Mona Lisa Overdrive

( 24 )

Overview

William Gibson, author of the extraordinary multiaward-winning novel Neuromancer, has written his most brilliant and thrilling work to date…

Mona Lisa Overdrive

Enter Gibson’s unique world – lyric and mechanical, erotic and violent, sobering and exciting – where multinational corporations and high-tech outlaws vie for power, traveling into the computer-generated universe known as cyberspace. Into this world comes Mona, a young girl with a murky...

See more details below
Audiobook (MP3 on CD - Unabridged)
$13.49
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$14.99 List Price
Other sellers (Audiobook)
  • All (3) from $8.54   
  • New (2) from $8.54   
  • Used (1) from $13.48   
Mona Lisa Overdrive

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

William Gibson, author of the extraordinary multiaward-winning novel Neuromancer, has written his most brilliant and thrilling work to date…

Mona Lisa Overdrive

Enter Gibson’s unique world – lyric and mechanical, erotic and violent, sobering and exciting – where multinational corporations and high-tech outlaws vie for power, traveling into the computer-generated universe known as cyberspace. Into this world comes Mona, a young girl with a murky past and an uncertain future whose life is on a collision course with internationally famous Sense/Net star Angie Mitchell. Since childhood, Angie has been able to tap into cyberspace without a computer. Now from inside cyberspace, a kidnapping plot is masterminded by a phantom entity who has plans for Mona, Angie, and all humanity, plans that cannot be controlled…or even known. And behind the intrigue lurks the shadowy Yakuza, the powerful Japanese underworld, whose leaders ruthlessly manipulate people and events to suit their own purposes…or so they think.

The award-winning William Gibson goes beyond science fiction to the broader mainstream fiction audience. His unique world features multinational corporations and high-tech outlaws vying for power, traveling the computer-generated universe.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Gibson burst upon the scene in 1984 with Neuromancer, a revolutionary, innovative novel that not only gathered up just about every award in the SF field, but also virtually invented a new sub-genre, which has come to be called ``cyberpunk.'' He followed it with Count Zero , set in the same neon-lit, over-urbanized, polluted, high-tech future; an even better novel, it was necessarily not as breathtakingly unfamiliar and inventive as the first. This new novel completes the series, following the lives of some of the characters from the previous books (Bobby Newmark, Count Zero himself, is here) as well as many new ones, particularly Angie Mitchell, star of simstims and idol of millions, who is intuitively sensitive to cyberspace and the vodun deities that are its manifestations. Told in a gorgeous, highly compressedalmost poeticstyle that requires the reader's attention and intelligence, this very satisfying novel can stand on its own. Major ad/promo; author tour. (Nov.)
Library Journal
Able to enter the vast data network known as ``cyberspace'' at will, Sense/Net celebrity Angie Mitchell becomes the center of a bizarre kidnap/murder scheme in which her only allies are the daughter of a Japanese mobster, a cybernetically enhanced assassin, and a computer ``cowboy'' who lives entirely in the confines of cyberspace. Gibson's dazzling, high-tech prose enhances the drama of this sequel to Count Zero . Recommended for sf collections. JC
Thomas Disch
The new novel has plenty of flash...quick, high-intensity glimpses that linger on the retina of the imagination. -- New York Times Book Review
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781480542365
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Publication date: 10/1/2013
  • Format: MP3 on CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Sales rank: 1,400,308
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Williams Gibson was the first author to win the Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick award also known as the “triple crown” of Science Fiction, on his debut novel Neuromancer. He lives in Canada and continues to write award winning critically acclaimed science fiction.

Biography

Science fiction owes an enormous debt to William Gibson, the cyberpunk pioneer who revolutionized the genre with his startling stories of tough, alienated loners adrift in a world of sinister high technology.

Gibson was born in Conway, South Carolina, and spent much of his youth in Virginia with his widowed mother. He grew up shy and bookish, discovering science fiction and the literature of the beats at a precociously early age. When he was 15, he was sent away to private school in Arizona, but he left without graduating when his mother died suddenly. He fled to Canada to avoid the draft and immersed himself in '60s counterculture. He married, moved to British Columbia, and enrolled in college, graduating in 1977 with a degree in English. Around this time he began to write in earnest, combining his lifelong love of science fiction and his newfound passion for the punk music evolving in New York and London.

In the early 1980s, Gibson met writer and punk musician John Shirley and sci-fi authors Lewis Shiner and Bruce Sterling. All three were blown away by the power and originality of Gibson's stories, and together the four men went on to forge a radical new literary movement called cyberpunk. In 1984, Gibson's groundbreaking first novel, Neuromancer, was published. Daring and revolutionary, it envisioned such techno-marvels as AI, virtual reality, genetic engineering, and multinational capitalism years before they became realities. Although it was not an immediate sensation, Neuromancer struck a chord with hardcore sci-fi fans who turned it into a word-of-mouth hit. Then it won the Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards (the Triple Crown of Science Fiction), catapulting Gibson into superstardom overnight.

Even if he had never written another word, Gibson's impact would be clearly seen in the works of such cutting-edge contemporary authors as Neal Stephenson, Pat Cadigan, and Paul DiFilippo. But, as it is, Neuromancer was just the beginning -- the first book in an inspired trilogy that has come to be considered a benchmark in the history of the genre; and since then, Gibson has gone on to create even more visionary science fiction, including The Difference Engine, a steampunk classic co-authored with Bruce Sterling, and such imaginative post-9/11 cyber thrillers as Pattern Recognition and Spook Country .

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      William Ford Gibson (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 17, 1948
    2. Place of Birth:
      Conway, South Carolina
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of British Columbia, 1977

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 24 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2004

    Exciting yet unsatisfying conclusion to Sprawl trilogy

    In Mona Lisa Overdrive, cyberpunk godfather William Gibson attempts to bring his high-flying Sprawl trilogy to a soft landing. Gibson re-introduces characters from the first two books of the series (Neuromancer and Count Zero) and brings them together with new characters while continuing to pursue his loose plot involving the evolution of artifical life. Gibson paints a bleak near-future landscape and populates it with edgy characters. The plot moves at a brisk clip, and Gibson's prose is typically poetic, but the ending, like those of many of Gibson's offerings, is unsatisfying. It still won't distract you from enjoying an otherwise great read.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 4, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Doesn't age well

    Borrow it or go to the library, but definitely read it before you buy it. Everything I read about this book painted is as some kind of revolutionary book that screams cyberpunk. I couldn't find the cyber. As for the punk, I don't know where it was hiding. I think 10-15 years ago this book would have blown minds. In 2009 it's rife with antique ideas and a limited view of cyber-society. I think the whole point of this novel was to wow the reader with crazy future inventions like "downloadable interactive movies" (MMO anyone) the proliferation of drugs (oh and plastic surgery). Like any older "future" story the future is stranger than they ever imagined. I like fantasy, I like some sci-fi, and I'm a fan of alternate reality fiction. For me it was like reading circa 1900 story about futuristic steam powered cars.

    1 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 29, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Mona Lisa Overdrive by William Gibson Mona Lisa Overdrive is a

    Mona Lisa Overdrive by William Gibson

    Mona Lisa Overdrive is a cyberpunk novel by William Gibson published in 1988 and the final novel of the Sprawl trilogy, following Neuromancer and Count Zero.

    Taking place eight years after the events of Count Zero and fifteen years after Neuromancer, the story is formed from several interconnecting plot threads.

    A young Japanese girl named Kumiko, daughter of a Yakuza boss is sent to London to keep her safe while her father engages in a gang war with other top Yakuza leaders. In London she is cared for by one of her father's retainers, Roger Swain, who is also a powerful member of the London Mob. She meets Molly Millions (having altered her appearance and now calling herself "Sally Shears", in order to conceal her identity from hostile parties who are implied to be pursuing her), who takes the girl under her wing.

    A reclusive artist named Slick Henry, who lives in a place named Factory in the Dog Solitude; a large, poisoned expanse of deserted factories and dumps, perhaps in New Jersey. Slick Henry is a convicted (and punished) car thief. As a result of the repetitive brainwashing nature of his punishment, he spends his days creating large robotic sculptures and periodically suffers episodes of time loss, returning to consciousness afterward with no memory of what he did during the blackout. His friends Gentry and Little Gird, help him take care of the place. He is hired by Kid Afrika, to whom he owes a big favor, to look after the comatose "Count" (Bobby Newmark from the second novel, Count Zero, who has hooked himself into a super-capacity cyber-harddrive called an Aleph). A theoretical "Aleph" would have the RAM capacity to literally contain all of reality, enough that a memory construct of a person would contain the complete personality of the individual and allow it to learn, grow and act independently. The "Count" comes with a med tech, Cherry Chesterfield.

    Mona, (Mona Lisa) an innocent young prostitute who has a more-than-passing resemblance to famed Simstim superstar Angie Mitchell. Her pimp, Eddy, sells her to perform a "gig" which later turns out to be part of a plot to abduct Angie. She is given plastic surgery by Gerald Chin, who turns Mona into Angie.

    Angela (Angie) Mitchell, famous simstim star and the girl from the second Sprawl novel Count Zero. Angie, thanks to brain manipulations by her father when she was a child, has always had the ability to access cyberspace directly (without a cyberspace deck), but drugs provided by her production company Sense/Net have severely impeded this ability.

    The story is told from the third person point of view, but half the time I did not know who was "she" or "he". It reads slowly, but perhaps it had a lot to do with the fact that I did not read the book in its intended order...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 28, 2009

    William Gibson is one of the authors that has stepped over the line of political correctness in literature.

    Mona Lisa Overdrive is a very interesting novel. I do have to say William Gibson is one of the authors that has stepped over the line of political correctness in literature. The way he throws around sexuality and curse words is distasteful, even if it creates a realistic environment in our current time. I hate to say it, but his style facilitates the presentation of some very intuitive concepts about the world today. The creativity in the plot and new genre is impeccably different. Most stories have been told before but with a little different plot each time, however reading this book had me curious what was going to happen next. Mona Lisa Overdrive is hard to get into, especially if you have not read a William Gibson book before. Gibson uses this technique of writing two or more stories and them splitting them up into chapters. After that he intertwines them to make a book. This makes it especially hard for procrastinators like me to read his books because once they get back to reading the book, they forget what happened and need to reread. This book has four stories going on at once which makes it hard to get into and understand. Another thing that makes Gibson's books hard to read is his metaphors that go on for .oh about half a page, which is another short attention span folly of the currant generations.
    Conclusively I state, that the more you read his books, the easier they are to comprehend and follow. Personally, I secretly started to enjoy the formatting of his books because it added an element of mystery to my love of sifi. Although, If I were to rate this book on a scale from 1 to 5, I would give it a 3 because it is not very reader friendly.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)