekly
This concluding volume in Collins's Hunger Games trilogy accomplishes a rare feat, the last installment being the best yet, a beautifully orchestrated and intelligent novel that succeeds on every level. At the end of Catching Fire, Katniss had been dramatically rescued from the Quarter Quell games; her fellow tribute, Peeta, has presumably been taken prisoner by the Capitol. Now the rebels in District 13 want Katniss (who again narrates) to be the face of the revolution, a propaganda role she's reluctant to play. One of Collins's many achievements is skillfully showing how effective such a poster girl can be, with a scene in which Katniss visits the wounded, cameras rolling to capture (and retransmit) her genuine outrage at the way in which war victimizes even the noncombatants. Beyond the sharp social commentary and the nifty world building, there's a plot that doesn't quit: nearly every chapter ends in a reversal-of-fortune cliffhanger. Readers get to know characters better, including Katniss's sister and mother, and Plutarch Heavensbee, former Head Gamemaker, now rebel filmmaker, directing the circus he hopes will bring down the government, a coup possible precisely because the Capitol's residents are too pampered to mount a defense. "In return for full bellies and entertainment," he tells Katniss, explaining the Latin phrase panem et circenses, "people had given up their political responsibilities and therefore their power." Finally, there is the romantic intrigue involving Katniss, Peeta and Gale, which comes to a resolution that, while it will break some hearts, feels right. In short, there's something here for nearly every reader, all of it completely engrossing. Ages 12-up. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Michele C. Hughes
Another page-turner, the final book in the "Hunger Games" trilogy packs even more suspense and horror than the first two. This time the stakes are higher, as Katniss and the rebels in District 13 fight for their freedom from the evil Capitol forces that seek to annihilate them. Again Katniss finds herself in the position of reluctant leader, and due to a constant internal monologue, the reader knows what Katniss thinks and feels about the terrifying, bleak world in which she finds herself. Her single-minded goal is to rescue her dear friend, Peeta, who is imprisoned in the Capitol. Meanwhile, she continues to explore her feelings for Gale, a childhood friend who may become more to her. She struggles to navigate a world in which one adult after another seeks to use her for their own purposes, yet she finds ways to accomplish her own plans. More than the other volumes, this story is dark and horrifying, with some particularly gruesome scenes as the rebels infiltrate the Capitol and encounter several waves of grotesque weaponry. Powerful descriptions of the Capitol's excesses are a brilliant commentary on the decadence of society and the diminished value placed on human life—in Panem and in contemporary society as well. By the end, it is clear that everyone loses in war, even the winners. Bleakness competes with the seeds of hope, and ambiguity prevents a definitive reading of what measure of hope remains. In a high school classroom, this book could spark discussions about patriotism, materialism, vanity, self-sacrifice, loyalty, the influence of television and the media, human dignity, war and many other significant issues. Reviewer: Michele C. Hughes
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—The final installment of Suzanne Collins's trilogy sets Katniss in one more Hunger Game, but this time it is for world control. While it is a clever twist on the original plot, it means that there is less focus on the individual characters and more on political intrigue and large scale destruction. That said, Carolyn McCormick continues to breathe life into a less vibrant Katniss by showing her despair both at those she feels responsible for killing and and at her own motives and choices. This is an older, wiser, sadder, and very reluctant heroine, torn between revenge and compassion. McCormick captures these conflicts by changing the pitch and pacing of Katniss's voice. Katniss is both a pawn of the rebels and the victim of President Snow, who uses Peeta to try to control Katniss. Peeta's struggles are well evidenced in his voice, which goes from rage to puzzlement to an unsure return to sweetness. McCormick also makes the secondary characters—some malevolent, others benevolent, and many confused—very real with distinct voices and agendas/concerns. She acts like an outside chronicler in giving listeners just "the facts" but also respects the individuality and unique challenges of each of the main characters. A successful completion of a monumental series.—Edith Ching, University of Maryland, College Park
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—Following her subversive second victory in the Games, this one composed of winners from past years, Katniss has been adopted by rebel factions as their symbol for freedom and becomes the rallying point for the districts in a desperate bid to take down the Capitol and remove President Snow from power. But being the Mockingjay comes with a price as Katniss must come to terms with how much of her own humanity and sanity she can willingly sacrifice for the cause, her friends, and her family. Collins is absolutely ruthless in her depictions of war in all its cruelty, violence, and loss, leaving readers, in turn, repulsed, shocked, grieving and, finally, hopeful for the characters they've grown to empathize with and love. Mockingjay is a fitting end of the series that began with The Hunger Games (2008) and Catching Fire (2009) and will have the same lasting resonance as William Golding's Lord of the Flies and Stephen King's The Stand. However, the book is not a stand-alone; readers do need to be familiar with the first two titles in order to appreciate the events and characters in this one.—Jane Henriksen Baird, Anchorage Public Library, AK
Katie Roiphe
Mockingjay is not as impeccably plotted as The Hunger Games, but none­theless retains its fierce, chilly fascination. At its best the trilogy channels the political passion of 1984, the memorable violence of A Clockwork Orange, the imaginative ambience of The Chronicles of Narnia and the detailed inventiveness of Harry Potter. The specifics of the dystopian universe, and the fabulous pacing of the complicated plot, give the books their strange, dark charisma.
—The New York Times
Mary Quattlebaum
Nothing is black or white in this gripping, complex tale, including the angry, self-doubting heroine…This dystopic-fantasy series, which began in 2008, has had such tremendous crossover appeal that teens and parents may discover themselves vying for—and talking about—the family copy of Mockingjay. And there's much to talk about because this powerful novel pierces cheery complacency like a Katniss-launched arrow.
—The Washington Post
From the Publisher

Praise for Mockingjay:
#1 USA Today Bestseller
#1 New York Times Bestseller
#1 Wall Street Journal Bestseller
#1 Publishers Weekly Bestseller
A New York Times Notable Children's Book of 2010
A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice
A 2010 Booklist Editors' Choice
A 2010 Kirkus Best Book of the Year
A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2010
“Fans will be happy to hear that Mockingjay is every bit as complex and imaginative as Hunger Games and Catching Fire."
-Entertainment Weekly
“Suspenseful... Collins' fans, grown-ups included, will race to the end."
-USA Today
“At its best the trilogy channels the political passion of 1984, the memorable violence of A Clockwork Orange, the imaginative ambience of The Chronicles of Narnia and the detailed inventiveness of Harry Potter."
-New York Times Book Review
“Unfolding in Collins' engaging, intelligent prose and assembled into chapters that end with didn't-see-that-coming cliffhangers, this finale is every bit the pressure cooker of its forebears. [Mockingjay] is nearly as shocking, and certainly every bit as original and thought provoking, as The Hunger Games. Wow."
-Los Angeles Times
* “This concluding volume in Collins's Hunger Games trilogy accomplishes a rare feat, the last installment being the best yet, a beautifully orchestrated and intelligent novel that succeeds on every level."
-Publishers Weekly, starred review
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780439023511
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/24/2010
  • Series: Hunger Games Series , #3
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 27,351
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • Lexile: 800L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Suzanne Collins

Suzanne Collins is the author of the groundbreaking Hunger Games trilogy for young adults: The Hunger Games, Catching Fire, and Mockingjay. She is also the author of an upcoming picture book, Year of the Jungle, and the New York Times bestselling Underland Chronicles series for middle grade readers, which started with Gregor the Overlander. Suzanne lives with her family in Connecticut. You can find her online at suzannecollinsbooks.com.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 27235 )
Rating Distribution

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4 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 27544 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 23, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Excellent read

    I loved reading this wonderful book! It is a story that keeps you entertained for hours.

    361 out of 507 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2010

    Good series, great characters, but fails on the last book

    Simply put, why would you kill Prim? Kill Haymitch, Kill Kat's mother, kill even Peeta but why would you kill innocent Prim who is the only one there that would give Kat sound advice.

    The last book takes so many wicked turns that in the end you wish that you could rewrite the book and fix how all the characters finally fall into place.

    This book fell short with the death of Prim, Kat finally ending up with Peeta, Gale becoming just as bad as the enemies, and Kat just becoming a vegetable to walk around and can no longer be happy.

    She is suppose to be happy in the end not this depressed maniac. In the end you are wishing she would just end her life to end her misery.

    340 out of 1218 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2010

    WOW

    The only part of this book I loved was the epilogue. I knew that the final book of this series was never going to be sunshine and rainbows, but I never thought that it would be so depressing and discouraging. I finished this book feeling really rundown. It almost felt like a copout, like Suzanne Collins was trying to make a statement or just couldn't edit herself. The story was random and jumpy. The first book was amazing, the second was really good, but I think the third was just ok. Overall I feel like it had some really good ideas and plot lines, but it just didn't live up to the first two books.

    171 out of 264 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 4, 2010

    Great book, but a lazy ending

    This series was well-written... right up to the end. I still recommend reading it. You can't help but root for Katniss and Peeta. But, Collins clearly can't take the presure of writing the final chapter. No spoilers here, and die-hard Hunger Games fans will read it anyway. But, very dissappointing.

    134 out of 223 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 29, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great end to a great series

    So, alot of people who have read this book were dissapointed by it. They expected more, it didn't live up to the hype, ect. ect. But I thought it was a great end to the trilogy. Katniss was in a state of mental unstability--but honestly, who wouldn't? She has gone through so much in the past two books and this one, that while she is SO strong, everyone has their breaking point and throughout the book Katniss was pushed to hers. She saw loved ones die and see the pain the Capitol put them through. The fact that by the end of the book she was still functioning is an accomplishment in my book.

    As for the rest of the book it was filled with emotion and action. It was a bit fast paced and some things seemed to happen so fast and unclear, but besides that it was a truely amazing book. I recommend it to everyone and all Hunger Games fans.

    123 out of 155 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 27, 2010

    Utterly Disappointing.

    There's so many things to say about this book...i'll start off with the fact that i've never been so disappointed at a conclusion in all my life. I expected more. I really did. The whole book focuses on the war and Peeta is absent in more ways then you think going into the book. He was my favorite character and not ONCE during the entire book did i actually feel like he was really there. That was the worst thing in the book.
    While entertaining, the book was filled with nothing but misery, boredom, and disappointment. The only thing that kept me flipping the pages was curiosity. I wouldn't necessarily say that SC ruined the series, but she definitely ruined Mockingjay. The whole thing was introduction, rising action, rising action, rising action, rising action, rising action...oh, wait is it the climax? I stopped paying attention because i got bored. Oh, guess it's the resolution now. Oh, the resolution's only two pages? Well then.

    91 out of 152 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2010

    not good

    I really enjoyed the first two books but the last 100 or so pages ruined the entire series for me. I would almost have rather left the series unfinished.

    85 out of 160 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 1, 2010

    Weird and Disappointing

    As I was reading this book all the characters felt like complete strangers to me. It was like the author was not the same person who wrote the other two books. It was very slow reading and the plot was-well there was no plot. There was no emotion from Katniss. She was indifferent to Gale, Peeta, and Haymitch. I wanted her to want to be with Peeta or Gale, but she didn't really WANT anything in this book. The girl on fire was not the same girl in this book. In the end, it felt like she just sat down and settled.

    79 out of 124 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 6, 2010

    more from this reviewer

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    An Emotional Rollercoaster that Will Leave You Drained and In Awe

    I finished Mockingjay just last night and having just re-read some of my favorite parts, I have to say that I'm feeling completely drained. Both mentally and emotionally. The closing book in the trilogy is a whirlwind of everything that made the previous two books brilliant, but this one holds a much more terrifying and foreboding tone.

    Every twist, every surprise will tear you apart in some way. It's really difficult for me to describe it if you haven't read the book, but the characters go through hell and back here.

    Where The Hunger Games introduced us to this world where children were forced to fight to the death and Catching Fire lit the spark of a rebellion, Mockingjay becomes a war zone. Happy endings are hard to come by and there is a massacre around every corner, making this book so much darker than the last two.

    Instead of going into the war zone of an arena, we are catapulted into a real war zone with bombs, gunfire, and death. The politics of it all leaves us unable to trust anything we learn. Everyone has motives for doing what they are doing, but it's a matter of figuring just what is right that is the most difficult part. All this leads to so much inner turmoil for Katniss and a box of Kleenex may be needed to make it to the end. I know I was tearing up every few chapters.

    Many characters face obstacles that we could never imagine and minor characters take on roles we could only have hoped for. The lies, deceit, hatred, anguish, despair, heartache, joy, and even hope take their toll. There were a few times when I just had to take a break and pull myself together because the book was just wiping me out. The death, the carnage, and the emotional upheaval are a lot to take. Collins never lets us forget that we are in a war zone with Katniss and in war, there are no winners. Fighting a war is not easy and there will be casualties and consequences, lives lost and lives destroyed.

    The war zone mentality detracts from the Team Peeta/Team Gale atmosphere that lingered in the last two books, but the relationship between Peeta/Katniss/Gale is still explored with insurmountable care and delicacy. With all that has happened, one can only hope that all of them can find some sort of peace.

    Suzanne Collins did something special with this series. Not only is the world of THG absolutely captivating, it is thought-provoking and emotional. Mockingjay is a heart-wrenching finale that will leave readers thinking about it long after turning that final page. The rollercoaster ride of emotions left me drained from the intensity of a world where a girl lit the spark that ignited a nation.

    Opening line: I stare down at my shoes, watching as a fine layer of ash settles on the worn leather. ~ pg. 3

    Favorite line: Closing my eyes doesn't help. Fire burns brighter in the darkness. ~ pg. 352

    78 out of 82 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 3, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Dissapointed

    The first two books in this trilogy were nothing short of fantastic. I was completely engrossed, absorbed and thrilled by them. The story, characters and writing were totally what a bestseller should be.
    But, the last book, not so much. I agree with a previous reviewer who noted it was like another person wrote "Mockingjay". Or the author was rushed or distracted.
    The characters changed to the point of being unrecognizable from the previous books. The story seemed disjointed. The emotion, feeling and sense of purpose of the story dwindled.
    The ending was, to me, a total disappointment. The people I had high hopes for were just dismissed, as if their previous rises to and falls from glory never occurred at all.
    There was no closure or sense of a real ending. No final relief or gasp of emotion that I waited for.
    The book was a good read, but ended like a good read but not up to the fantastic read the first two books were.

    67 out of 94 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2010

    Disappointing

    The first two books of this series had intriguing plot lines and well defined characters that the reader developed relationships with. The third book is a morass of graphic violence, slow-moving and meaningless plotlines and an ending that neither teachers a moral/cultural value nor satisfies the readers need for closure. Collins must have written this for the screenplay she is sure to get and people pay to see meaningless violence.

    63 out of 131 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2012

    The only bad thing is that it ends

    I wish it could go on forever

    57 out of 81 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 29, 2012

    Haters.......

    Stop fussing over the ending.... in fact i think it was FLAWLESS. Showing Bravery, Love, and Emotions. Which is what the series has mainly been about if u haters paid any attention. If u don't like the ending then go and make your own series and have the last book have a happily ever after ending but that was not what this series is about. P.S Your series wouldn't get very far. To the people wondering if you should by this DO because it is soooo worth the money.

    55 out of 82 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 24, 2010

    A must buy.

    The whole book as a whole is great. The first 3/4's are wonderful, riveting pages that will glue you to your seat. But as the ending came along I started to get lost about Katniss's feelings and motives. The ending becomes depressing and doesn't give the resolution I thought the series could have achieved. The action was great and the emotional tears you get from watching Katniss's and Peeta's relation trying to be remade, But in the end I felt cheated of a good ending. Some may see it differently, but I'm going to go read it again to see if I misunderstood something along the way, I only hope I did.

    Otherwise, an awesome book and would recommend it to anyone I know or every will.

    45 out of 59 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2010

    Wonderful Read.

    I started this book on a friday and couldn't put it down until i finished it on sunday. Truly wonderful read! Why does everyone want her to end up with Gale? Peeta is a much more interesting character.

    43 out of 54 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 1, 2010

    Very Disappointing

    I couldn't wait for this book to come out and I am very sorry that it ended an otherwise, great series so badly, Katniss was a basket case, Petta was non-existent through the first half of the book. The story line was very hard to follow.

    38 out of 77 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 27, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    I'm waiting in anxiety!

    This series is deffiantly in my Top 5 favorite book series! The first 2 were amazing! I couldn't put them down! This book will not be one that you will menally throw at a wall (I couldn't do that in real life because I wouldn't dare break one of my books!) this book will be the best one of the series. Hopefully Peeta will be Katniss's choice because to be honest, I really didn't like Gale from the moment I met him. Go Peeta!!

    32 out of 53 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 18, 2010

    Good book, but was an ill fitting ending to the series.

    I have read the past two books and was blown away. I loved the plot, futuristic Panem, and the whole idea of 13 districts and the Hunger Games. When Mockingjay came out I was both excited and sad since it was the last book. When I started to read it I wasn't so psyched about how she was still in love with both Gale and Peeta and was trying to decide which to choose. Katniss becomes the Mockingjay and has to be a symbol for the whole rebel force. It is a tough job and she struggles trying to do it and feels that she isn't helping much because she doesn't get to fight. I liked the scenarios and how district 13 was this secluded militaristic district. I especially liked Boggs. I loved how the simple shoots that were supposed to be like rebel messages (they call them propos) became deadly situations such as the hospital in district 8. I also liked how she got an awesome bow that could take out hovercraft out of the sky. Now the whole pod thing with the capital and everything about the military tactics was really cool. I thought it was fitting for this book to have a "final stand" type theme with the rebels going all out to take the capital down. This was a nice touch and a nice change of pace from the usual love drama. So near the end there is a mission, but I don't want to spoil it. I was very disappointed with the ending. It really let me down and some parts didn't make sense to me. I can't tell the details or I would ruin the book for you. I liked this book, but not as much as the original Hunger Games. I still think it is a great book, but it isn't up to par with the other two. If you haven't picked up the Hunger Games, you should because it is a must-read and this book s good enough to be a book worthy of the hunger games series stamp.

    31 out of 41 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 4, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Gale or Peeta

    Edward or Jacob is so over. It is time to make a choice but this time it is between Gale and Peeta. Personally, I have no idea who she is going to pick but I think I want her to end up with Gale. He's the tall, dark, and handsome boy who she was always meant to be with and has been waiting in the shadows her whole life. Peeta on the other hand is sweet and charming and you cant help but think that maybe just maybe he might be the better choice. Collins does an excellent job of creating a true conflict not only within her characters but within her readers. I have loved the last two books and cant wait for the last. I don't want it to end but I cant wait any longer. Cant wait to see who Katniss chooses and if the rebellion we have all been waiting for will be as epic as I expect it to be.

    31 out of 59 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 5, 2010

    Don't Give Up on the Hunger Games! (Spoilers)

    So I finished this book 4 hours ago and I haven't stopped thinking about it. Like many other reviewers, I found this book emotionally draining, but that hasn't help me from loving it. I wouldn't say that I enjoyed this installment as much as the first (my favorite), though I think it's on par with the second. This book does take a much darker turn, but I think that's what Collins wants the read to see: that after someone suffers through the tragedies that Katniss has, life is irrevocably changed. I was struck by Katniss's final contemplations about Gale: would she have been able to live a happy life with Gale if the Games hadn't happened? I think yes. But the Games have happened and there's no going back. I found the circle of events from The Hunger Games to Mockingjay (Gale first asking Katniss to run away with him from District 12 to her final question about his absense from 12 while she is there)completely tragic. And as much as it killed my fairy-tell loving self to let Gale go and accept Peeta, I think Collins made the right choice: the only realistic choice Katniss could make as her changed,post Hunger Games self. We are supposed to finish The Hunger Games Trilogy hating what evil makes the human race become: I did.

    27 out of 37 people found this review helpful.

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