Modern Operating Systems / Edition 3

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$156.35
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$115.77
(Save 40%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $50.04
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 74%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (25) from $50.04   
  • New (6) from $89.50   
  • Used (19) from $50.04   

Overview

FEATURES

\
  • NEW—New chapters on computer security, multimedia operating systems, and multiple processor systems.
  • NEW—Extensive coverage of Linux, UNIX®, and Windows 2000™ as examples.
  • NEW—Now includes coverage of graphical user interfaces, multiprocessor operating systems, trusted systems, viruses, network terminals, CD-ROM file systems, power management on laptops, RAID, soft timers, stable storage, fair-share scheduling, three-level scheduling, and new paging algorithms.
  • NEW—Most chapters have a new section on current research on the chapter's topic.
  • NEW—Focus on single-processor computer systems; a new book for a follow-up course on distributed systems is also available from Prentice Hall.
  • NEW—Over 200 references to books and papers published since the first edition.
  • NEW—The Web site for this book contains PowerPoint slides, simulators, figures in various formats, and other teaching aids.

An up-to-date overview of operating systems presented by world-renowned computer scientist and author, Andrew Tanenbaum. This is the first guide to provide balanced coverage between centralized and distributed operating systems. Part I covers processes, memory management, file systems, I/O systems, and deadlocks in single operating system environments. Part II covers communication, synchronization process execution, and file systems in a distributed operating system environment. Includes case studies on UNIX, MACH, AMOEBA, and DOS operating systems.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780136006633
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 12/25/2007
  • Series: GOAL Series
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 1104
  • Sales rank: 748,119
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew S. Tanenbaum has an S.B. degree from M.I.T. and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. He is currently a Professor of Computer Science at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. He was formerly Dean of the Advanced School for Computing and Imaging, an interuniversity graduate school doing research on advanced parallel, distributed, and imaging systems. He was also an Academy Professor of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, which has saved him from turning into a bureaucrat. He also won a prestigious European Research Council Advanced Grant.

In the past, he has done research on compilers, operating systems, networking, local-area distributed systems and wide-area distributed systems that scale to a billion users. His main focus now is doing research on reliable and secure operating systems. These research projects have led to over 140 refereed papers in journals and conferences. Prof. Tanenbaum has also authored or co-authored five books. The books have been translated into languages, ranging from Basque to Thai and are used at universities all over the world.

Prof. Tanenbaum has also produced a considerable volume of software, notably MINIX, a small UNIX clone. It was the direct inspiration for Linux and the platform on which Linux was initially developed. The current version of MINIX, called MINIX 3, is now focused on being an extremely reliable and secure operating system. Prof. Tanenbaum will consider his work done when no computer is equipped with a reset button. and no user has any idea what an operating system crash is. MINIX 3 is an on-going open-source project to which you are invited to contribute. Go to www.minix3.org to download a free copy and find out what is happening.

Prof. Tanenbaum’s Ph.D. students have gone on to greater glory after graduating. He is very proud of them. In this respect he resembles a mother hen.

Tanenbaum is a Fellow of the ACM, a Fellow of the IEEE, and a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has also won numerous scientific prizes from ACM, IEEE, and USENIX. If you are really curious about them, see his page on Wikipedia. He also has two honorary doctorates.

Herbert Bos obtained his master degree from Twente University and his Ph.D. from Cambridge University Computer Laboratory in the UK. Since then, he has worked extensively on dependable and efficient I/O architectures for operating systems like Linux, but also research systems based on MINIX 3. He currently a professor in Systems and Network Security in the department of Computer Science at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. His main research field is that of system security. With his students, he works on novel ways to detect and stop attacks, to analyze and reverse engineer malware, and to take down botnets (malicious infrastructures that may span millions of computers). In 2011, he obtained an ERC Starting Grant for his research on reverse engineering. Several of his students have won the Roger Needham Ph.D. Award for best Ph.D. thesis in systems in Europe.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

PREFACE

The world has changed a great deal since the first edition of this book appeared in 1992. Computer networks and distributed systems of all kinds have become very common. Small children now roam the Internet, where previously only computer professionals went. As a consequence, this book has changed a great deal, too.

The most obvious change is that the first edition was about half on single-processor operating systems and half on distributed systems. I chose that format in 1991 because few universities then had courses on distributed systems and whatever students learned about distributed systems had to be put into the operating systems course, for which this book was intended. Now most universities have a separate course on distributed systems, so it is not necessary to try to combine the two subjects into one course and one book. This book is intended for a first course on operating systems, and as such focuses mostly on traditional single-processor systems.

I have coauthored two other books on operating systems. This leads to two possible course sequences.

Practically-oriented sequence:

  1. Operating Systems Design and Implementation by Tanenbaum and Woodhull
  2. Distributed Systems by Tanenbaum and Van Steen

Traditional sequence:

  1. Modern Operating Systems by Tanenbaum
  2. Distributed Systems by Tanenbaum and Van Steen

The former sequence uses MINIX and the students are expected to experiment with MINIX in an accompanying laboratory supplementing the first course. The latter sequence does not use MINIX. Instead, some small simulators are availablethat can be used for student exercises during a first course using this book. These simulators can be found starting on the author's Web page: cs.vu.nl/~ast/ by clicking on Software and supplementary material for my books.

In addition to the major change of switching the emphasis to single-processor operating systems in this book, other major changes include the addition of entire chapters on computer security, multimedia operating systems, and Windows 2000, all important and timely topics. In addition, a new and unique chapter on operating system design has been added.

Another new feature is that many chapters now have a section on research about the topic of the chapter. This is intended to introduce the reader to modern work in processes, memory management, and so on. These sections have numerous references to the current research literature for the interested reader. In addition, Chapter 13 has many introductory and tutorial references.

Finally, numerous topics have been added to this book or heavily revised. These topics include: graphical user interfaces, multiprocessor operating systems, power management for laptops, trusted systems, viruses, network terminals, CDROM file systems, mutexes, RAID, soft timers, stable storage, fair-share scheduling, and new paging algorithms. Many new problems have been added and old ones updated. The total number of problems now exceeds 450. A solutions manual is available to professors using this book in a course. They can obtain a copy from their local Prentice Hall representative. In addition, over 250 new references to the current literature have been added to bring the book up to date.

Despite the removal of more than 400 pages of old material, the book has increased in size due to the large amount of new material added. While the book is still suitable for a one-semester or two-quarter course, it is probably too long for a one-quarter or one-trimester course at most universities. For this reason, the book has been designed in a modular way. Any course on operating systems should cover chapters 1 through 6. This is basic material that every student show know.

If additional time is available, additional chapters can be covered. Each of them assumes the reader has finished chapters 1 through 6, but Chaps. 7 through 12 are each self contained, so any desired subset can be used and in any order, depending on the interests of the instructor. In the author's opinion, Chaps. 7 through 12 are much more interesting than the earlier ones. Instructors should tell their students that they have to eat their broccoli before they can have the double chocolate fudge cake dessert.

I would like to thank the following people for their help in reviewing parts of the manuscript: Rida Bazzi, Riccardo Bettati, Felipe Cabrera, Richard Chapman, John Connely, John Dickinson, John Elliott, Deborah Frincke, Chandana Gamage, Robbert Geist, David Golds, Jim Griffioen, Gary Harkin, Frans Kaashoek, Mukkai Krishnamoorthy, Monica Lam, Jussi Leiwo, Herb Mayer, Kirk McKusick, Evi Nemeth, Bill Potvin, Prasant Shenoy, Thomas Skinner, Xian-He Sun, William Terry, Robbert Van Renesse, and Maarten van Steen. Jamie Hanrahan, Mark Russinovich, and Dave Solomon were enormously knowledgeable about Windows 2000 and very helpful. Special thanks go to A1 Woodhull for valuable reviews and thinking of many new end-of-chapter problems.

My students were also helpful with comments and feedback, especially Staas de Jong, Jan de Vos, Niels Drost, David Fokkema, Auke Folkerts, Peter Groenewegen, Wilco Ibes, Stefan Jansen, Jeroen Ketema, Joeri Minder, Irwin Oppenheim, Stef Post, Umar Rehman, Daniel Rijkhof, Maarten Sander, Maurits van der Schee, Rik van der Stoel, Mark van Drill, Dennis van Veen, and Thomas Zeeman.

Barbara and Marvin are still wonderful, as usual, each in a unique way. Finally, last but not least, I would like to thank Suzanne for her love and patience, not to mention all the druiven and kersen, which have replaced the sinasappelsap in recent times.

Andrew S. Tanenbaum

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. Introduction.
2. Processes and Threads.
3. Deadlocks.
4. Memory Management.
5. Input/Output.
6. File Systems.
7. Multimedia Operating Systems.
8. Multiple Processor Systems.
9. Security.
10. Case Study 1: UNIX and Linux.
11. Case Study 2: Windows 2000.
12. Operating System Design.
Read More Show Less

Preface

PREFACE:

PREFACE

The world has changed a great deal since the first edition of this book appeared in 1992. Computer networks and distributed systems of all kinds have become very common. Small children now roam the Internet, where previously only computer professionals went. As a consequence, this book has changed a great deal, too.

The most obvious change is that the first edition was about half on single-processor operating systems and half on distributed systems. I chose that format in 1991 because few universities then had courses on distributed systems and whatever students learned about distributed systems had to be put into the operating systems course, for which this book was intended. Now most universities have a separate course on distributed systems, so it is not necessary to try to combine the two subjects into one course and one book. This book is intended for a first course on operating systems, and as such focuses mostly on traditional single-processor systems.

I have coauthored two other books on operating systems. This leads to two possible course sequences.

Practically-oriented sequence:

  1. Operating Systems Design and Implementation by Tanenbaum and Woodhull
  2. Distributed Systems by Tanenbaum and Van Steen

Traditional sequence:

  1. Modern Operating Systems by Tanenbaum
  2. Distributed Systems by Tanenbaum and Van Steen

The former sequence uses MINIX and the students are expected to experiment with MINIX in an accompanying laboratory supplementing the first course. The latter sequence does not use MINIX. Instead, some small simulators areavailablethat can be used for student exercises during a first course using this book. These simulators can be found starting on the author's Web page: cs.vu.nl/~ast/ by clicking on Software and supplementary material for my books.

In addition to the major change of switching the emphasis to single-processor operating systems in this book, other major changes include the addition of entire chapters on computer security, multimedia operating systems, and Windows 2000, all important and timely topics. In addition, a new and unique chapter on operating system design has been added.

Another new feature is that many chapters now have a section on research about the topic of the chapter. This is intended to introduce the reader to modern work in processes, memory management, and so on. These sections have numerous references to the current research literature for the interested reader. In addition, Chapter 13 has many introductory and tutorial references.

Finally, numerous topics have been added to this book or heavily revised. These topics include: graphical user interfaces, multiprocessor operating systems, power management for laptops, trusted systems, viruses, network terminals, CDROM file systems, mutexes, RAID, soft timers, stable storage, fair-share scheduling, and new paging algorithms. Many new problems have been added and old ones updated. The total number of problems now exceeds 450. A solutions manual is available to professors using this book in a course. They can obtain a copy from their local Prentice Hall representative. In addition, over 250 new references to the current literature have been added to bring the book up to date.

Despite the removal of more than 400 pages of old material, the book has increased in size due to the large amount of new material added. While the book is still suitable for a one-semester or two-quarter course, it is probably too long for a one-quarter or one-trimester course at most universities. For this reason, the book has been designed in a modular way. Any course on operating systems should cover chapters 1 through 6. This is basic material that every student show know.

If additional time is available, additional chapters can be covered. Each of them assumes the reader has finished chapters 1 through 6, but Chaps. 7 through 12 are each self contained, so any desired subset can be used and in any order, depending on the interests of the instructor. In the author's opinion, Chaps. 7 through 12 are much more interesting than the earlier ones. Instructors should tell their students that they have to eat their broccoli before they can have the double chocolate fudge cake dessert.

I would like to thank the following people for their help in reviewing parts of the manuscript: Rida Bazzi, Riccardo Bettati, Felipe Cabrera, Richard Chapman, John Connely, John Dickinson, John Elliott, Deborah Frincke, Chandana Gamage, Robbert Geist, David Golds, Jim Griffioen, Gary Harkin, Frans Kaashoek, Mukkai Krishnamoorthy, Monica Lam, Jussi Leiwo, Herb Mayer, Kirk McKusick, Evi Nemeth, Bill Potvin, Prasant Shenoy, Thomas Skinner, Xian-He Sun, William Terry, Robbert Van Renesse, and Maarten van Steen. Jamie Hanrahan, Mark Russinovich, and Dave Solomon were enormously knowledgeable about Windows 2000 and very helpful. Special thanks go to A1 Woodhull for valuable reviews and thinking of many new end-of-chapter problems.

My students were also helpful with comments and feedback, especially Staas de Jong, Jan de Vos, Niels Drost, David Fokkema, Auke Folkerts, Peter Groenewegen, Wilco Ibes, Stefan Jansen, Jeroen Ketema, Joeri Minder, Irwin Oppenheim, Stef Post, Umar Rehman, Daniel Rijkhof, Maarten Sander, Maurits van der Schee, Rik van der Stoel, Mark van Drill, Dennis van Veen, and Thomas Zeeman.

Barbara and Marvin are still wonderful, as usual, each in a unique way. Finally, last but not least, I would like to thank Suzanne for her love and patience, not to mention all the druiven and kersen, which have replaced the sinasappelsap in recent times.

Andrew S. Tanenbaum

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 5, 2009

    A good and relevant book for the advanced computer student

    This book becomes very technical quickly. If you have never installed an operating systems or tinkered with your computer beyond the screen and keyboard you will get lost quickly. It is recommended for a well versed computer professional. There are a number of typos in the book but it does not detract from the meanings. At times the organization seems to jump around but it eventually comes together in the summaries of the chapters.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)