Modern Philosophy: An Introduction and Survey

Modern Philosophy: An Introduction and Survey

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by Roger Scruton
     
 

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Roger Scruton is one of the most widely respected philosophers of our time, whose often provocative views never fail to simulate debate. In Modern Philosophy he turns his attention to the whole of the field, from the philosophy of logic to aesthetics, and in so doing provides us with an essential and comprehensive guide to modern thinking.

Overview

Roger Scruton is one of the most widely respected philosophers of our time, whose often provocative views never fail to simulate debate. In Modern Philosophy he turns his attention to the whole of the field, from the philosophy of logic to aesthetics, and in so doing provides us with an essential and comprehensive guide to modern thinking.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This extensive survey of topics in modern philosophy as taught in English-speaking universities consists of two parts, about 500 and 100 pages, respectively. The former is the text that presents the ideas, theses, and arguments themselves; and the latter is a study guide that elucidates details, suggests topics for discussion, and names readings that expand the main text. The book is clearly written and well proportioned. By choosing sensibly which complexities to ignore, Scruton (The Classical Vernacular, St. Martin's, 1995) explains material no more technically and at no greater length than is necessary for nonprofessional readers to get the hang of it. Unfortunately, his penchant for making invidious remarks occasionally mars his exposition, but readers who inure themselves to this habit will cease to be distracted. Recommended for large public libraries and for academic philosophy collections.-Robert Hoffman, York Coll., CUNY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781448210510
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
11/26/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
650
Sales rank:
259,972
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

Roger Scruton was born in 1944. He is a conservative English philosopher and writer, and author of over 30 books, including several novels and two operas.

Scruton was a lecturer and professor of aesthetics at Birkbeck College, London, from 1971 to 1992. In 1982 he helped found The Salisbury Review, a conservative political journal, which he edited for 18 years. Since 1992 he has held part-time positions at Boston University, the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C., and the University of St Andrews. He also founded the Claridge Press in 1987, and sits on the editorial board of the British Journal of Aesthetics. He serves in addition as a member of the International Advisory Board of the Center for European Renewal.
Professor Roger Scruton is freelance writer, philosopher, author of more than 40 books, broadcaster and public commentator. He is a fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington.

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Modern Philosophy: An Introduction and Survey 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Chistopher More than 1 year ago
If you are a white, conservative man who believes in God and you want to turn back the clock on the world, you will probably enjoy this book. I say probably because I'm convinced that even some conservatives will feel manipulated by the book. My main complaint is with the title of the book. By reading the title, one might be tempted to draw the conclusion that the book would present an objective survey of modern philosophy. This is certainly not the case. In the introduction Mr. Scruton does inform you that he will express his opinions in the book and that the book will sometimes be controversial and he suggests that it will be clear to the reader when he is expressing his opinion. This last statement by the author is only half true. Sruton does indeed express his opinions throughout the book, however, he is much more sly in how he goes about manipulating the reader. He does this by his choice of philosophers to treat, by giving some philosophers much more ink than most modern philosphers think they deserve. His explantion and discussion of existentialism is facile, to put it mildly. Marxism comes in for particular scorn throughout the book. In his chapter on "The Devil" (of all things) I lost count of the number of times he mentions Marxism, but the word "Nazi" appears only once. Perhaps because Nazism was a far right fascist political movement and not a liberal movement, and after all, Mr. Scruton is out to attack the liberal position at every turn. On a positive note, Scruton is a gifted writer with an impressive style and this is the only reason I gave the book a rating of "2" instead of the lowest possible rating. If you have a degree in philosophy and you are interested in dipping your toes back into the subject then you might profit from reading the book because you would be able to put it in perspective. For a person new to the subject, I would suggest beginning with a more objective and less politically charged book or books on modern philosophy.