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Molecular Biology of Diabetes, Part II: Insulin Action, Effects on Gene Expression and Regulation, and Glucose Transport / Edition 1

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Overview

These comprehensive yet concise collections of articles by world experts survey the latest findings on the molecular biology of diabetes and insulin action and synthesize a coherent understanding of the subject. Topics include the etiology of type I and type II diabetes, molecular and cellular aspects of insulin action, and the mechanism of the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Louis H. Philipson, MD, PhD (University of Chicago Medical Center)
Description: This book is the second of a new two-part series designed to address current topics in the molecular biology of insulin secretion and etiology of diabetes mellitus (Part I) and insulin action (Part II).
Purpose: The distinguished editors have chosen twenty-six principal scientists and seventy total contributors to review what insulin does and how it does it. Topics include structure-function aspects of the insulin receptor, pathways of insulin signaling, and insulin-regulated glucose transport. The chapters reflect the great recent progress in these areas, but inevitably some chapters are already out of date. For example, several essays concern the IRS-1 insulin receptor substrate, but more recent gene knockout studies have shown it to be only part of a redundant system.
Audience: Chapters vary widely in their scope and comprehensiveness. Several are excellent reviews or highly methods-oriented, and clearly targeted for the student or postdoctoral student. Other chapters address a single controversy from a personal point of view.
Features: A few chapters are underillustrated with line drawings or autoradiograms, some poorly reproduced, that are difficult to interpret. Some chapters seem out of sequence. For example, the book opens with a comprehensive review of insulin-receptor mutations and then proceeds to a review of structure-function relationships, rather than the other way around, requiring redundancy. Several chapters on other receptors related to the insulin receptor appear misplaced in a book focused on diabetes, as does a chapter on chiroinositol that contains nothing related to molecular biology in the conventional sense. The book ends with five authoritative reviews of insulin-sensitive glucose transporters, presenting a great deal of overlapping material.
Assessment: This volume contains several excellent chapters, providing a comprehensive overview for the postdoctoral student or colleague in a related field needing a thorough update on insulin action.
Louis H. Philipson
This book is the second of a new two-part series designed to address current topics in the molecular biology of insulin secretion and etiology of diabetes mellitus (Part I) and insulin action (Part II). The distinguished editors have chosen twenty-six principal scientists and seventy total contributors to review what insulin does and how it does it. Topics include structure-function aspects of the insulin receptor, pathways of insulin signaling, and insulin-regulated glucose transport. The chapters reflect the great recent progress in these areas, but inevitably some chapters are already out of date. For example, several essays concern the IRS-1 insulin receptor substrate, but more recent gene knockout studies have shown it to be only part of a redundant system. Chapters vary widely in their scope and comprehensiveness. Several are excellent reviews or highly methods-oriented, and clearly targeted for the student or postdoctoral student. Other chapters address a single controversy from a personal point of view. A few chapters are underillustrated with line drawings or autoradiograms, some poorly reproduced, that are difficult to interpret. Some chapters seem out of sequence. For example, the book opens with a comprehensive review of insulin-receptor mutations and then proceeds to a review of structure-function relationships, rather than the other way around, requiring redundancy. Several chapters on other receptors related to the insulin receptor appear misplaced in a book focused on diabetes, as does a chapter on chiroinositol that contains nothing related to molecular biology in the conventional sense. The book ends with five authoritative reviews of insulin-sensitive glucosetransporters, presenting a great deal of overlapping material. This volume contains several excellent chapters, providing a comprehensive overview for the postdoctoral student or colleague in a related field needing a thorough update on insulin action.
Booknews
The second of two volumes comprising comprehensive but concise collections of articles that survey the latest knowledge on the molecular biology of diabetes and insulin action and synthesize a coherent understanding of the subject. They cover the widest variety of topics including the etiology of type I and type II diabetes, the genetics of diabetes, the molecular and cellular aspects of insulin action, and the insulin-stimulated glucose intake. Part 1 focused exclusively on the genetic basis of diabetes and the molecular biology of insulin synthesis, secretion, and regulation. Part II more specifically treats insulin action and the molecular mechanisms of insulin-regulatable glucose transport. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

2 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780896032873
  • Publisher: Springer-Verlag New York, LLC
  • Publication date: 11/16/1994
  • Edition description: 1995
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 574
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 1.44 (d)

Table of Contents

Section I: Molecular and Cellular Aspects of Insulin Action. Mutations in the Insulin Receptor Gene in Patients with Genetic Syndromes of Extreme Insulin Resistance. The Insulin Receptor: Structure/Function Relationship. Identification of Diabetes-Related Genes by Subtraction Cloning. The Insulin Receptor-Related. Structure of Insulin Receptor Substrate 1 and Role in Insulin Signaling as a Docking Protein for SH2 Domain-Containing Proteins. Phosphatidylinositol 3'-Kinase and Insulin Action. The Role of p21ras in Insulin Signaling. MAP Kinase Pathways and Insulin Action. Raf-1 Kinase. Role of Phosphoprotein Phosphatase 1 (PP-1) in the Mechanism of Insulin Action. The Role (or Lack Thereof) of Protein Kinase C in Insulin Action. Regulation of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Gene by Insulin. Regulation of Gene 33 Expression by Insulin. Distinct Elements in the PEPCK and Amylase Genes Mediate the Diabetes and Carbohydrate Response: Potential Role of IRE-ABP in Mediating the Dietary Response. Molecular Aspects of Insulin-Regulated Hepatic Growth. Endocytosis and Cellular Processing of Insulin-Receptor Complexes: Mechanisms and Biological Functions. Chiroinositol Deficiency and Insulin Resistance: A Clinical Perspective. Regulation of c-fos Gene Expression by Insulin in Neurons. Molecular Comparison of the Insulin and IGF-I Receptors. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I and Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins in Diabetes. Structure-Function Properties of Insulin/IGF-I Hybrid Receptors. Section II: Molecular Mechanisms of the Insulin-Regulatable Glucose Transport. GLUT-4 Glucose Transporters and Insulin Action in Humans: Regulation at the Level of Gene Expression and Cellular Trafficking. Mutant GLUT-4 and the Role of GLUT-4 Phosphorylation in Controlling Glucose Transport. GLUT-4 Phosphorylation: Effects of Phosphorylation on Glucose Transport and Intrinsic Activity. Glucose Transporters of Muscle Cells in Culture: Developmental Regulation and Modulation by Lipoic Acid, an Anti-Hyperglycemic Agent. Expression of the GLUT-4 Glucose Transporter in Diabetes. Index.
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