Mojo Box

Mojo Box

5.0 1
by Southern Culture on the Skids
     
 
This traveling medicine show has been running down the blue highways less traveled for well over a decade now, and it shows no sign of slowing down here. SCOTS hit on all cylinders, trailing grease and grit in their wake and promoting goofy grins with nifty riffs and winking double-entendres. The patented trailer-park update of Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood's

Overview

This traveling medicine show has been running down the blue highways less traveled for well over a decade now, and it shows no sign of slowing down here. SCOTS hit on all cylinders, trailing grease and grit in their wake and promoting goofy grins with nifty riffs and winking double-entendres. The patented trailer-park update of Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood's playful sexiness kicks in with maximum force on the frug-friendly "Doublewide," while the mad-scientist gene splicing rears up during a radically retooled country-blues take on the Creation's "Biff Bang Pow." What's still most impressive about SCOTS is the push-button fluidity with which they can shift gears between hipster styles as varied as surf-pop ("I Want a Love") and Orbison-styled croon ("Where Is the Moon?"). The same litheness runs through the band's instrumentals -- represented here by the bookend bump 'n' grinds "The Sweet Spot" and "The Wet Spot." All the advantages of a roadhouse jukebox, and none of the annoyance of looking for quarters -- who could ask for more?

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Mark Deming
Following the departure of keyboard player Chris Bess, Southern Culture on the Skids have pared themselves back down to a three-piece on their eighth full-length album, Mojo Box. While it's not quite a return to the gloriously greasy stomp of such early classics as For Lovers Only and Ditch Diggin', there is a significantly lower "novelty" factor here than they have displayed since their move up to the big leagues with Dirt Track Date, and the relatively leaner sound agrees with them. While SCOTS are a good-time band if there ever was one, a "funny for the sake of funny" vibe was starting to sink into the band's sound, but Mojo Box finds Rick Miller's songwriting displaying a keener focus than has been heard in years, and his bizarro-world redneck fantasias of luxury mobile homes, hot babes in halter tops, and classic muscle cars play more to his strengths than, say, "House of Bamboo" or "Make Mayan a Hawaiian." Miller's guitar work is in typically stellar form, too, while bassist Mary Huff holds down the bottom end with both efficiency and imagination (and sounds good on her vocal features) and drummer Dave Hartman is still making the clatter that matters. While Mojo Box has more than a few keyboard overdubs (including one guest spot from the departed Bess) and sounds pretty tidy by this band's standards, it still harks back to what made Southern Culture on the Skids more than just a batch of funny redneck jokes, and this is a welcome gesture back to classic form. Gotta love the twang-tastic cover of the Creation's "Biff Bang Pow" too!

Product Details

Release Date:
01/27/2004
Label:
Yep Roc Records
UPC:
0634457206328
catalogNumber:
2063

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Southern Culture on the Skids   Primary Artist
Rick Miller   Guitar,Vocals
Richard Putnam   Keyboards
Mary Huff   Bass,Keyboards,Vocals
Chris Bess   Keyboards
Dave Hartman   Drums,Background Vocals
James A. Lane   Trumpet

Technical Credits

Rick Miller   Composer,Producer
Eddie Phillips   Composer
Kenny Pickett   Composer
Jody Reynolds   Composer
Rob Walsh   Engineer
Mark Williams   Producer
David Yow   Cover Design
Mary Huff   Engineer
Mary Gunn   Graphic Design
Mark Anthony Williams   Producer

Customer Reviews

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5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Central North Carolina's SCOTS have done it again. Mojo Box is fresh, exciting and just down right good fun music. From Rick Miller's screaming guitar licks to Mary Huff's powerful bassline this album rocks. This should be an add to every music lovers collection. *****