Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game

4.2 445
by Michael Lewis
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0393324818

ISBN-13: 9780393324815

Pub. Date: 04/05/2004

Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.

"This delightfully written, lesson-laden book deserves a place of its own in the Baseball Hall of Fame." —ForbesMoneyball is a quest for the secret of success in baseball. In a narrative full of fabulous characters and brilliant excursions into the unexpected, Michael Lewis follows the low-budget Oakland A's, visionary general manager Billy Beane, and the strange

Overview

"This delightfully written, lesson-laden book deserves a place of its own in the Baseball Hall of Fame." —ForbesMoneyball is a quest for the secret of success in baseball. In a narrative full of fabulous characters and brilliant excursions into the unexpected, Michael Lewis follows the low-budget Oakland A's, visionary general manager Billy Beane, and the strange brotherhood of amateur baseball theorists. They are all in search of new baseball knowledge—insights that will give the little guy who is willing to discard old wisdom the edge over big money.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393324815
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
04/05/2004
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
42,820
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.90(d)

Table of Contents

PrefaceXI
Chapter 1The Curse of Talent3
Chapter 2How to Find a Ballplayer14
Chapter 3The Enlightenment43
Chapter 4Field of Ignorance64
Chapter 5The Jeremy Brown Blue Plate Special97
Chapter 6The Science of Winning an Unfair Game119
Chapter 7Giambi's Hole138
Chapter 8Scott Hatteberg, Pickin' Machine162
Chapter 9The Trading Desk188
Chapter 10Anatomy of an Undervalued Pitcher217
Chapter 11The Human Element244
Chapter 12The Speed of the Idea263
Epilogue: The Badger281
Postscript: Inside Baseball's Religious War287
Acknowledgments303
Index305

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Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 446 reviews.
tsmom1219 More than 1 year ago
Moneyball is way more entertaining than it has any right to be. It follows the story of the low-budget Oakland A's and their unorthodox general manager Billy Beane as they use statistics and the scientific method to succeed against teams with much larger payrolls. Lewis is a very entertaining writer, at times laugh out loud funny, who has turned what could have been a very dry subject into a real page turner. I read this in one day, which is unusual for me with non-fiction. Highly recommended, especially in the dead of winter when the beginning of baseball season seems so far away.
gvanmeter More than 1 year ago
I'm neither a fan of baseball or statistics, but Michael Lewis has the ability to explain both of them in such a compelling way, I couldn't put it down. I read it after watching the movie, and found a much more nuanced chronicle in the book. Well worth the read, especially if you enjoyed the movie.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book Moneyball is about a professional baseball player, Billy Beane, who was a good player in high school and college. Out of college, he was drafted by Oakland Athletics. Beane decided he wanted to become the General Manager of the A¿s after he had played for them for a few years. As a player, he learned that he did not want to be an actual baseball player; he wanted to be the person who picked the players that would make the team. When he became the General Manager for the Oakland Athletics, he developed a strategy to form a baseball team out of players that other teams did not necessarily want. Beane used players¿ high school and college statistics to choose the good players that he wanted and ones that would sign for less money.
Though there were many parts that I liked and disliked, one of the big things that I liked about this book was that it taught me a new way to look at how baseball players are chosen for a team. It showed me what coaches look for in a strong player and that it¿s not necessarily all talent; it is how many runs they produce, bases they steal. Even though this book is really good, the language is not appropriate for young readers, it contains inappropriate words. The hardest part about this book was understanding all the numbers and formulas he used. Since there were so many numbers, it distracted me from what the book was actually about, how he built the Oakland A¿s. That was the only dislike I really had reading this book. Other than the numbers, the book was really interesting.
I believe the main message in this book is that you don¿t have to be the richest team to get the better players for your team. Even though the Oakland A¿s pay roll was really low compared to the Yankees huge pay roll, the A¿s knew the best way to make a good team without spending a lot of money on players. Beane used player statistics to find who the best players were and ones that would sign for less money.
I would suggest this book to a specific group, people who like baseball and math. This book is all about numbers, probability, playing and managing baseball. It was a great book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing
Rick489 More than 1 year ago
This was the best book relating to sports that I've ever read. It gives great insight into how one team (the Oakland A's) used unique decision making to compete against teams with grossly larger payrolls. I especially liked the behind the scenes look it gave to some of the tough evaluations that need to be made by a professional sports team's front office, and the untraditional formulas employed by Billy Beane and his staff to reach them. While I cant imagine any baseball fan not enjoying this book, I would suggest that it a good read for the nonsports fan as well, as many of the ideas discussed in relation to running a basball team can be correlated to just about any form of businees.
Charles F Canfield Jr More than 1 year ago
I am not a baseball fan at all, personally, I think the sport is downright boring. However, I throughlly enjoyed this book. It has rekindled my interest in baseball. I know find myself watching games anf paying attengion to stats.
Tony72 More than 1 year ago
I purchased my nook never having been much of a book reader at 38, but in the hopes of becoming one. This was the 1st book I downloaded and finished it in less than a week. It kept my attention that much and i have been known to have the attention span of a gnat. It's not just a book about baseball, but about business economics, evaluating talent and an individuals character as well. Inviting people to think outside the conventional wisdom. I would recommend it to anybody. Baseball fan or not.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good story, well written and an entertaining intro to baseball stats.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book teaches you the importance of baseball. Its very emotional and sensative.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the best books iv ever read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lol
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Whoever wrote boring most likely did not read it
Grayle Kendall More than 1 year ago
I really like this book. Great for baseball fanatics.
TwinsfanLR More than 1 year ago
A look at one of the poorest teams in baseball, the Oakland A's, and how their general manager Billy Beane makes them contenders every year. It shows you how they scout, draft, and play the game, only to name a few things. He does things his way, and nobody is going to change that, and he does them well. One of the most criticized books in the baseball world since Ball Four, and a real winner. Lewis is an extraordinary writer who should do sports as much as he does Walstreet. A MUST read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved the film so thought I'd try the book. Great for fans of baseball everywhere!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If your a baseball fan with an outsiders perspective of the game, its a must read. My only concern is that we only received insight to part of who Billy Beane really is.
JoeVerde More than 1 year ago
Baseball, I love. Statistics... I could leave. Lewis somehow makes both halves of this book interesting. Don't get me wrong, it's not really a book about crunching numbers... it's a story about the science behind a sport, the brains who take that science to the next level, and the brawns who sometimes dogmatically resist them. A very interesting read.
Golfer18 More than 1 year ago
Tossing Tradition to the Side Moneyball is a fantastic tale of making it big off of a small opportunity. Billy Beane, the manager of the Oakland A's, decides to toss the typical way of recruiting to the side and base it off a few simple statistics (On base percentage and slugging percentage).  Michael Lewis does a great job at turning a relatively boring topic into a great read. Lewis did a great job showing the ego that Billy Beane carries by attempting to change baseball forever. This book inspires you to face problems head on no matter the difficulty. Everyone searching for a fantastic story of defeating the odds should read Moneyball. The book earns a perfect 5 out of 5.
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Moneyball takes place at Fenway Park in Boston right?