Money Sense for Kids

Money Sense for Kids

5.0 2
by Hollis Page Harman
     
 

Updated with new illustrations showing new-issue currency, new information, and several new features, this popular title for older boys and girls tells the story of money.
  • How and where is it printed?
  • What do all those long numbers and special letters on currency mean?
  • How are the newly designed bills improvements over the old ones?
  • How can banks

Overview


Updated with new illustrations showing new-issue currency, new information, and several new features, this popular title for older boys and girls tells the story of money.

  • How and where is it printed?
  • What do all those long numbers and special letters on currency mean?
  • How are the newly designed bills improvements over the old ones?
  • How can banks afford to pay interest?
Here too are questions and answers that have special meaning for kids. For example, how can boys and girls find savings programs designed especially for them? How can they establish their own bank account, write checks, and use an ATM card? How can kids learn about stocks—and even start to invest their own money? The author offers ideas on how kids can earn, save, budget, and invest money of their own. She also presents puzzles and games that focus on the theme of money. The book’s fascinating text is supplemented with two-color diagrams and illustrations on nearly every page. (Ages 8 and older)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Gr 4-7-In this updated edition of her 1999 title, Harman once again presents a comprehensive guide. Part one introduces different types of U.S. currency including the symbols, material, and history of paper and coins. The author explains the complicated path that money takes from the mint to banks to the consumer. Part two focuses on how to obtain a social security number and the purpose in having one and suggests how to earn money. Part three introduces the concept of how to make it grow and suggests ways to invest in stocks and bonds. Clear, easy-to-follow exercises are provided for each chapter, e.g., dividing an allowance into three jars- "Now," "Short Term," and "Long Term." "Money Games" adds an element of fun and provides activities to be shared with an adult. A solid addition for recreational reading and for reports."

—Kathleen A. Nester, School Library Journal, November 2004

VOYA
Factual information about the monetary system is presented in a conversational narrative that clearly undercuts the significance of the material. The historical background about U.S. currency is accurately detailed with pictures of each of the bills and explanations of all of the symbols. Bank accounts, earnings and risk, social security numbers, and money math are highlighted in simple text that is appropriate for upper elementary readers and middle school students. Stocks and bonds and mutual funds are clearly defined, with an emphasis on saving money and growing diverse investments. Complex ideas are simplified into precise yet childish dialogue. Money games, additional resources, and a subject index are included as well as a selection of charts and graphs. The author's efforts to personalize the text, however, fall short of providing a solid reference tool. Using terms like "on the dole," "tightwad," or "wad of dough" seems grossly inappropriate. "Calculators are friendly" is not the most serious introduction to the tool, although the author describes games to play with it. Although one might applaud the breadth of information that is assembled here, this title cannot be recommended for young adult collection shelves. VOYA CODES: 2Q 2P M J (Better editing or work by the author might have warranted a 3Q; For the YA with a special interest in the subject; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2004, Barron's, 180p.; Glossary. Index. Illus. Charts. Biblio. Further Reading., Trade pb. Ages 11 to 15.
—Nancy Zachary
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-In this updated edition of her 1999 title (Barron's; o.p.), Harman once again presents a comprehensive guide. Part one introduces different types of U.S. currency including the symbols, material, and history of paper and coins. The author explains the complicated path that money takes from the mint to banks to the consumer. Part two focuses on how to obtain a social security number and the purpose in having one and suggests how to earn money. Part three introduces the concept of how to make it grow and suggests ways to invest in stocks and bonds. Clear, easy-to-follow exercises are provided for each chapter, e.g., dividing an allowance into three jars-"Now," "Short Term," and "Long Term." "Money Games" adds an element of fun and provides activities to be shared with an adult. A solid addition for recreational reading and for reports.-Kathleen A. Nester, Downingtown High Ninth Grade Center, PA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764128943
Publisher:
Barron's Educational Series, Incorporated
Publication date:
07/15/2004
Edition description:
2ND
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
255,560
Product dimensions:
6.60(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.45(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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Money Sense for Kids 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hollis Harman writes in great, easy to understand words. All of ages of people should read her book. Designed for all age groups it is the hottest money book out there.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the first complete, understandable, fun, interactive work on money. It can be productive and valuable to children particularly, but also anyone who wants to understand how to manage their money and invest it. The book carries the reader from the basic understanding of our coins and currency, with a unique and facinating perspective, to how to bank, invest and create a financial future.