BN.com Gift Guide

Molly's Pilgrim

( 5 )

Overview

Sparkling new illustrations refresh this Thanksgiving classic based on the true experience of a member of Barbara Cohen's family. The touching story tells how recent immigrant Molly leads her third-grade class to discover that it takes all kinds of pilgrims to make a Thanksgiving. Originally published in 1983, Molly's Pilgrim inspired the 1986 Academy Award winning live-action short film.

Told to make a Pilgrim doll for the Thanksgiving display at school, Molly is ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (64) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $1.99   
  • Used (54) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Sparkling new illustrations refresh this Thanksgiving classic based on the true experience of a member of Barbara Cohen's family. The touching story tells how recent immigrant Molly leads her third-grade class to discover that it takes all kinds of pilgrims to make a Thanksgiving. Originally published in 1983, Molly's Pilgrim inspired the 1986 Academy Award winning live-action short film.

Told to make a Pilgrim doll for the Thanksgiving display at school, Molly is embarassed when her mother tries to help her out by creating a doll dressed as she herself was dressed before leaving Russia to seek religious freedom.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Sun Chronicle
“This strong and important story easily ranks as one of the best choices for this and every Thanksgiving.”
ALA Booklist
“A thought-provoking Thanksgiving read-aloud.”
ALA Booklist
“A thought-provoking Thanksgiving read-aloud.”
Sun Chronicle
“This strong and important story easily ranks as one of the best choices for this and every Thanksgiving.”
Sun Chronicle
Molly wants to go back to Russia. The girls in her third-grade class make fun of Molly's imperfect english and her peasant-looking clothes. Her mother reminds her they can't go back to Russia; the reason they came to America was to escape religious persecution, and it would be very dangerous to return. To make matters worse, Molly's teacher gives the class a project for Thanksgiving. Not only has Molly never heard of Thanksgiving, but she is supposed to make a Pilgrim doll out of a clothespin for the class display. That evening, her mother offers to help, and when Molly takes her doll to school the next day, the children tease her, saying her doll doesn't look like a Pilgrim. But Molly defends her position, explaining why the doll her mother made is a pilgrim. With the help of the teacher, the entire class soon realizes that not only is Molly right, but it really does take "all kinds of Pilgrims to make a Thanksgiving." First published in 1983 and in its second printing, this strong and important story easily ranks as one of the best choices for this and every Thanksgiving.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A Russian immigrant girl adjusts to the American celebrations of Thanksgiving and birthdays, respectively. Ages 5-8; 6-10. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Beverly Kobrin
This is the story of a Jewish girl's struggle to assimilate when she immigrates to America. Teachers and students can compare and contrast bias issues by discussing variables like historic periods, ethnicity, race, gender, and responses of the characters. Once students understand prejudice throughout history, you may challenge them to apply their perspectives through reading newspaper coverage of events in Bosnia.
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
This is the story of a Jewish girl's struggle to assimilate when she immigrates to America. Teachers and students can compare and contrast bias issues by discussing variables like historic periods, ethnicity, race, gender, and responses of the characters. Once students understand prejudice throughout history, you may challenge them to apply their perspectives through reading newspaper coverage of events in Bosnia.
Children's Literature - Jeanne K. Pettenati
Molly and her family have recently emigrated from Russia. Children in her class make fun of the way she talks and dresses. Because Molly has a hard time fitting in, she is unhappy and wishes her family could move back to Russia or New York, where there are other Jewish families. Molly's participation in a school assignment about Thanksgiving pilgrims shows her and her classmates just how much she does belong in America. 1998 (orig.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780688162801
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/28/1998
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 97
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 48,135
  • Age range: 6 - 10 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 7.10 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Barbara Cohen (1932-1992) was the author of several acclaimed picture books and novels for young readers, including The Carp in the Bathtub, Yussel's Prayer: A Yom Kippur Story, Thank You, Jackie Robinson, and King of the Seventh Grade.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

I didn't like the school in Winter Hill. In Winter Hill, they laughed at me. Elizabeth laughed most of all. I never raised my hand to answer a question, but when Miss Stickley called on me, I had to say something. My English wasn't perfect yet, so Elizabeth always giggled at whatever I said. Miss Stickley would stare at her, and then she'd shut up. But later, in the schoolyard, she'd say, "You talk funny, Molly." And then she'd sing a song:
"Jolly Molly,
Your eyes are awf'ly small.
Jolly Molly,
Your nose is awf'ly tall."
Hilda and Kitty would sing the song too, and sometimes even Fay and Emma. They all admired Elizabeth. She brought peppermint sticks to school and handed them out to all her friends at recess.

One day Elizabeth and Hilda followed me halfway home, singing that terrible song

"Jolly Molly,
Your eyes are awf'ly small.
Jolly Molly,
Your nose is awf'ly tall."
I started to run
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 23, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    a lovely story

    Molly, a Jewish girl, and her family have moved to America from Russia. Her mother says that the reason was to escape religious persecution and find freedom. First they lived in a tenement house in New York and Papa worked in a factory. Then they came to Winter Hill where Papa works in Mr. Brodsky's store and they live in the apartment above. However, the children in Molly's third-grade class make fun of her accent and clothes. Molly even thinks about going back to Russia. At Thanksgiving the teacher says that everyone is supposed to bring a Pilgrim doll to class. The doll that Molly's mother makes looks like a Russian peasant girl, not at all like the Pilgrims Molly has seen in her schoolbook. Molly is embarrassed and afraid that she will never fit in with her classmates now. What will she do?<BR/> This is a lovely story which reminds children, and the rest of us too, that all Americans are in a sense "pilgrims." In spite of our different backgrounds, there is one thing that we share in common, and that is the freedom which this great nation affords us. Therefore, we should respect one another. Of course, at Thanksgiving time we mst never forget the great foundation laid for our country's liberty by "The Pilgrims" who landed in 1620. However, we should also be aware of the contributions made by those who have come to this land seeking refuge in the years since then. Molly's Pilgrim is a wonderful addition to the literature about Thanksgiving for beginning readers. The author, Barbara Cohen (1932-1992), also wrote several other acclaimed picture books and novels for young readers.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 24, 2013

    Find out what a true pilgrim is, in this adorable Thanksgiving s

    Find out what a true pilgrim is, in this adorable Thanksgiving story for young children. Molly is a little Russian girl, whose family immigrated to America. Because of her family's background, their accent, and Jewish ways... the other girls in school tease her. Molly is still learning about American things all the time. Thanksgiving is something new to her, but she quickly discovers what it means.

    The third-grade class is celebrating the special holiday by creating a small diorama village of Pilgrims &amp; Indians. Molly feels out of place when everything she does in school turns out different than the other students. The other kids think they know more about Thanksgiving &amp; Pilgrims than Molly does, because she's new.

    What does Molly do, that shows the students what Thanksgiving means to her?

    Read this cute little book to find out what it must be like for a young girl from Russia to blend in with other children. &quot;Molly's Pilgrim&quot; is written for a 3rd Grade Reading Level. I'd recommend it to any little kids, who are eager to read a Thanksgiving story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2007

    My review on Molly's Pilgrim

    Hey everyone, I guess you want to know what this book is about? It¿s about a little girl named Molly she just moved in the city and is new at her school. She hates it because every kid picks on her, they say she¿s the odd one out she doesn¿t like it and wants to go back to her old home. Her mom says they can¿t but, if they could they would. The next day she went to school and had to go threw the same thing again, she went to her class and her teacher said they had to do a project for homework, they asked what is it? She replied ¿you have to make dolls¿, ¿the boys make Indians and the girls make Pilgrims¿. Molly asked the teacher what a Pilgrim is. She told her and when she came home she had told her mom if she could help her on the project, of course her mom said don¿t worry I¿ll do it for you. So her mom helped her work on the doll. The next evening she went to school with her doll Pilgrim and all the girls made fun of her doll and she defended her self by telling them why it would be a Pilgrim. Her teacher helps her explain and everyone realizes there are different kinds of Pilgrims. Now her day was not like the others. I think that all ages can read this but I¿m sure that adults wouldn¿t want to read this because they like news.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2003

    Fantastic Book

    A must read for the upcoming holiday...It makes students aware that we are all different yet we are all alike too. I can't say enough about this book....thanks to my mentor teacher who introduced it to me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2001

    Incredilble book for your grade schooler!

    A little Russian girl learns discovers what it is to be a pilgrim by making a pilgrim doll. It looks different than the typical American pilgrim doll and she is ridiculed by other children. In the end she learns about her 'pilgrim' doll and about being OK in a strange land.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)