Molecular Pharmacology: From DNA to Drug Design

Molecular Pharmacology: From DNA to Drug Design

by John Dickenson, Fiona Freeman, Chris Lloyd Mills, Christian Thode
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

This textbook provides a fresh, comprehensive and accessible introduction to the rapidly expanding field of molecular pharmacology. Adopting a drug target-based, rather than the traditional organ/system based, approach this innovative guide reflects the current advances and research trend towards molecular based drug design, derived from a detailed understanding of

Overview

This textbook provides a fresh, comprehensive and accessible introduction to the rapidly expanding field of molecular pharmacology. Adopting a drug target-based, rather than the traditional organ/system based, approach this innovative guide reflects the current advances and research trend towards molecular based drug design, derived from a detailed understanding of chemical responses in the body. Drugs are then tailored to fit a treatment profile, rather than the traditional method of ‘trial and error’ drug discovery which focuses on testing chemicals on animals or cell cultures and matching their effects to treatments.

Providing an invaluable resource for advanced under-graduate and MSc/PhD students, new researchers to the field and practitioners for continuing professional development, Molecular Pharmacology explores; recent advances and developments in the four major human drug target families (G-protein coupled receptors, ion channels, nuclear receptors and transporters), cloning of drug targets, transgenic animal technology, gene therapy, pharmacogenomics and looks at the role of calcium in the cell.

  • Current - focuses on cutting edge techniques and approaches, including new methods to quantify biological activities in different systems and ways to interpret and understand pharmacological data.
  • Cutting Edge - highlights advances in pharmacogenomics and explores how an individual’s genetic makeup influences their response to therapeutic drugs and the potential for harmful side effects.
  • Applied - includes numerous, real-world examples and a detailed case-study based chapter which looks at current and possible future treatment strategies for cystic fibrosis. This case study considers the relative merits of both drug therapy for specific classes of mutation and gene therapy to correct the underlying defect.
  • Accessible - contains a comprehensive glossary, suggestions for further reading at the end of each chapter and an associated website that provides a complete set of figures from within the book.

A companion website with additional resources is available at www.wiley.com/go/dickenson/dnamolecular

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Kenneth E. McCarson, BChE, PhD (University of Kansas Medical Center)
Description: This book provides a platform for teaching the fundamental aspects of molecular pharmacology from a fresh perspective that emphasizes genes, targets, and drug-design approaches that drive modern pharmacology research rather than the typical organ- or disease-based survey strategy employed by most basic graduate pharmacology books. An introductory chapter clearly plots the intent of the text, and the 11 remaining chapters describe the major target classes and mediators important in pharmacological responses. Chapters on pharmacogenomics, genetic model engineering, and a genetic disease example strengthen the impact of the book considerably.
Purpose: The editors and authors, a team from Nottingham Trent University in the U.K., unfortunately state their primary goal is to complement their students' course experiences, outcomes of which are difficult to infer. However, the authors have devised a clearly organized source for postgraduate pharmacology students to find detailed information on a broad set of highly relevant gene products and the currently favored approaches for researching their function and targeting them with new drugs. This approach provides welcome relief from the typical systems-based survey of pharmacology that better suits students headed toward clinical careers. In this regard, the book provides a very strong bridge between basic physiology and biochemistry or introductory general pharmacological principles and general broad pharmacology and therapeutics courses.
Audience: As is the intent of the editors, this book is appropriate for postgraduate pharmacology or neuropharmacology trainees. Readers certainly need a relatively high undergraduate level understanding of physiology and biochemistry to benefit from this book. The breadth of topics and targets addressed, combined with the depth of detail in each chapter would also, as the editors suggest, make the book useful to postgraduate researchers as a reference source. The editors and authors are established researchers in the bioscience department at Nottingham Trent and bring considerable expertise to the task.
Features: This book provides a solid body of detailed information about the molecular targets and mechanisms that underlie most of the relevant targets for drug development in modern pharmacology research. An introductory chapter sets the stage by defining a perspective that emphasizes the importance of the targets and approaches described in the chapters on current drug development strategies. Chapters then provide in-depth discussions of the major classes of drug targets, including GPCRs, ion channels, transporters, and nuclear receptors. Others address major mechanisms that regulate intracellular signaling, such as calcium and protein interactions. The book is especially good at incorporating issues related to genetics, such as pharmacogenomics and engineering of mutant models of disease. One chapter provides an example of how each of these approaches and several targets are involved in a specific disease (cystic fibrosis). The level of the material is very even across all chapters, and there is little or no redundancy or overlap between them. The supporting graphics are outstanding in both content and visual quality. A useful glossary is included, as is an index.
Assessment: This is successful as a complete, well-integrated overview of the major current topics in molecular pharmacology. The breadth of subjects addressed is wide and comprehensive enough to support a complete introductory course on this material, but also provides excellent depth and detail in each chapter. This book has more even coverage of this large field without the gaps in topics evident in other mechanism-based molecular pharmacology books. Overall, it could be the basis of an excellent course for junior pharmacologists in basic science research who need a greater focus on the mechanisms of drug action rather than an encyclopedic survey of clinical drug use.
From the Publisher
“An informative, comprehensive text, it is highly recommended to postgraduates and researchers in both pharmacology and molecular biology.”  (Science Progress, 1 March 2014)

“Overall, it could be the basis of an excellent course for junior pharmacologists in basic science research who need a greater focus on the mechanisms of drug action rather than an encyclopedic survey of clinical drug use.”  (Doody’s, 26 July 2013)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470684436
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
01/22/2013
Pages:
424
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.80(d)

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >