Molly Ivins: Letters to The Nation

Molly Ivins: Letters to The Nation

4.5 2
by Molly Ivins
     
 

Writing in her native “Texlish,” Molly Ivins planted herself squarely in the tradition of plain-spoken and earthy American humor, the big river that runs from Mark Twain straight through to Will Rogers, Ring Lardner and George Carlin.

Between 1982 and 2007, Ivins contributed seventeen consistently sharp and funny articles to The Nation, starting…  See more details below

Overview

Writing in her native “Texlish,” Molly Ivins planted herself squarely in the tradition of plain-spoken and earthy American humor, the big river that runs from Mark Twain straight through to Will Rogers, Ring Lardner and George Carlin.

Between 1982 and 2007, Ivins contributed seventeen consistently sharp and funny articles to The Nation, starting with what might be described as her “Letters From Texas,” in which she discussed political developments in the Lone Star State, whose zany politics were full of exotic people dubbed “The Gibber,” “The Breck Girl” and “Governor Goodhair.”

Despite their humor, however, Ivins’s pieces always delivered trenchant political commentary. And she could also write highly accomplished and fascinating cultural essays and book reviews (such as “Ezra Pound in East Texas,” included in this eBook).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940016448169
Publisher:
The Nation Magazine
Publication date:
06/14/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
282,993
File size:
4 MB

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Molly Ivins: Letters to The Nation 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
LOVE2READ-ECLECTIC More than 1 year ago
Even now from her observation post in the big sky over Texas, Molly's irreverent insights, intellect and wit delighted me. A welcome addition to my e-book library. Having been a 'transient Texan'--1968-74 (Dallas) and 1981 (Beaumont). I fondly relate to her observations. Especially her views on the 'Golden Triangle'/Beaumont. A corner of the world which I've often described to friends as a place where when you discovered someone in the midst of a 'bald-faced lie', they wanted to 'knife-fight' you for their honor. You'll delight at her images and characterizations. The reprinting of a 25 year collection of correspondence with readers of The Nation, does suffer from some repetition of description of her 'Texican' politicians, the essays hold up as humorous pleasure. A quick, fun, and insightful read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago