The Molecular and Cellular Biology of Wound Repair / Edition 1

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Overview

'Provides comprehensive detail on the various aspects of particular molecules involved in the phases of injury and repair and the cellular movements and processes....This is an excellent reference book for libraries serving biology and health science clientele and for workers in this field of research.' -American Scientist, from a review of the First Edition All chapters of this second edition have been completely revised and expanded-especially the chapters on growth factors and extracellular matrix molecules. New chapters discuss provisional matrix proteins, extracellular matrix receptors, and scarring versus nonscarring wound healing.

The book contains predominantly black-and-white illustrations, with some color illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
Reviewer: Alvin Telser, PhD (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine)
Description: This book covers the basic and molecular mechanisms of wound healing.
Purpose: This volume is edited by R.A.F. Clark, who states that the book should serve as a bridge between the basic scientist and the clinician who are interested in the basic mechanisms of wound repair. This is a worthy goal and meets the author's objectives to a fair degree.
Audience: The intended audience is basic research scientists and clinicians (who may be caring for patients or doing research). It may also be used as a textbook by students taking a course in wound healing and repair, although the author does not state this explicitly.
Features: Although illustrations are not a major feature of this text, there is an adequate number of tables and diagrams in each chapter. The light and electron micrographs that are included are not of very high quality, owing much more to the print quality and paper used in producing this book than to the original science depicted. Matrix materials, microvasculature, and connective tissue cells are difficult to appreciate and interpret in any micrograph, so a poor quality of reproduction diminishes their value to the reader. The table of contents and index are fine. Each of the 18 chapters is well referenced.
Assessment: This book has some of the qualities of a textbook and some of the qualities of a review. One gets the feeling that the authors of the various chapters weren't quite sure for whom they were writing. Consequently, the book, albeit somewhat useful, may be less useful for beginners in this field than for more experienced scholars. Nonetheless, it should be on the shelves of biomedical libraries, and some medical school bookstores may also find it worth stocking.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Alvin Telser, PhD(Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine)
Description: This book covers the basic and molecular mechanisms of wound healing.
Purpose: This volume is edited by R.A.F. Clark, who states that the book should serve as a bridge between the basic scientist and the clinician who are interested in the basic mechanisms of wound repair. This is a worthy goal and meets the author's objectives to a fair degree.
Audience: The intended audience is basic research scientists and clinicians (who may be caring for patients or doing research). It may also be used as a textbook by students taking a course in wound healing and repair, although the author does not state this explicitly.
Features: Although illustrations are not a major feature of this text, there is an adequate number of tables and diagrams in each chapter. The light and electron micrographs that are included are not of very high quality, owing much more to the print quality and paper used in producing this book than to the original science depicted. Matrix materials, microvasculature, and connective tissue cells are difficult to appreciate and interpret in any micrograph, so a poor quality of reproduction diminishes their value to the reader. The table of contents and index are fine. Each of the 18 chapters is well referenced.
Assessment: This book has some of the qualities of a textbook and some of the qualities of a review. One gets the feeling that the authors of the various chapters weren't quite sure for whom they were writing. Consequently, the book, albeit somewhat useful, may be less useful for beginners in this field than for more experienced scholars. Nonetheless, it should be on the shelves of biomedical libraries, and some medical school bookstores may also find it worth stocking.
Alvin Telser
This book covers the basic and molecular mechanisms of wound healing. This volume is edited by R.A.F. Clark, who states that the book should serve as a bridge between the basic scientist and the clinician who are interested in the basic mechanisms of wound repair. This is a worthy goal and meets the author's objectives to a fair degree. The intended audience is basic research scientists and clinicians (who may be caring for patients or doing research). It may also be used as a textbook by students taking a course in wound healing and repair, although the author does not state this explicitly. Although illustrations are not a major feature of this text, there is an adequate number of tables and diagrams in each chapter. The light and electron micrographs that are included are not of very high quality, owing much more to the print quality and paper used in producing this book than to the original science depicted. Matrix materials, microvasculature, and connective tissue cells are difficult to appreciate and interpret in any micrograph, so a poor quality of reproduction diminishes their value to the reader. The table of contents and index are fine. Each of the 18 chapters is well referenced. This book has some of the qualities of a textbook and some of the qualities of a review. One gets the feeling that the authors of the various chapters weren't quite sure for whom they were writing. Consequently, the book, albeit somewhat useful, may be less useful for beginners in this field than for more experienced scholars. Nonetheless, it should be on the shelves of biomedical libraries, and some medical school bookstores may also find it worth stocking.
Booknews
Combines clinical and scientific approaches to wound healing. Section I overviews processes in wound repair, the macrophage, and inflammation. Section II provides a comprehensive survey of the epidermal, fibroblast, growth, platelet-derived, and transforming growth factors. Section III looks at the cutaneous paradigm of new tissue formation. Section IV focuses on tissue remodeling, with chapters on proteases, extracellular matrix molecules, and scar formation. Includes b&w illustrations. This second edition is extensively revised. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780306451591
  • Publisher: Springer US
  • Publication date: 4/1/2002
  • Series: The Language of Science Series
  • Edition description: 2nd ed. 1996
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 611
  • Product dimensions: 9.21 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Table of Contents

Wound Repair: Overview and General Considerations (R.A.F. Clark). Provisional Matrix (K.M. Yamada, R.A.F. Clark). Macrophage Involvement in Wound Repair, Remodeling and Fibrosis (D.W.H. Riches). Resolution of Inflammation: Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Implications (C. Haslett, P. Henson). Epidermal Growth Factor and Transforming Growth Factor (L.B. Nanney, L.E. King, Jr.). Modulation of Wound Repair by Members of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Family (J.A. Abraham, M. Klagsbrun). Role of Plateletderived Growth Factor in vivo (C.H. Heldin, B. Westermark). Transforming Growth Factor£Ii£ (TGF£Ii£) (A.B. Roberts, M.B. Sporn). Integrins in Wound Repair (K.M. Yamada et al.). Reepithelialization (D.T. Woodley). Angiogenesis (J.A. Madri et al.). Mechanisms of Parenchymal Cell Migration into Wounds (J.B. McCarthy et al.). The Role of the Myofibroblast in Wound Healing and Fibrocontractive Diseases (A. Desmouliere, G. Gabbiani). Proteinases and Tissue Remodeling (P. Mignatti et al.). Proteoglycans and Their Role in Wound Repair (R.L. Gallo, M. Bernfield). Collagens and the Reestablishment of Dermal Integrity (B. Eckes et al.). The DermalEpidermal Basement Membrane Zone in Cutaneous Wound Healing (J. Uitto et al.). Fetal Wound Healing and the Development of Antiscarring Therapies for Adult Wound Healing (R.L. McCallion, M.W.J. Ferguson). Index.
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