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Monday is One Day
     

Monday is One Day

by Arthur A. Levine, Julian Hector (Illustrator)
 

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One by one, the days of the week roll by. Monday is one day, Tuesday is blue shoes day, and Wednesday is halfway day.

When Saturday and Sunday finally come, it's time for little ones and the adults who love them to play, share, and celebrate. Every day of the week offers a special opportunity for families to enjoy being together!

Overview


One by one, the days of the week roll by. Monday is one day, Tuesday is blue shoes day, and Wednesday is halfway day.

When Saturday and Sunday finally come, it's time for little ones and the adults who love them to play, share, and celebrate. Every day of the week offers a special opportunity for families to enjoy being together!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Most working parents of young children will be on board with Levine (All the Lights in the Night) from the very first line of his new book: "The hardest part of going to work is being apart from you." So how do kids and grownups make waiting for the weekend less onerous? Levine suggests assigning a special value to each day of the workweek: "Monday is one day:/ One safe snuggly cuddle./ Tuesday's blue shoes day:/ Two stomps in a puddle"). Wednesday is "halfway day" and Friday cleverly becomes (for male parents at least) "last-tie day," with the choice left up to the child. Hector's (The Gentleman Bug) strong, sure ink lines, bold colors, and subtle textures invite readers into a variety of homes and families (urban and rural, black and white, gay and straight), while conveying a domestic world of solidity and warmth. In these high-achieving, résumé-building times, it's refreshing to see a book that believes that life is not about what you do but who you come home to—and how you enjoy your time together. Ages 3–5. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—While it is difficult for parents who work outside the home to part from their children, Levine assures youngsters that a work week does eventually end, and that each day affords an opportunity for some special time together. Monday allows for "one safe snuggly cuddle," Tuesday for "two stomps in a puddle," and so on until the weekend arrives with time for more extended activities. Readers will enjoy the brief, rhyming text, printed in different colors that match the artist's palette, and the invitation to "count the days" (and objects pictured). But there is much more for them to glean from the mixed-media cartoon illustrations, mostly spreads, offering aerial and close-up views of the town and its inhabitants. The cover alludes to the cyclical nature of time as it portrays the different family constellations that appear within the book. Youngsters are subtly introduced to diverse ethnic representation, grandparents as primary caregivers, a child who has two fathers, and single parents, with a reprise of all the families in a park scene at the end. From breaking dawn to sunrise to the rising of the moon in the evening, whether they work in an office, on a farm, or engage in other kinds of labor, these adults share their love for their children and eagerness to spend time with them. This is a fine vehicle for discussion of different family groupings, kinds of work, and separation anxiety.—Marianne Saccardi, formerly at Norwalk Community College, CT
Kirkus Reviews
Leaving their kids to go to work every Monday morning is hard for parents. By turning the week into an upbeat countdown, working dad Levine shows how to make the days speed by, especially when each one brings something special to share. Speaking in the first-person, parental voice, Levine relies on rhyme to propel the spare text through the days of the week, starting with Monday when parent and child share a "snuggly cuddle." Tuesday's for wearing blue shoes and taking "two stomps in a puddle." "Halfway" Wednesday triggers "three raspberries on the nose," while Thursday's reserved for "four T. Rex growls." Friday's for choosing that last necktie of the week, and weekends are all about family fun. Hector's watercolor-and-pencil illustrations sport strong outlines, simple shapes and basic reds, blues, yellows and greens to evoke a warm, comfortable, retro feeling of family togetherness. Opening and closing with an aerial view of city, suburbs and countryside, the endpapers and title pages set the stage for the day-by-day countdown. By including traditional urban, suburban and rural families as well as single parents and same-sex couples, the illustrations positively reinforce the reassuring message that all parents "count the ways" to be with their kids "the whole week through." Hits the spot for families with working parents. (Picture book. 3-5)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439789257
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/31/2015
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
754,193
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 9.80(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Meet the Author


Arthur A. Levine is the author of several books for children. His most recent picture book, Monday Is One Day, was hailed by Caldecott Honor medalist, Brian Selznick, as a "delightful book," and was lauded by Booklist magazine in a starred review as "that rare book perceptive enough to recognize that the random moments are those we treasure most." Arthur has been a children’s book publisher and editor for twenty-five years. Mr. Levine lives in New Jersey with his family.

Julian Hector is a graduate of the Parsons School of Design. His titles include The Little Matador and This is the Firefighter. He currently resides in New York City.

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