Money Enough: Everyday Practices for Living Faithfully in the Global Economy

Overview

Reflections for Christians for dealing with money in a consumer-driven world

In this much-needed book Douglas Hicks looks at how Christian faith applies to the practices of economic life-spending, saving, giving especially as an alternative to a life of unbridled consumerism. This book offers reflections for people of faith and anyone who wants to connect their Monday through Saturday lives with their faith and live a more integrated way. It takes a look at how to realistically ...

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Overview

Reflections for Christians for dealing with money in a consumer-driven world

In this much-needed book Douglas Hicks looks at how Christian faith applies to the practices of economic life-spending, saving, giving especially as an alternative to a life of unbridled consumerism. This book offers reflections for people of faith and anyone who wants to connect their Monday through Saturday lives with their faith and live a more integrated way. It takes a look at how to realistically apply Christian principles in these especially perilous economic times.

  • Explores how Christians can rethink their practices of faith as consumers, investors, and earners
  • Offers reflections on an important Christian concept in a practical, lively, and engaging style
  • Contains ideas for meeting the everyday pressures, questions, and anxieties of economic life as they connect with Christian faith
  • A new volume in the Practices of Faith Series

The book is filled with the author's level-headed, thoughtful reflections on Christian practices of getting and spending.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Money Enough, is from Douglas Hicks, a professor of religionand leadership at the University of Richmond who is also aPresbyterian minister. Having completed his doctoral work atHarvard under the noted theologian Ronald Thiemann and the NobelPrize-winning economist Amartya Sen, Hicks is the sort of preacherwho is well prepared to navigate the complicated terrain ofliterature in theology, ethics and economics. He does so in a voicethat's refreshingly accessible. Hicks catches readers up on bestpractices from the field of economics and connects them to theBible and John Calvin.

Still, Hicks is clear that the lessons of economics do notalways line up easily with the teachings of Jesus. The "Christianeconomic ethic we find in the Bible is focused primarily on aneconomy based on person-to-person relationships." So many of thethings Jesus said ("Give to whoever asks" comes to mind) seemimpractical in a global economy where half the population lives onless than $2 a day but most of us never spend significant time withpeople outside our economic class and education bracket.

What are we to do with the particular instructions from Mosesand Jesus about how to handle our money? Hicks's answer is that thewitness of scripture as a whole calls us to shift from"econocentrism" to a God-centered view of life that "acknowledgesthe importance of economic well-being without making it ultimate."By their very nature, markets do not believe that all people arecreated equal. They assume instead that every dollar is equal. Buta God-centered perspective invites us to see that of God ineveryone. The trick is somehow to harness the power of money andleverage our access in the global economy for the sake of peoplewho are overlooked and excluded.

Hicks admits that this is not easy. In every sphere of ourmaterial lives, a shift is needed—from acquisition todevelopment, from the pursuit of happiness to the pursuit ofwell-being, from breadwinning to stewardship, from wasting time toSabbath delight. Hicks should be commended for getting practical atboth the global and the household level. (The ONE Campaign is good,but so is microlending; simplicity matters, but so does genderjustice.) Like healthy eating, economic faithfulness, by Hicks'saccount, is hard but doable. Every shift is movement in the rightdirection. We're on a journey. Best to celebrate progress, even ifit comes in small steps.
—Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, The Christian Century, 5.4.10

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780787997755
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 2/8/2010
  • Series: Practices of Faith Series, #22
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Douglas A. Hicks is a writer and professor whose doctoral work at Harvard under noted theologian Ronald Thiemann and Nobel Prize-winning economist Amartya Sen combined religion, ethics, and economics. He teaches at the University of Richmond in Richmond, Virginia, and is a Presbyterian minister.

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Table of Contents

Editor's Foreword.

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

1. Surviving.

2. Valuing.

3. Discerning Desires.

4. Providing.

5. Laboring.

6. Recreating.

7. Expanding the Community.

8. Doing Justice.

9. Sharing.

Notes.

The Author.

Index.

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2011

    Excellent resource for making sense of the economy!

    Douglas Hicks uses stories and economic ideas to explain how people should think about money and morality. It's written with theological language but is accessible for anyone interested in economic issues. And who isn't in this consumer-driven world? Get this book!

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  • Posted February 22, 2010

    Market Ethics Explained

    This book is perfect for anyone struggling to act ethically amidst the complexities of the global economy. Hicks lays out the staggering array of ethical questions facing consumers and producers today, and then offers clear insight (drawn from the Bible as well as classic economists and theologians) into practical ways to discern and carry principles of justice and equality into government policies and everyday market decisions. Hicks urges us not to view and value money and market goods as ends in themselves, but rather as tools to foster well-being for ourselves and others. Taken in this light, the market is no longer a place of fierce competition for scarce resources, but rather a way to exercise, enjoy, and share our God-given talents as well as the fruits they produce. Hicks also offers a very helpful analysis of value and desire. He charges us to consider deeply the distinction between "want and need" and match our spending habits to what we value most - and not the fleeting satisfactions of the latest fad or gadget. Overall this book is a very accessible and insightful exploration of market ethics. It'd be a great resource for group discussions.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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