Money, Sex, War, Karma: Notes for a Buddhist Revolution [NOOK Book]

Overview

  • What's Wrong with Sex?
  • How to Drive Your Karma
  • Consciousness Commodified
  • The Karma of Food
  • The Three Poisons, Institutionalized
  • Why We Love War

These are just some ...
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Money, Sex, War, Karma: Notes for a Buddhist Revolution

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Overview

  • What's Wrong with Sex?
  • How to Drive Your Karma
  • Consciousness Commodified
  • The Karma of Food
  • The Three Poisons, Institutionalized
  • Why We Love War

These are just some of the chapters in this brilliant book from David R. Loy.

In little time, Loy has become one of the most powerful advocates of the Buddhist worldview, explaining like no one else its ability to transform the sociopolitical landscape of the modern world.

In this, his most accessible work to date, he offers sharp and even shockingly clear presentations of oft-misunderstood Buddhist staples-the working of karma, the nature of self, the causes of trouble on both the individual and societal levels-and the real reasons behind our collective sense of "never enough," whether it's time, money, sex, security... even war.

Loy's "Buddhist Revolution" is nothing less than a radical change in the ways we can approach our lives, our planet, the collective delusions that pervade our language, culture, and even our spirituality.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

Loy (ethics, religion, & society, Xavier Univ.; The Great Awakening) would have us believe that Buddhism is better than sex. Or money. Or fame. Well, perhaps it's not exactly better, but, as Loy points out in this provocative look at contemporary America, Buddhism does offer us a way of better understanding why the things we pursue so fervently ultimately leave us unfulfilled. The book's title and its frivolous chapter headings (e.g., "How To Drive Your Karma") belie the seriousness of the text, which is never less than clear in dealing with obscure concepts and in urging an engaged Buddhist response to the difficulties of modern life. There is some repetition of ideas since many of the essays here first appeared as independent pieces in various publications, but for the most part, this repetition helps to reinforce what's being said. Offering non-Buddhists a stimulating framework for dealing with the perception of an emptiness in our secularized times and Buddhists a kick in the pants that disallows the concept of Buddhist practice as irresponsible, irrelevant, and inconsistent with the heart of the teachings, this thoroughly modern take on our contemporary situation deserves a wide reading. Recommended for all collections.
—Mark Woodhouse

From the Publisher

“A work of deep and urgent relevance.”—Ethan Nichtern, author of One City: A Declaration of Interdependence

“I know of no other book that holds more promise for the survival and relevance of Buddhism in the modern world.”—Lin Jensen, author of Pavement

”This book is revolutionary! The clear and concise explanations of Buddhist perspectives on rarely approached topics such as sex, war, and money are an inspiration. If you are interested in personal or societal change, this is a book you need to read.”—Noah Levine, author of Dharma Punx

“Loy is a subversive, undermining our cherished opinions and revealing a revolutionary world of human possibility. He describes an emerging Buddhism that speaks to the Western heart and mind and offers hope in a world that has too little. Long live this revolution!”—James Ishmael Ford, author of If You're Lucky, Your Heart Will Break

“David Loy's Money, Sex, War, Karma: Notes for a Buddhist Revolution might have a flashy title, but it is a serious and substantial book that poses real challenges to the reader. Loy argues with conviction that in order to have relevance in the West, the dharma must find the middle way between its many traditional Asian forms and the contemporary Western feel-good consumerism that characterize much of today's spiritualism.”—Buddhadharma

“For Loy, Buddhism is not just some gentle spiritual path; it’s a tool for social criticism and change. But the revolutionary sword cuts both ways, and just as the West needs Buddhism, says Loy, a living, vital Buddhism also needs the West.”—Shambhala Sun

“Loy's thought provoking book has wide appeal: for people not so familiar with Buddhist thought and practice his emphasis is on why this 2500 year old religion is relevant today. For seasoned Buddhist practitioners, the book keeps us from thinking too small. Loy's analysis is a challenge to practice in the world wholeheartedly.”—Mountain Record

“David Loy’s is an urgent and vital voice in the Buddhist world, and his latest work is a passionate and bold survey of some of the big issues that face us individually and collectively. This thoughtful, probing work warrants the attention of anyone interested in creative change on either an individual or social level. I strongly recommend it.”—Western Buddhist Review

“Direct, articulate, and profound. David R. Loy succinctly analyzes primary areas of our collective modern entanglements with suffering: consumerism, money values, ecological collapse, sexuality, relationships, time, language, identity, godlessness and the commodification of consciousness. In each case he brings to bear the core teachings of the Buddha in profound, up-to-date reflections on our collective situation.”—Inquiring Mind

Ethan Nichtern
"A work of deep and urgent relevance."
Lin Jensen
"I know of no other book that holds more promise for the survival and relevance of Buddhism in the modern world."
Noah Levine
"This book is revolutionary! The clear and concise explanations of Buddhist perspectives on rarely approached topics such as sex, war, and money are an inspiration. If you are interested in personal or societal change, this is a book you need to read."
James Ishmael Ford
"Loy is a subversive, undermining our cherished opinions and revealing a revolutionary world of human possibility. He describes an emerging Buddhism that speaks to the Western heart and mind and offers hope in a world that has too little. Long live this revolution!"
Buddhadharma
"David Loy's Money, Sex, War, Karma: Notes for a Buddhist Revolution might have a flashy title, but it is a serious and substantial book that poses real challenges to the reader. Loy argues with conviction that in order to have relevance in the West, the dharma must find the middle way between its many traditional Asian forms and the contemporary Western feel-good consumerism that characterize much of today's spiritualism."
Shambhala Sun
"For Loy, Buddhism is not just some gentle spiritual path; it's a tool for social criticism and change. But the revolutionary sword cuts both ways, and just as the West needs Buddhism, says Loy, a living, vital Buddhism also needs the West."
Mountain Record
"Loy's thought provoking book has wide appeal: for people not so familiar with Buddhist thought and practice his emphasis is on why this 2500 year old religion is relevant today. For seasoned Buddhist practitioners, the book keeps us from thinking too small. Loy's analysis is a challenge to practice in the world wholeheartedly."
Western Buddhist Review
"David Loy's is an urgent and vital voice in the Buddhist world, and his latest work is a passionate and bold survey of some of the big issues that face us individually and collectively. This thoughtful, probing work warrants the attention of anyone interested in creative change on either an individual or social level. I strongly recommend it."
Inquiring Mind
"Direct, articulate, and profound. David R. Loy succinctly analyzes primary areas of our collective modern entanglements with suffering: consumerism, money values, ecological collapse, sexuality, relationships, time, language, identity, godlessness and the commodification of consciousness. In each case he brings to bear the core teachings of the Buddha in profound, up-to-date reflections on our collective situation."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780861719655
  • Publisher: Wisdom Publications MA
  • Publication date: 3/10/2008
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 176
  • File size: 518 KB

Meet the Author

David R. Loy's previous books include the acclaimed Money, Sex, War, Karma, The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory, and The Dharma of Dragons and Daemons, a finalist for the 2006 Mythopoeic Scholarship Award. He was the Besl Professor of Ethics/Religion and Society at Cincinnati's Xavier University.
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Table of Contents

Introduction     1
The Suffering of Self     15
Lack of Money     25
The Great Seduction     31
Trapped in Time     37
The Second Buddha     45
How to Drive Your Karma     53
What's Wrong with Sex?     65
What Would the Buddha Do?     79
The Three Poisons, Institutionalized     87
Consciousness Commodified: The Attention-Deficit Society     95
Healing Ecology     103
The Karma of Food     113
Why We Love War     127
Notes for a Buddhist Revolution     139
Index     153
Acknowledgments     161
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 29, 2011

    I am new to David Loy but have been exploring the ideas and practices he writesabout hear for years.

    It's been awhile since a book without violence and high mystery kept me up all night turning pages. I highly recommend this book to seekers and those concered with the downward descent of our society and how Buddha dharma might help. Phillip Ziegler, author of A Skeptic's guide to the 12 Steps.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Buddhism for those who live and work in the mosh pit of life

    David Loy is insightful and seems to live in the same world I do--in conventional reality where ideals and the art of the possible meet. Sound dharma understandings offered in view of western convention. Loy is a gifted writer with a good natured sense of humor.

    While not a beginners book, this is likely to be as helpful (and more interesting) to someone who wants to understand Buddhism in the context of their western life as any basic book on buddhism.

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  • Posted September 12, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Good Introduction to David R. Loy

    If you've never read anything by David R. Loy, this is a good place to begin. However, if you are familiar with his work, don't bother getting this slim volume because you'll likely be disappointed.

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    Posted January 5, 2010

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    Posted November 12, 2008

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    Posted December 7, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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