Money Matters: Economics and the German Cultural Imagination, 1770-1850

Overview

In Money Matters: Economics and the German Cultural Imagination, 1770-1850, Richard Gray investigates the discourses of aesthetics and philosophy alongside economic thought, arguing that their domains are not mutually exclusive. The transition from an agrarian or proto-industrial economy to a capitalist industrial economy, which was paralleled by a shift from the exchange of specie to the use of paper currencies, occurred simultaneously with an efflorescence of German-language literature and philosophy. Based on ...
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Overview

In Money Matters: Economics and the German Cultural Imagination, 1770-1850, Richard Gray investigates the discourses of aesthetics and philosophy alongside economic thought, arguing that their domains are not mutually exclusive. The transition from an agrarian or proto-industrial economy to a capitalist industrial economy, which was paralleled by a shift from the exchange of specie to the use of paper currencies, occurred simultaneously with an efflorescence of German-language literature and philosophy. Based on close readings of canonical literary and philosophical texts, Gray explores how this confluence led to a rich cross-fertilization between economic and literary thought in Germany during this period.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780295988375
  • Publisher: University of Washington Press
  • Publication date: 11/1/2008
  • Series: Literary Conjugations Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 464
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Table of Contents

Pt. 1 Economics and Intellectual Culture

Ch. 1 Buying into Signs: Money and Semiosis in Eighteenth-Century German Language Theory 23

Ch. 2 Hypersign, Hypermoney, Hyperrnarket: Adam Muller's Theory of Money and Romantic Semiotics 48

Ch. 3 Economic Romanticism: Monetary Nationalism in Johann Gottlieb Fichte and Adam Muller 79

Ch. 4 Economics and the Imagination: Cultural Values and the Debate over Physiocracy in Germany, 1770-1789 109

Pt. 2 Literary Economies

Ch. 5 Counting on God: Economic Providentialism in Johann Heinrich Jung-Stilling's Lebensgeschichte 173

Ch. 6 Deep Pockets: The Economics and Poetics of Excess in Adelbert von Chamisso's Peter Schlemihl 230

Ch. 7 Red Herrings and Blue Smocks: Commercialism, Ecological Destruction, and Anti-Semitism in Annette von Droste-Hulshoff's Die Judenbuche 275

Ch. 8 The (Mis)Fortune of Commerce: Economic Transformation in Adalbert Stifter's Bergkristall 314

Conclusion: Limitless Faith in the Limitless: Money, Modernity, and the Economics/Aesthetics of Mediation in Goethe's Faust II 346

Notes 401

Bibliography 429

Index 455

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