×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Molly McGinty Has a Really Good Day
     

Molly McGinty Has a Really Good Day

3.8 11
by Gary Paulsen
 

See All Formats & Editions

TODAY MOLLY

Learned her wacky grandma was coming to spend the day at school with her;

Lost her Notebook with Everything that Matters in it, including her homework;

Got a black eye.

Tore her skirt.

And it’s only 9 a.m.

Could things get any worse?

You bet!


From the Hardcover edition.

Overview

TODAY MOLLY

Learned her wacky grandma was coming to spend the day at school with her;

Lost her Notebook with Everything that Matters in it, including her homework;

Got a black eye.

Tore her skirt.

And it’s only 9 a.m.

Could things get any worse?

You bet!


From the Hardcover edition.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Prolific author Paulsen (Hatchet; Nightjohn) aims for laughs but misses in this slight story about an anal-retentive girl forced to work without her net. The "exceedingly organized" Molly keeps life tidy in a three-ring binder with sections for school, social life and family life, in order to manage the home she shares with her grandmother, Irene, since her parents' death in a car accident (a loss treated matter-of-factly). Irene and Molly are not ideally suited as roommates: for each of Molly's strictures, her grandmother has a corresponding wild hair. The morning that the binder disappears, Molly must prepare for a test without notes. It's also Senior Citizen Day, an event Irene hasn't missed-to Molly's horror-since kindergarten. The broadly farcical plot careens from one implausible event to the next. In Molly's mind, the loss of the notebook sets off the chain of mishaps. She gets a black eye before leaving the house ("Come on, princess, we'll grab an ice pack for that eye on the way to the bus stop," Irene says). She also tears her skirt, finds herself lugging around both Irene's huge handbag and a friend's cello, and delinquents who are lighting matches singe her hair. Unfortunately, Paulsen never explores the real motivation behind orphaned Molly's need for structure, and the revelation that Irene deliberately swiped the binder seems cruel, not funny. Ages 8-12. (Sept.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Gary Paulsen admits in his foreword that most of his books are about boys, "because I was a boy and I did boy things." His superb storytelling capabilities definitely shine more brilliantly in stories about boys and dogs and survival. Although Paulsen says Molly McGinty is based on the organizational capabilities of an actual girl, her voice in this story does not sound real. Even well-organized middle schoolers don't keep copies of insurance riders and their grandmother's schedules in their binders. The humor of the story centers around Molly's grandmother, who is her guardian and who has also chosen to spend the day going to class with Molly. Grandma Irene sports purple suede pants and defends the civil rights of students on more than one occasion, to the eternal embarrassment of Molly. There are some humorous moments, but most of the dialogue seems artificial and the ending is simply a lesson on the importance of being more spontaneous and less dependent on a lost binder. 2004, Wendy Lamb Books, Ages 7 to 10.
—Karen Leggett
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-Molly McGinty, a sixth-grader at Our Lady of Mercy Middle School, is panicked over the loss of her three-ring binder. In it she keeps everything she needs to be organized, such as homework assignments, addresses, and due dates of library books and her grandmother's bills. To make things worse, her extraverted and unconventional grandmother and guardian, Irene, comes to school on Senior Citizens' Day. The woman introduces the French class to vocabulary that sound like swear words, gets busted for smoking in the girls' room, initiates a poetry slam, and talks Father Connery into letting the social studies class listen to a baseball game as an example of democracy in action. Despite her embarrassment, Molly comes to appreciate the school's social misfits and also snags a boyfriend. And by the time she recovers her notebook, she's learned, thanks to Irene, "to go with the flow." Although the overexuberant woman is a little hard to believe, the character still works. This light, breezy romp is humorous and as unpredictable as Grandma Irene.-Jean Gaffney, Dayton and Montgomery County Public Library, Miamisburg, OH Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
There's only one problem with organizing one's entire life in a multi-pocketed three-ring binder: it might get lost. Alas, this is the fate of sixth-grader Molly McGinty, black belt in the art of maximum productivity. Molly has to be organized, because her grandmother/guardian, a talent agent for animals, lives life as if her creativity would be threatened by "paying bills on time, dressing sedately, and dusting." In fact, the eccentric bon vivant wears purple suede jeans to Senior Citizens' Day at Molly's Our Lady of Mercy Middle School, marking the beginning of Molly's "really good day," whose highlights include a black eye (dashing to the bus), getting set on fire, and having her hair braided against her will. Molly's perpetual battle against "widespread fundamental uncertainty" (and everything her grandmother stands for) is hilarious, and children with embarrassing relatives and those with obsessive-compulsive tendencies will understand completely. Early readers will no doubt devour this somewhat slapstick, atypically girl-centric Paulsen offering. (Fiction. 8-11)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307538499
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
01/21/2009
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
112
Sales rank:
1,181,349
File size:
2 MB
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Gary Paulsen is the distinguished author of many critically acclaimed books for young people, His most recent books are The Glass Café and Brian’s Hunt. The author lives in New Mexico and on the Pacific Ocean.


From the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Molly McGinty Has a Really Good Day 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Crystal Menser More than 1 year ago
best book you will ever encounter
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
i love gary paulsen and this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
????
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The name's Dasha. Or Dashavere Myllainir for my full name. Everyone hates my guts. Just because I tried to save the world. I saved them, but Farrinue Ji'amuger convinved them that she did and I caused the destruction. Grand mage Yizalaoare Thoraleini awarded Farri a memoris and me a seventy thousand year stay in jail. Farri the hero, Dasha the criminal. Every so often I stare at the Televidi shop across from my room There 's always a Televidi on for THE AMAZING FARRINUE! Show. The episodes are about Farri killing me after she saves the day. It makes me sick. I fume in my cell day after day. Month after month. Year after year. Century after century. Millenium after millenium. Until I am finally released. I ask for a remembrilum check. Grand mage Thoraleini herself checks my remembrilum as I am such a dangerous criminal. Hah. Farri is the one they should watch out for. This amuses me as well as sickens me. Thoraleini whisks through all my remembrila. Scenes of my life. She sees the scene where I save the world of Gaiaterre and Farrinue takes the credit. Then Farri storms in. But the damage has been done. Justice dealt. I am the hero now. I hate the attention. I hide. I explore the vast reaches of the uninhabited Ahelare plains. The Tavril mountains. The Zezamor valley. The Sea dal Blani. The Castle in the Sky. I and my Sliteye Longtail, Felini, are alone. And that is the way I want it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So far i only got teh sample and its really good and i want to no how old mollys grandmother is she sounds like she is 20!