Mojo Rock Steady

Mojo Rock Steady

     
 

Clement "Coxsone" Dodd ruled the ska age, but as tempos slowed and the style downshifted into rocksteady, Duke Reid's Treasure Isle label came to the fore, pushing Studio One aside. Revenge was delivered by virtually every other producer on the isle, beginning in the mid- to late '70s as Studio One'sSee more details below

Overview

Clement "Coxsone" Dodd ruled the ska age, but as tempos slowed and the style downshifted into rocksteady, Duke Reid's Treasure Isle label came to the fore, pushing Studio One aside. Revenge was delivered by virtually every other producer on the isle, beginning in the mid- to late '70s as Studio One's gorgeous rocksteady melodies were resurrected in the new rockers style. With the demise of the Skatalites, Roland Alphonso and Jackie Mittoo set up shop at Studio One with the rhythm team of Joe Isaacs and Brian Atkinson. Under the Soul Brothers moniker, this unit laid down myriad scintillating instrumentals and phenomenal backings as ska evolved into rocksteady. As the new style took hold, the band's lineup shifted and was renamed the Soul Vendors, who, with Mittoo's arrangements, created some of the label's most enduring instrumentals and backings. The Heptones' Leroy Sibbles eventually took up bass and joined the group, guitarist Eric Frater enlisted, and under the moniker the Sound Dimension, helped lead Studio One into the reggae age. Mojo Rock Steady gives us a taste of all three of these seminal aggregates, and with them a clutch of classic riddims. The Soul Vendors' "Psychedelic Rock," incorrectly attributed to Sound Dimension, is today better known as the much versioned "Rockfort Rock" riddim, the Vendors' equally crucial "Death in the Arena" appears in its DJ version as "Whipping the Prince," while we get the original instrumental version of the title track and its DJ version. The instrumentals are magnificent, but the likes of the Gaylads, the Bassies, the Clarendonians, and the sublime Hortense Ellis easily hold up the vocal end of the set, while some of the best cuts come from virtual unknowns, like Hugh Godfrey's exciting "They Got to Go" and Denise Darlington's "Feel so Good." Unbelievably, beyond the instrumentals, few of these numbers were actually hits, with the set aimed more at the collector than the "best-of" crowds. But so strong was Studio One during this era that even this compilation of lesser lights shines bright.

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Product Details

Release Date:
02/28/1994
Label:
Heartbeat Records
UPC:
0011661763425
catalogNumber:
134

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Mojo Rock Steady  - Prince Francis
  2. I Am Free  -  Gaylads
  3. Psychedelic Rock (Rockfort Rock)  -  Sound Dimension
  4. They Got to Go @@Hugh Godfrey
  5. Take Me  - Roland Alphonso
  6. Hot and Cold  -  Soul Brothers
  7. Rockers Corner  - King Stitt
  8. Feel So Good  - Denise Darlington
  9. Mojo Rock Steady  -  Sound Dimension
  10. River Jordan @@Bassies
  11. Whipping the Prince @@Ellis, Alton & The Soul Vendors
  12. Secretly  - Hortense Ellis
  13. People Get Ready  -  Minstrels
  14. Rock and Sock  - Roland Alphonso
  15. Tables Gonna Turn  -  Clarendonians
  16. Africa  -  Gaylads

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Alton Ellis   Track Performer
Soul Brothers   Track Performer
Roland Alphonso   Saxophone,Track Performer
Richard Ace   Keyboards
Bobby Ellis   Trumpet
Hortense Ellis   Track Performer
Gaylads   Track Performer
Jackie Mittoo   Organ
Sound Dimension   Track Performer
Clarendonians   Track Performer
Minstrels   Track Performer
King Stitt   Track Performer
Errol Walters   Guitar
Denise Darlington   Track Performer
Hector Williams   Drums
Joe Isaacs   Drums

Technical Credits

Alton Ellis   Composer
Clement "Coxsone" Dodd   Composer,Producer,Engineer
Hortense Ellis   Composer
Toby Mountain   Mastering
Jackson   Liner Notes

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