Model-Driven Software Development with UML and Java

Overview

Aimed at intermediate and final year undergraduate and master's courses, Model-Driven Software Development with UML and Java introduces MDD, MDA and UML and shows how UML can be used to specify, design, verify and implement software systems using an MDA approach.

Structured to follow two lecture courses, one intermediate [UML, MDA, specification, design, model transformations] and one advanced [software engineering of web applications and enterprise information systems], ...

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Overview

Aimed at intermediate and final year undergraduate and master's courses, Model-Driven Software Development with UML and Java introduces MDD, MDA and UML and shows how UML can be used to specify, design, verify and implement software systems using an MDA approach.

Structured to follow two lecture courses, one intermediate [UML, MDA, specification, design, model transformations] and one advanced [software engineering of web applications and enterprise information systems], difficult concepts are illustrated with numerous examples, and exercises with worked solutions are provided throughout.

Comprehensive coverage of UML and MDA including specification, design, validation, model transformations and code generation

Wide range of examples from information systems to reactive and real-time systems

Coverage of web application and enterprise information system development

Coverage of new standards such as QVT and Java EE 5

Extensive study support material [exercises, web links, source code, UML2 Web tool] at cengage.co.uk/lano

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781844809523
  • Publisher: Cengage Delmar Learning
  • Publication date: 7/2/2009
  • Pages: 437
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.70 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Figures xi

List of Tables xix

Preface xxi

1 Model-Driven Development 1

1.1 What is a Model? 2

1.2 Modeling Notations 3

1.3 The Modeling Processes in Software Development 4

1.4 MDA Concepts 7

1.5 Other MDD Approaches 8

1.6 UML Notation 9

1.7 Case Study 1: Sudoku Solver 11

1.8 Case Study 2: Language Translator 12

1.9 Case Study 3: Online Dating Agency 13

1.10 Case Study 4: Telephone System 14

1.11 Case Study 5: Bank Account System 15

1.12 Summary 17

2 The Unified Modeling Language 19

2.1 Use Cases 20

2.2 Class Diagrams 23

2.3 Object Diagrams 36

2.4 State Machines 38

2.5 Interaction Diagrams 46

2.6 Activity Diagrams 52

2.7 Deployment Diagrams 53

2.8 Relationships Between UML Models 54

2.9 Summary 55

Exercises 56

3 Model Constraints 61

3.1 OCL Expressions 62

3.2 Class Diagram Constraints 69

3.3 State Machine Constraints 73

3.4 Use Case Constraints 74

3.5 Sequence Diagram and Real-Time Constraints 75

3.6 Transformation Constraints 81

3.7 Summary 81

Exercises 82

4 Specification Using UML 87

4.1 Introduction 88

4.2 Constructing a System Specification 88

4.3 Translation System Specification 93

4.4 Sudoku Solver Specification 99

4.5 Dating Agency System Specification 101

4.6 Specification of Timing Behavior 104

4.7 Summary 105

Exercises 105

5 Model Validation 109

5.1 Correctness of Models 110

5.2 Class Diagrams 111

5.3 State Machine Diagrams 119

5.4 Sequence Diagrams 123

5.5 Specification Validation Example: Telephone System 127

5.6 Summary 130

Exercises 131

6 Design Techniques 137

6.1 The Design Process 138

6.2 User Interface Design 141

6.3 AlgorithmDesign 143

6.4 Data Respository Design 146

6.5 Design Case Study: Translation System 148

6.6 Design Case Study: Sudoku Solver 152

6.7 Design Patterns 155

6.8 Summary 161

Exercises 162

7 Model Transformations 165

7.1 Types of Model Transformation 166

7.2 Class Diagram Transformations 167

7.3 State Machine Transformations 186

7.4 Sequence Diagram Transformations 196

7.5 Summary 201

Exercises 201

8 Implementation 207

8.1 Translation to Java 208

8.2 Translation to Relational Databases 231

8.3 Implementation of Timing Requirements 235

8.4 Summary 237

Exercises 237

9 System Evolution 243

9.1 Types of Software Evolution 244

9.2 The Software Change Process 245

9.3 Specification Changes 247

9.4 Design and Architecture Changes 248

9.5 Enhancement Case Study: Telephone System 249

9.6 Generalization Case Study: Sudoku Solver 250

9.7 Generalization Case Study: Translation System 252

9.8 Summary 253

Exercises 254

10 Web Application Development 257

10.1 Introduction 258

10.2 Web Application Specification 261

10.3 Web Application Design 263

10.4 Summary 293

Exercises 294

11 Enterprise Information Systems 297

11.1 EIS Architecture and Components 298

11.2 Mortgage Calculator 304

11.3 Property System 305

11.4 Pet Insurance System 308

11.5 Online Bank System 309

11.6 EIS Design Issues 312

11.7 EIS Patterns 314

11.8 Summary 326

Exercises 326

Appendix A Metamodels of UML 331

A.1 Class Diagrams 331

A.2 State Machines 332

A.3 OCL Constraints 335

A.4 Composite and Procedural Actions 336

A.5 Interactions 337

A.6 Java PSM 338

A.7 Relational Database PSM 339

Appendix B Implementation of Enterprise Information Systems 341

B.1 J2EE: Java 2 Enterprise Edition 341

B.2 Session Bean Example: Mortgage Calculator 345

B.3 BMP Entity Bean Example: User 350

B.4 CMP Entity Bean Example: Online Bank 355

B.5 Tool Support 371

B.6 Web Services 372

B.7 Java Enterprise Edition 5 Platform 375

B.8 Summary 377

Appendix C Exercise Solutions 379

C.1 Chapter 2 379

C.2 Chapter 3 383

C.3 Chapter 4 385

C.4 Chapter 5 391

C.5 Chapter 6 395

C.6 Chapter 7 401

C.7 Chapter 8 405

C.8 Chapter 9 409

C.9 Chapter 10 413

C.10 Chapter 11 418

C.11 Projects 421

Glossary 427

References 431

Index 435

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