Model of Human Occupation: Theory and Application / Edition 4

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Overview

Model of Human Occupation, Fourth Edition offers a complete and current presentation of the most widely used model in occupational therapy, and delivers the latest in MOHO theory, research, and application to practice. This authoritative text explores what motivates individuals, how they select occupations and establish everyday routines, how environment influences occupational behavior, and more.

NEW TO THIS EDITION:

  • Case Vignettes that illustrate key concepts that students need to know
  • Case Studies that help students apply the model to practice
  • Chapter on evidence based practice (ch. 25)
  • Chapter on World Health Organization and AOTA practice framework and language links the MOHO model to two widely used frameworks (ch. 27)
  • Photographs of real patients help bring the concepts and cases to life
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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Melissa Sue Dappen, BA, MS, OT (Rush University Medical Center)
Description: This is the fourth edition of a book that outlines the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO), which describes the reasons behind why people perform as they do, and how clinicians can use this model to understand the client's performance so as to most effectively provide services. The previous edition was published in 2002.
Purpose: It "aims to provide an overview of contemporary MOHO theory, application, and research." The book (and the theory) is quite valuable to clinicians and students, as it provides an interesting perspective on treatment which should be, but is not always, obvious to a therapist.
Audience: As with most books on theory and models of practice, this one is targeted primarily at students. However, clinicians can take away valuable resources, specifically from the chapters covering assessment tools, program development, and documentation. The author, as the originator of the model, is a very credible authority.
Features: This book provides an extensive description of MOHO and its application in both practice and in understanding people's performance within the context of their daily lives. The book provides good case examples that apply the material covered in the chapter, examples of MOHO-based assessment that could be helpful for both students' understanding of the application of the model and clinicians' practice, and extensive evidence for the practice of MOHO. One drawback is that the illustrations are difficult to follow (too many arrows) and difficult to see (not enough contrast). The pictures are very small, making it difficult to determine what is happening. Many of the references are out of date. An appendix containing assessment tools would be a nice addition.
Assessment: This is a very useful book for students and clinicians who adhere to the theory and application of MOHO. It is on par with other books in the field (see Christiansen et al., Occupational Therapy: Performance, Participation, and Well-Being (Slack Incorporated, 2005); Cronin and Mandich (2004) Human Development and Performance Throughout the Life Span (Delmar, Cengage Learning, 2004); Matuska and Christiansen, Ways of Living: Adaptive Strategies for Special Needs, 3rd edition (American Occupational Therapy Association, 2004)), and provides an easy-to-read and easy-to-understand description of a model that is both obvious (of course, people perform best when motivated and performing within the context of their normal life) and often forgotten in the context of a hospital setting, classroom, and everywhere that therapy occurs. This edition is better organized than the previous one and it provides updates in the research involving MOHO, the application of MOHO within the ICF and the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework (though the author may have been well advised to hold off on publication until the most recent version of the Framework was published), and a more thorough description of the MOHO Clearinghouse and Web site.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Melissa Sue Dappen, BA, MS, OT(Rush University Medical Center)
Description: This is the fourth edition of a book that outlines the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO), which describes the reasons behind why people perform as they do, and how clinicians can use this model to understand the client's performance so as to most effectively provide services. The previous edition was published in 2002.
Purpose: It "aims to provide an overview of contemporary MOHO theory, application, and research." The book (and the theory) is quite valuable to clinicians and students, as it provides an interesting perspective on treatment which should be, but is not always, obvious to a therapist.
Audience: As with most books on theory and models of practice, this one is targeted primarily at students. However, clinicians can take away valuable resources, specifically from the chapters covering assessment tools, program development, and documentation. The author, as the originator of the model, is a very credible authority.
Features: This book provides an extensive description of MOHO and its application in both practice and in understanding people's performance within the context of their daily lives. The book provides good case examples that apply the material covered in the chapter, examples of MOHO-based assessment that could be helpful for both students' understanding of the application of the model and clinicians' practice, and extensive evidence for the practice of MOHO. One drawback is that the illustrations are difficult to follow (too many arrows) and difficult to see (not enough contrast). The pictures are very small, making it difficult to determine what is happening. Many of the references are out of date. An appendix containing assessment tools would be a nice addition.
Assessment: This is a very useful book for students and clinicians who adhere to the theory and application of MOHO. It is on par with other books in the field (see Christiansen et al., Occupational Therapy: Performance, Participation, and Well-Being (Slack Incorporated, 2005); Cronin and Mandich (2004) Human Development and Performance Throughout the Life Span (Delmar, Cengage Learning, 2004); Matuska and Christiansen, Ways of Living: Adaptive Strategies for Special Needs, 3rd edition (American Occupational Therapy Association, 2004)), and provides an easy-to-read and easy-to-understand description of a model that is both obvious (of course, people perform best when motivated and performing within the context of their normal life) and often forgotten in the context of a hospital setting, classroom, and everywhere that therapy occurs. This edition is better organized than the previous one and it provides updates in the research involving MOHO, the application of MOHO within the ICF and the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework (though the author may have been well advised to hold off on publication until the most recent version of the Framework was published), and a more thorough description of the MOHO Clearinghouse and Web site.
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Contributors
1 Introduction to the Model of Human Occupation 1
2 Human System 9
3 Internal Organization of the Human System for Occupation 27
4 Volition Subsystem 39
5 Habituation Subsystem 63
6 Mind-Brain-Body Performance Subsystem 83
7 Environmental Influences on Occupational Behavior 91
8 Skill in Occupational Performance 113
9 Development of Occupation 139
10 Occupational Dysfunction 155
11 Gathering and Reasoning with Data During Intervention 189
12 Methods of Data Gathering 205
Appendix: Structured Methods of Data Collection Used With the Model of Human Occupation 232
13 Change Making: Principles of Therapeutic Intervention 251
14 Application of the Model in Practice: Case Illustrations 271
15 Program Development 343
Appendix: Bibliography on Programs Using the Model of Human Occupation 371
Appendix: Bibliography 373
Index 379
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