The Money We'll Save by Brock Cole, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The Money We'll Save

The Money We'll Save

by Brock Cole
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

One of Horn Book's Best Picture Books of 2011
When Pa brings a turkey poult home to fatten for Christmas dinner, he assures Ma that it will be no trouble since it can live in a box by the stove and eat table scraps--and just think of the money we'll save! But it's not quite so simple to raise a turkey in a tiny flat in a nineteenth-century New York City

Overview

One of Horn Book's Best Picture Books of 2011
When Pa brings a turkey poult home to fatten for Christmas dinner, he assures Ma that it will be no trouble since it can live in a box by the stove and eat table scraps--and just think of the money we'll save! But it's not quite so simple to raise a turkey in a tiny flat in a nineteenth-century New York City tenement. Can Pa and the children manage the willful and growing Alfred and keep the neighbors happy until Christmas? Pa finds a solution for every difficulty--until he encounters one that threatens to ruin Christmas completely. How the family joins together to solve this last difficulty makes for a very funny and satisfying holiday story.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this charmingly loopy tale set in a cramped 19th-century tenement, Ma sends Pa to the market to buy eggs and flour (“Christmas is not far off, and we must save every penny”). He returns, however, with a scrawny turkey, vowing to fatten it up for Christmas, proclaiming, “Think of the money we’ll save!” The bird eats everything in sight, wreaks havoc in their apartment, and annoys the neighbors, but when it’s time to bring him to the butcher, the children protest. Creating a strong sense of the historical setting, Cole’s (Good Enough to Eat) wispy pictures play off the ample comedy in the prose, making for a holiday story as humorous as it is touching. Ages 4–up. (Oct.)
From the Publisher

“When Pa brings home a young turkey to fatten up for Christmas dinner, chaos follows in Cole's picture book tale about a penny-pinching family squeezed into a 19th century New York City tenement.” —Sacramento Bee

“...all ends well in this humorous, wholesome story about tightened straits, with its not-too-vinegary perspective on how the other half celebrates.” —NYTimes.com

“This could easily be incorporated into a class history lesson or simply enjoyed as a unique and humorous holiday story.” —BCCB

“Nothing is sumptuous for the 19th-century tenement-dwelling family at the heart of Brock Cole's endearing picture book 'The Money We'll Save' (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 40 pages, $16.99)...With Mr. Cole's watercolor-filled wobbly line drawings, we see the family--and soon their neighbors--struggling to accommodate the growing bird. Not a penny is saved, of course, but in the end the bird offers enrichment of a charmingly different sort.” —Wall Street Journal

“Cole's buoyant watercolors capture the busy chaos and warm homeyness of family life plus turkey in this folksy journey into a different time.” —Booklist

“Cole's blithe illustrations, comfortably crowded with his amusing, expressive characters, set this entertaining holiday story in nineteenth-century New York City.” —Horn Book Magazine, starred review

“…a holiday story as humorous as it is touching.” —Publishers Weekly

“Cole's humorous illustrations bring to life the crowded conditions in a 19th-century New York tenement building; the characters are raggedy and poor, but full of spirit and good will.” —School Library Journal

“When Pa brings home a turkey poult to raise for Christmas dinner, hilarious complications ensue in this heartwarming family story set in 19th-century New York City.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

Children's Literature - Carrie Hane Hung
Ma sends Pa to the market because the children are busy with their chores. All Pa had to do was buy two eggs and a half pound of flour so that Ma could make supper. She cautions him that they must save their money because Christmas will be arriving soon. Pa was doing well with his shopping until the chicken man convinces Pa to buy a young turkey to fatten up for Christmas. Just think of the money saved by feeding table scraps to the turkey so that they can have it for Christmas dinner. On the other hand, imagine raising a turkey in a small apartment with a family of six during the nineteenth century. Pa brings home the turkey which the children name Alfred. Soon Alfred quickly outgrows his box by the stove. The family makes many more accommodations to keep the turkey. When Christmas Eve arrives, they face a big problem that they must resolve. The watercolor illustrations support the events and hilarious antics that occur in the story. The sepia-colored illustrations on the end pages set the tone of the story's time frame. Readers will enjoy this heartwarming holiday story. Reviewer: Carrie Hane Hung
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—When Ma sends Pa out shopping, she cautions him to get only flour and eggs, as the family of six needs to save every penny in order to have a decent Christmas. Instead Pa comes home with a hungry young turkey that he aims to fatten up in time for the holiday. Alfred, as they name him, makes messes in and around their tiny tenement flat, angering everyone in the building. He does get fat in time for Christmas, but by then the family members can't bring themselves to eat him. Their solution is heartwarming if not entirely satisfying; some readers might feel that eating cantankerous Alfred would have been preferable to the meager holiday that the family celebrates. Cole's humorous illustrations bring to life the crowded conditions in a 19th-century New York tenement building; the characters are raggedy and poor, but full of spirit and good will.—Eva Mitnick, Los Angeles Public Library
Kirkus Reviews

When Pa brings home a turkey poult to raise for Christmas dinner, hilarious complications ensue in this heartwarming family story set in 19th-century New York City.

The family of six lives in a crowded three-room flat, and they quickly discover that there isn't room for a growing turkey in their small kitchen. Pa first builds a pen for Alfred the turkey on the fire escape and then a larger pen hung from pulleys on the clothesline. After complaints from the neighbors, Pa moves the turkey into the flat's single bedroom, and the family has to sleep in the kitchen and parlor. When Christmas arrives, the children can't bear to eat Alfred for dinner, so they give him (as a pet) to their downstairs neighbor for her Christmas gift. The cleverly constructed text is full of understated humor and witty dialogue, with a satisfying conclusion describing the family's simple but happy Christmas celebration. Cole's loose watercolor-and-ink illustrations skillfully evoke the old-fashioned setting and busy life of a New York tenement community. He effectively shows the connected clotheslines, backyard privies and outdoor neighborhood markets of another era, and each character has a distinctive personality.

Young fans of historical fiction series will enjoy this, as will anyone who enjoys a funny family story about Christmas preparations.(Picture book. 4-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374350116
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
10/11/2011
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
727,379
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 10.40(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD780L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Brock Cole is the author/illustrator of many picture books and young adult novels. He lives in Buffalo, New York.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >