The Money Men: Capitalism, Democracy, and the Hundred Years' War over the American Dollar

The Money Men: Capitalism, Democracy, and the Hundred Years' War over the American Dollar

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by H. W. Brands
     
 

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Acknowledgmentsviii
Preface1
Introduction: Film as Myth3
1Analyzing the Movie

Overview

Acknowledgmentsviii
Preface1
Introduction: Film as Myth3
1Analyzing the Movie Dream5
2Archetypes of Oz16
3Heroes and Villains26
4The Myth of the Birth of the Hero43
5Religious Symbolism in Film57
6The Monomyth71
7Archetype Evolution95
8Superheroes and Underdogs106
9The Personal Myth114
10The Modern Myths129
11The Horrors of Childhood141
12The American Family and Its Mechanisms of Defense155
13Characters in Crisis170
Conclusion: An Eclectic Approach to Film Analysis191
Filmography201
Bibliography215
Index217

Editorial Reviews

Michael Grunwald
very entertaining...a fine job
Publishers Weekly

The latent symbolism in film imagery can be psychoanalyzed just like the imagery in dreams. This work applies to film the psychoanalytic techniques of Sigmund Freud, Erik Erikson, Carl Jung, Alfred Adler, Joseph Campbell, Otto Rank and Rollo May, providing a fundamental understanding of film symbols and structure. It offers a comprehensive and eclectic approach to film analysis, using a broad variety of theories and examples from both classic and contemporary movies, from Dracula (1930) to American Beauty (1999). The final chapter applies all the previously discussed techniques to one film, Malcolm X (1992). The work boasts a filmography and bibliography and is illustrated with film stills.

Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

Kirkus Reviews
A lively and accessible history of a once-dominant issue in American life. The Federal Reserve Act of 1913, which governs US monetary policy, was a compromise solution to a long and fierce brawl between capitalists and democrats over money-what it is, who should control it and how it shapes the economy. And what a brawl it was. Brands (History/Univ. of Texas; Andrew Jackson, 2005, etc.) recounts the machinations of figures from Alexander Hamilton and Nicholas Biddle to William Jennings Bryan and J.P. Morgan as they engaged in a wildly careening struggle marked by much oratory, some bribery and motives ranging from noble to nefarious. Beginning with Hamilton's arguments for a national bank, Brands shows how the two camps developed. The capitalists argued for the stability and unity conferred by a centralized, well-managed money supply, while the democrats feared a strong central government as a threat to democracy. Tracing the shifting debate as the nation grew into an industrial power, Brands brings these men to life. We see one-third of the members of Congress profiting as charter shareholders of Hamilton's first Bank of the United States; Philadelphia mobs rioting against the second Bank of the United States, with Biddle, its director, barricading himself at home; and Jay Gould and James Fisk fleeing the financial district for their lives (to an opera house) after cornering the gold market and precipitating Black Friday, in 1869. Hounded but also feted-100,000 people watched Fisk's New York City funeral procession in 1872, while a brass band played-the 19th-century financiers played key roles in the rise of the rail and steel industries, battled Theodore Roosevelt and other progressivesand saw their heyday pass (even as J.P. Morgan died) in 1913, when President Wilson convinced Congress to create 12 privately capitalized Federal Reserve Banks with government oversight. Right on the money.
From the Publisher
"[Lloyd James is] always easy to listen to, bringing history alive as stories while avoiding melodrama and making sure the facts come across." —AudioFile

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393330502
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
10/15/2007
Series:
Enterprise Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
177,735
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.70(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"[Lloyd James is] always easy to listen to, bringing history alive as stories while avoiding melodrama and making sure the facts come across." —-AudioFile

Meet the Author

Best-selling author H. W. Brands is the Dickson Allen Anderson Centennial Professor of History at the University of Texas. He lives in Austin.

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The Money Men: Capitalism, Democracy, and the Hundred Years' War over the American Dollar 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
SassyLassie2 More than 1 year ago
Good book but it is scattering to the effect that it jumps around a good bit from idea to idea. Some of the writers thoughts seem to rapidly come to mind, written down, then a different thought comes and written down. Over all on a one to ten, ten being excellent, I give it a four.