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Molecules and Medicine
     

Molecules and Medicine

4.3 4
by E. J. Corey, Barbara Czakó, László Kürti
 

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Molecules and Medicine provides, for the first time ever, a completely integrated look at chemistry, biology, drug discovery, and medicine. It delves into the discovery, application, and mode of action of more than one hundred of the most significant molecules in use in modern medicine. Opening sections of the book provide a unique, clear, and concise

Overview

Molecules and Medicine provides, for the first time ever, a completely integrated look at chemistry, biology, drug discovery, and medicine. It delves into the discovery, application, and mode of action of more than one hundred of the most significant molecules in use in modern medicine. Opening sections of the book provide a unique, clear, and concise introduction, which enables readers to understand chemical formulas.

Editorial Reviews

Reviewer: Eugene A Davidson, PhD(Georgetown University School of Medicine)
Description: This is a picture book with explanations — various drugs are shown together with a superficial discussion of their application.
Purpose: The goal is to introduce molecules to the interested student. The hook is the medical utility of the representatives chosen, but the value of this is questionable and it is not clear that the goal is achieved.
Audience: The intended audience is undergraduate students with some passing interest in how drugs might work. Most lay readers could follow the text as well. One of the authors is a world class authority.
Features: This is basically a picture book of commonly used drugs, presenting structural and computer-derived space-filling formulas, divided into classes by their medical applications. In each target, some brief description of possible mode of action is provided. Some of the material is out of date and the choice of drugs seems entirely arbitrary (why lipitor, for example, as the only statin drug?). Statements like "Chemistry can cure disease," while true in some circumstances, are clearly hyperbole. References are provided for each of the compounds. A serious concern is that uninitiated readers (the target audience) will acquire a very superficial and possibly misleading set of facts about one or another commercial product. "A little learning is a dangerous thing," as Alexander Pope notably stated. Physics for poets may have its place, but science deserves better.
Assessment: This effort cannot be recommended since it is overly superficial.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781118361733
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
02/28/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
272
File size:
26 MB
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Meet the Author

E. J. Corey has been a Professor at Harvard University since 1959. He was educated at The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1945-1950) and served as a faculty member at the University of Illinois from1951 to 1959. He is the 1990 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, and the recipient of over seventy international awards and honorary degrees, including the U.S. National Medal of Science, the Japan Prize in Science, and the Priestley Medal of the American Chemical Society. He is amember of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. National Institute of Medicine. Professor Corey is the author of more than 1,000 publications and is one of the most cited authors in science.

Barbara Czakó completed undergraduate studies at the University of Debrecen, Hungary, where she worked with Dr. Sándor Berényi. She obtained a Master of Science degree at the University of Missouri-Columbia with Professor Shon R. Pulley. Dr. Czakó received her Ph.D. degree (2006) in synthetic organic chemistry under the guidance of Professor Gary A. Molander at the University of Pennsylvania. Currently she is a postdoctoral fellow with Professor E.J. Corey at Harvard University. In 2005 she published with László Kürti the textbook Strategic Applications of Named Reactions in Organic Synthesis.

László Kürti was born and raised in Hungary. He received his diploma from the University of Debrecen, Hungary, where he conducted research in the laboratory of Professor Sándor Antus. Subsequently he received his Master of Science degree at the University of Missouri-Columbia working with Professor Michael Harmata, and his Ph.D. degree (2006) in synthetic organic chemistry under the supervision of Professor Amos B. Smith III (the University of Pennsylvania). Currently he is a Damon Runyon Cancer Fellow in the group of Professor E.J. Corey at Harvard University. In 2005 he published with Barbara Czakó the textbook Strategic Applications of Named Reactions in Organic Synthesis.

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Molecules and Medicine 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very good explanation clear and even though its a bit technacal at times otherwise its perfect!!! 500 stars!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The thoughtful presentation of what drugs can and can not do in medicine. This analysis is based om the chemical structure of the drug and the known mechanisms of the drug's action. It is a text not unlike Richard Courant's What is Mathematics useful to the beginning student as well as a professor of science and medicine. It may serve well an enlightened layman and a physician in practise.