Money Talks: Speech, Economic Power, and the Values of Democracy [NOOK Book]

Overview

Many have argued that soft money and special interests are destroying the American electoral system. And yet the clarion call for campaign finance reform only touches on the more general belief that money and economic power have a disastrous impact on both free expression and American democracy. The nation's primary sources of communication, the argument goes, are increasingly controlled by vast corporate empires whose primary, or even exclusive motive is the maximization of profit. And these conglomerates should...

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Money Talks: Speech, Economic Power, and the Values of Democracy

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Overview

Many have argued that soft money and special interests are destroying the American electoral system. And yet the clarion call for campaign finance reform only touches on the more general belief that money and economic power have a disastrous impact on both free expression and American democracy. The nation's primary sources of communication, the argument goes, are increasingly controlled by vast corporate empires whose primary, or even exclusive motive is the maximization of profit. And these conglomerates should simply not be granted the same constitutional protection as, say, an individual protester.

And yet neither the expenditure of money for expressive purposes nor an underlying motive of profit maximization detracts from the values fostered by such activity, claims Martin H. Redish. In fact, given the modern economic realities that dictate that effective expression virtually requires the expenditure of capital, any restriction of such capital for expressive purposes will necessarily reduce the sum total of available expression. Further, Redish here illustrates, the underlying motive of those who wish to restrict corporate expression is disagreement with the nature of the views they express.

Confronting head-on one of the sacred cows of American reformist politics, Martin H. Redish here once again lives up to his reputation as one of America's most original and counterintuitive legal minds.

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Editorial Reviews

Law and Politics Book Review
A provocative book in the truest sense of the term, in that it challenges widely-shared assumptions and prompts scholars to either reassess their conclusions or respond with even more effective counterarguments.
Booknews
Drawing together a number of articles he has written or co-written since 1990 and some original chapters, Redish (law and public policy, Northwestern U.) defends unlimited political contribution, advertising, and other forms by which the rich and powerful stay rich and powerful. Any restriction, he says, threatens First Amendment rights. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780814769188
  • Publisher: New York University Press
  • Publication date: 8/1/2001
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 334
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author


The author of numerous books and for a quarter century one of the country's most provocative commentators on free speech issues, Martin H. Redish is the Louis and Harriet Professor of Law and Public Policy at Northwestern University School of Law.

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Table of Contents

Preface
1 Introduction: The Intersection between Free Speech and Economic Power 1
2 Commercial Speech and Democratic Values 14
3 Corporate Speech and the Theory of Free Expression 63
4 Free Speech and the Flawed Postulates of Campaign Finance Regulation 115
5 The Right of Expressive Access, Redistributive Values, and the Democratic Dilemma 147
6 Government Subsidies and Free Expression 196
7 Conclusion: Free Expression and the Sound of Money 232
Notes 237
Index 315
About the Author 319
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