Momo

( 2 )

Overview


The Neverending Story is Michael Ende’s best-known book, but Momo—published six years earlier—is the all-ages fantasy novel that first won him wide acclaim. After the sweet-talking gray men come to town, life becomes terminally efficient. Can Momo, a young orphan girl blessed with the gift of listening, vanquish the ashen-faced time thieves before joy vanishes forever? With gorgeous new drawings by Marcel Dzama and a new translation from the German by Lucas Zwirner, this all-new 40th anniversary edition ...
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Momo

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Overview


The Neverending Story is Michael Ende’s best-known book, but Momo—published six years earlier—is the all-ages fantasy novel that first won him wide acclaim. After the sweet-talking gray men come to town, life becomes terminally efficient. Can Momo, a young orphan girl blessed with the gift of listening, vanquish the ashen-faced time thieves before joy vanishes forever? With gorgeous new drawings by Marcel Dzama and a new translation from the German by Lucas Zwirner, this all-new 40th anniversary edition celebrates the book’s first U.S. publication in over 25 years.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Wittily perceptive social criticism and haunting, surrealistic imagery... This all-ages delight deserves rescue and is ideal for classroom (or bedtime) read-alouds—especially if the grown-ups pay attention along with the children.” —Kirkus

“A modern classic for all ages.”—ForeWord Review

"A German Classic returns to print"—Publishers Weekly

"A wonderful new translation with simple, gorgeous illustrations by Marcel Dzama. A masterpiece." —The Globe and Mail

"If there was only one children’s book I could put on the list of must-read, yet hardly known, children’s books, it would have to be Momo. I fell in love with the book, despite the fact that when I first went to read it, I assumed I wouldn’t like it at all!"—LitKidz

"A joyful read."––About.com

"Here is a story so ingenious in its conception, so powerful in production that its message can safely slip unnoticed into the mind to linger after the splendid images begin to fade." — The Times Literary Supplement

From the Publisher
“Wittily perceptive social criticism and haunting, surrealistic imagery... This all-ages delight deserves rescue and is ideal for classroom (or bedtime) read-alouds—especially if the grown-ups pay attention along with the children.” —Kirkus

“A modern classic for all ages.”—ForeWord Review

"A German Classic returns to print"—Publishers Weekly

"A wonderful new translation with simple, gorgeous illustrations by Marcel Dzama. A masterpiece." —The Globe and Mail

"If there was only one children’s book I could put on the list of must-read, yet hardly known, children’s books, it would have to be Momo. I fell in love with the book, despite the fact that when I first went to read it, I assumed I wouldn’t like it at all!"—LitKidz

"A joyful read."––About.com

"Here is a story so ingenious in its conception, so powerful in production that its message can safely slip unnoticed into the mind to linger after the splendid images begin to fade." — The Times Literary Supplement

VOYA - Jennifer Miskec
In a small, friendly town, in the ruins of an old amphitheater, lives Momo, a young orphan girl with an uncanny ability to listen. The friendly townspeople take care of Momo, bringing her food and making her a stove and a bed, and in return Momo listens, resolving conflict and allowing imaginations to flourish. But when gray men start to show up, the pace of the town changes. Everything becomes more efficient; no time is wasted. As a result, the adults become too busy for the children, and there is no longer any time to "waste" thinking, telling stories, or just listening to one another. To save her town, Momo goes on a magical journey to the realm of Master Secundius Minutius Hora, who teaches Momo about appreciating special times and not clock time. When Momo can teach this to the rest of the town, the gray men no longer have human accomplices and are defeated. Though Ende is more well known for his novel (and its filmic adaptation) The Neverending Story, Momo is the novel that first earned him literary acclaim. This edition celebrates Momo's fortieth anniversary with a new translation and new illustrations. Despite being forty years old, Ende's critique of contemporary culture—efficiency over quality, arbitrary deadlines instead of organic intervals, and even technology (like radios and books on tape) over human interaction—still rings true. Ende's story is heavy handed and will probably be more attractive to luddite adults than teen readers, though light fantasy and Ende fans might be intrigued by Ende's fairy-tale worlds. Reviewer: Jennifer Miskec
Children's Literature - Judy Silverman
Momo is a young girl of indeterminate age living alone in the forest. When she first arrived, the adults from the nearby community came to see her, wanting to help, but they soon realized the only things she needed were material things, so they donated a stove, a bed, and some warm clothing. But the children of the community soon came to depend on her. "Nothing's fun without Momo," they would say. She never told them what to do, but any way of playing that she suggested always turned into great fun. But one day a veritable army of gray men appears. They are time thieves, and they begin their operations by convincing people that time must be saved. The saved time, they say, will be put in account for later use. For some reason, the adults fall for this. Men who had loved their work and never worried whether they were on time or not suddenly feel that they must produce more (of whatever it is they produce,) and must produce it faster. There is no longer time for family or friends or anything but work. And the children get assigned to factories, but they are never sure just why they are there, or why their work is important. They simply must save time—by the second, if possible. And Momo? Well, Momo is deserted. No one comes to see her anymore, and so she determines to go and find out why. She finally discovers the man who is in charge of time. With his help, and the help of his tortoise, she manages to save the day. This is a fun read, a little confusing, but on the whole worth it. Reviewer: Judy Silverman
Kirkus Reviews
The 40th-anniversary edition of a beloved German fable carries a pointed message that might already be too late. Momo, a homeless, parentless waif of undetermined age in a nameless European city, is blessed with the gift of listening--"with utmost attention and sympathy"--and adopted by her humble neighbors as a treasured member of their community. Then the sinister gray men arrive, persuading everyone to "save time" by abandoning such idle pleasures as friendship and play. The townsfolk become obsessed with efficiency and shallow consumption, their lives stripped of dreams, beauty and joy. Targeted by the gray men, Momo escapes to the very heart of time to discover the secrets that will rescue her friends. The heavy-handed moral is impossible to miss, but the tale is saved from being preachy by wittily perceptive social criticism and haunting, surrealistic imagery. Despite some mild profanities, this new translation is more graceful and whimsical than the 1985 edition, though lacking its old-fashioned charm; the dark and dreary pen-and-ink illustrations do not improve on the earlier simple line drawings. Nonetheless, this all-ages delight deserves rescue and is ideal for classroom (or bedtime) read-alouds--especially if the grown-ups pay attention along with the children. (Fantasy. 10 & up)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781938073144
  • Publisher: McSweeney's Publishing
  • Publication date: 8/13/2013
  • Edition description: Anniversary Edition
  • Edition number: 40
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 158,286
  • Age range: 12 - 18 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author


Michael Ende (1929–1995) was a German writer of literature, fantasy, and children’s books. Most famous for his novels The Neverending Story, Jim Button and Luke the Engine Driver, and Momo, Ende considered his works relevant for all ages. He remains one of the most popular German novelists of the twentieth century.

Marcel Dzama is an artist, born in Canada, who lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Lucas Zwirner is a writer and translator. Born in New York City, he graduated from Yale University in 2013, where he studied Philosophy and Comparative Literature.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 21, 2013

    Momo is a young orphan girl living by herself in an abandoned am

    Momo is a young orphan girl living by herself in an abandoned amphitheater who has many friends from town because Momo listens. Momo is so good at listening that people from town come to tell her their troubles and Momo makes them feel good again. Momo also helps kids imagine. But it all changes when the “gray men” come to town and start to convince the townspeople to “save” time by doing things very quickly. In reality, everyone who agrees loses time and becomes super grumpy! No one visits Momo anymore except for the kids, who have no where else to go. Momo realizes she must save everyone from the gray men.

    This edition of Momo is a 40th anniversary edition (just released yesterday!) and it is a MUST READ book. The plot of this book is very unlike anything I’ve read. It is unique and fun to read. I love Master Hora, the guy in charge of keeping time going. He’s cool. I like the idea of the gray men as bad guys. They are really creepy. Momo is a great character. I like her “power!” I wish I had a power like that. I love the adventure in this book! I really like Cassiopeia, Master Hora’s turtle, which can see exactly 30 minutes into the future and she can also “talk” by having letters appear on her shell to spell out sentences. I find that very cool. The illustrations scattered through the book are awesome. I like the last picture – Cassiopeia showing two words that appear only to the readers – The End!
    *NOTE* This book was given to me in exchange for an honest review.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2015

    A gripping, unique and thought-provoking, this book is a true cl

    A gripping, unique and thought-provoking, this book is a true classic.
    It has eerie villains and a fantastic plot. Really worth a read, for children and adults alike.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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