Modern American Short Story Sequences: Composite Fictions and Fictive Communities

Overview

Its status as a genre unto itself often disputed, the short story sequence is a hybrid organism which defies the stereotypes imputed to more conventionally recognized forms of narrative, such as the short story and the novel. By resisting precise definition, it lays down a critical challenge to decode its perplexing formal ambiguities. Modern American Short Story Sequences meets this challenge by suggesting an entirely new means of inquiry. Gathering together eleven new full-length essays, this book is an ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $32.26   
  • New (4) from $32.26   
  • Used (1) from $32.29   
Sending request ...

Overview

Its status as a genre unto itself often disputed, the short story sequence is a hybrid organism which defies the stereotypes imputed to more conventionally recognized forms of narrative, such as the short story and the novel. By resisting precise definition, it lays down a critical challenge to decode its perplexing formal ambiguities. Modern American Short Story Sequences meets this challenge by suggesting an entirely new means of inquiry. Gathering together eleven new full-length essays, this book is an invitation to reconsider the short story sequence as a tradition proper, one formed in the twentieth-century crucible of American literature and one whose very inscrutability continues to provoke intense debate in the realm of fiction studies.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780521172622
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 2/17/2011
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction: The American Short Story Sequence: Definitions and Implications
Henry James's Incipient Poetics of the Short Story Sequence: The Finer Grain (1910) 1
Toomer's Cane as Narrative Sequence 19
Hemingway's In Our Time: The Biography of a Book 35
Wright Writing Reading: Narrative Strategies in Uncle Tom's Children 52
The African-American Voice in Faulkner's Go Down, Moses 76
Meditations on Nonpresence: Re-visioning the Short Story in Eudora Welty's The Wide Net 98
Nine Stories: J. D. Salinger's Linked Mysteries 114
Cheever's Shady Hill: A Suburban Sequence 133
John Updike's Olinger Stories: New Light Among the Shadows 151
Louise Erdrich's Love Medicine: Narrative Communities and the Short Story Sequence 170
From Anderson's Winesburg to Carver's Cathedral: The Short Story Sequence and the Semblance of Community 194
Index 217
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)