Money Boy

( 1 )

Overview


An American Library Association Youth Media Award Stonewall Honor Book

Ray Liu knows he should be happy. He lives in a big suburban house with all the latest electronic gadgets, and even finds plenty of time to indulge in his love of gaming. He needs the escape. It’s tough getting grades that will please his army veteran father when speaking English is still a struggle. But when his father accesses Ray’s Internet account and discovers Ray has been cruising gay websites, his ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (25) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $7.99   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Money Boy

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$8.49
BN.com price
(Save 14%)$9.95 List Price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview


An American Library Association Youth Media Award Stonewall Honor Book

Ray Liu knows he should be happy. He lives in a big suburban house with all the latest electronic gadgets, and even finds plenty of time to indulge in his love of gaming. He needs the escape. It’s tough getting grades that will please his army veteran father when speaking English is still a struggle. But when his father accesses Ray’s Internet account and discovers Ray has been cruising gay websites, his belongings are thrown on the front lawn and suddenly he's homeless. Angry and defiant, Ray heads to the city. In short order he is robbed, beaten up, and seduced, and he learns the hard realities of life on the street. Could he really sell himself for sex? Lots of people use their bodies to make money — athletes, actors, models, pop singers. If no one gets hurt, why should anyone care?

A 2012 Stonewall Children's & Young Adult Literature Honor Book

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Charla Hollingsworth
Ray Liu has many obstacles in his life. He is a new immigrant from China to Toronto, Canada; he does not speak English well; he has trouble in high school; he does not get along with his father and stepmother, and he is gay—a secret he has kept from his family. His father observes him surfing gay websites on the computer and gets very angry. As a result of the confrontation, Ray's father throws him out of the house. Ray thinks life on the streets will be easy—he has his phone, money in his pocket, a few clothes, his laptop, and money in the bank. He spends a week living on the streets and in shelters. Throughout the week, Ray begins to lose hope and faith when he is robbed of his identity documents, laptop, and money. In desperation, Ray turns to an older male for comfort and to make money for food. This too turns out to be less than Ray hoped, as the man he thought was a friend is a male prostitution pimp. As Ray is contemplating a life as a money boy (male prostitute), his father re-enters his life and offers him a way to return home. Money Boy is a poignant tale about immigrant life and life as a homosexual teen. It will provide much food for thought for students who are struggling to tell their true nature to their family and friends. Unfortunately, much of the language is stilted, as if an immigrant were writing the story, and this distracts from a fluid reading of the novel. Reviewer: Charla Hollingsworth
Kirkus Reviews

After four years in Canada, Ray Liu is stressed out. On top of his parents' divorce in China, his father's remarriage, learning English and struggling in high school, Ray faces another challenge: he's gay.

Playing online war games is Ray's safety valve, the one place he feels valued and successful. When his Chinese Army–vet father discovers Ray's been visiting gay websites, he kicks Ray out of the house, tossing his clothes after him. Furious, Ray avoids seeking help from friends—none know of his sexual orientation—and heads to downtown Toronto. Within days he'll be robbed, beaten, befriended, solicited and left with a decision to make: whether to become a "money boy," joining the ranks of Toronto's teen male prostitutes. Though not entirely sympathetic, Ray is compelling and believable; many of his frustrations are universal to adolescence: peer acceptance, family expectations. For Ray's family and friends, contemporary immigrants who—thanks to cell phones and the Internet—remain closely connected to their first home, straddling cultures raises unique identity and assimilation issues. Yee effectively shows how Ray's birth culture is unaccepting of homosexual identity and his acquired one, at best, is in transition. An ending that feels a tad unearned does not materially undermine the text.

Overall, this insightful and deeply felt novel makes a valuable contribution to an underexplored topic and is highly recommended. (Fiction. 14 & up)

From the Publisher

“Yee’s sophisticated juxtaposition of immigrant narratives with questions of sexual identity is compelling and poignant.” — School Library Journal
Children's Literature - Kristy Kilfoyle
Ray Liu has been in Canada long enough to have adjusted to his new life. But nothing could be farther from the truth. His friendships are superficial at best and school is simply time spent away from his real home in an online gaming world. When Ray's traditional, veteran father finds out his son has been surfing gay sites, he turns Ray out onto the streets. With virtually no one to turn to, Ray quickly finds himself without money, relying on the shelter system in Toronto and considering using the only thing he has to earn money—his body. Ray locates a popular restaurant in the gay area of town and it provides a safe haven in the midst of his chaotic and dangerous situation. Liu writes honestly, refusing to wrap his story with a pat conclusion. His themes are not for the faint of heart, but perfect for older teens, who are confident exploring the grittier side of life. Best for urban libraries with collections of similar material. Reviewer: Kristy Kilfoyle
ALAN Review - Tory Cortes
Ray has recently emigrated with his family from China because his father, Ba, believes there will be more opportunities available to them in Canada. However, after discovering his son's homosexuality, Ba forces Ray out of the house and onto the streets where he must fend for himself. In a journey in which he discovers the different aspects of being a Chinese immigrant and a homosexual man, Ray sells his body on the streets in order to survive. Living away from home, he learns appreciation for both the values of his old life and those of the previously unfamiliar world outside of his family. Yee's novel explores a variety of social and moral issues, such as immigration, homosexuality, and the power of money. Through his naive protagonist, Yee makes connections between wealth and virtues like honor and freedom, raising questions about what it means to truly possess these qualities. Reviewer: Tory Cortes
School Library Journal
Gr 10 Up—Eighteen-year-old Ray Liu, a Chinese immigrant, leads a privileged life. He lives in a large suburban home, wears trendy clothing, and is equipped with the latest technologies. However, none of these things mitigate Ray's difficulties with fitting in at his Canadian high school; pleasing his strict army veteran father; and accepting his sexuality. Ray's struggle with speaking English makes it especially hard for him to adjust to life in a new country. As a means of escape, he immerses himself in a computer role-playing game, Rebel State; even though other aspects of his life appear to be in flux, the game makes Ray feel in control. But the feeling soon evaporates when his father accesses Ray's computer and discovers that he has been surfing gay websites. The repercussions are swift, and the teen is disowned. He heads to downtown Toronto and promptly receives an education in the harsh realities of street life. He is robbed, beaten, and taken in by Han, an older man with ulterior motives. Yee's sophisticated juxtaposition of immigrant narratives with questions of sexual identity is compelling and poignant. Unfortunately, stilted dialogue and an all-too-neat ending defying credibility detract from the authenticity of this story.—Lalitha Nataraj, Escondido Public Library, CA
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781554980949
  • Publisher: Groundwood Books
  • Publication date: 8/23/2011
  • Pages: 192
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • Lexile: HL590L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author


Paul Yee is an award-winning writer. He lives in Toronto.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 23, 2012

    Money Boy tells a fairly unconvincing story about a very unlikab

    Money Boy tells a fairly unconvincing story about a very unlikable character. There are many better titles that represent immigrant teens, gay teens, and gay immigrant teens. And for the really offensive suggestion that the "Children's Literature" reviewer made--that this book is "best for urban libraries with collections of similar material," I'm gobsmacked. Of course, there are no gay teens in rural areas and rural teens shouldn't read about gay teens? And if the library isn't already stocked with literature featuring gay characters, apparently don't start now? Sheesh!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)