The Monk: A Romance / Edition 1

The Monk: A Romance / Edition 1

3.8 17
by Matthew Gregory Lewis, Kathleen Scherf, D. L. MacDonald
     
 

ISBN-10: 1551112272

ISBN-13: 9781551112275

Pub. Date: 11/26/2003

Publisher: Broadview Press

The Monk is the most sensational of Gothic novels. The main plot concerns Ambrosio, an abbot of irreproachable holiness, who is seduced by a woman (or perhaps a demon) disguised as a novice, and who goes on to sell his soul to the Devil. An extravagant blend of sex, death, politics, Satanism, and poetry, the work greatly appealed to the Marquis de Sade.

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Overview

The Monk is the most sensational of Gothic novels. The main plot concerns Ambrosio, an abbot of irreproachable holiness, who is seduced by a woman (or perhaps a demon) disguised as a novice, and who goes on to sell his soul to the Devil. An extravagant blend of sex, death, politics, Satanism, and poetry, the work greatly appealed to the Marquis de Sade.

The Broadview edition includes a critical introduction and appendices of historical materials that address the novel’s literary sources (in English, German, and Greek literature), historical contexts (the French Revolution, slavery and abolition debates, sexuality), critical reception, and influence.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781551112275
Publisher:
Broadview Press
Publication date:
11/26/2003
Series:
Broadview Literary Texts Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
481
Sales rank:
365,162
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.37(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Matthew Gregory Lewis: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text

The Monk

  • Vol.1
    Vol.2
    Vol.3

Appendix A: Literary Sources

  1. Richard Steele, The Guardian, 31 August 1713
  2. Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, 1747-48
    1. Lovelace’s Dream
    2. Clarissa’s Dream
  3. Johann Karl August Musäus, “The Elopement”
  4. Christian Friedrich Daniel Schubart, “The Eternal Tew”
  5. Matthew Gregory Lewis, “Imitation of Anacreon”

Appendix B: Historical Contexts

  1. The French Revolution
    1. Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790
    2. Matthew Gregory Lewis, “France and England in 1793”
    3. Thomas Paine, The Age of Reason, 1794-95
  2. Colonialism and Slavery
    1. Matthew Gregory Lewis, The Castle Spectre, 1797
    2. Matthew Gregory Lewis, Journal of a West India Proprietor, 1815-18
  3. Georgian Homophobia
    1. The Trying and Pilloring of the Vere Street Club, 1810

Appendix C: Critical Reception

  1. [Mary Wollstonecraft?], Analytical Review, October 1796
  2. European Magazine, February 1797
  3. [Samuel Taylor Coleridge], Critical Review, February 1797
  4. “An Apology for the Monk,” Monthly Mirror, April 1797
  5. Matthew Gregory Lewis, letter to his father, 23 February 1798
  6. Matthew Gregory Lewis, Preface to Adelmorn, the Outlaw, 1801
  7. Le Décade philosophique, 9 May 1797
  8. Spectateur du nord, April-June 1798
  9. Marquis de Sade, “Reflections on the Novel,” 1800
  10. Ann Radcliffe, “On the Supernatural in Poetry,” 1826

Appendix D: Cultural Responses

  1. Charles Farley, Raymond and Agnes, 1797
  2. “The Bleeding Nun,” 1801
  3. Almagro & Claude; or Monastic Murder, 1810

Appendix E: Variants

Works Cited and Recommended Reading

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The Monk 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After I got used to the old-style grammar (shot-gun commas, non-standard spelling, and Drive-By Capitalization), I really enjoyed this book. It's campy and overly melodramatic, but that just adds to its charm. If you've got a few hours to kill and don't mind a few subplots that have nodding acquaintances with each other, I recommend this. It tickles me that the author was only 19 when he wrote this and people are still reading it a couple of centuries later.
WTVCrimeDawg More than 1 year ago
I read The Monk as part of the required reading for my Gothic Fictions class in college. The books in my recommended reading list are all related to the gothic theme of the class. The Broadview edition is excellent for literary study. In the introduction, the editors explain many of the influences on Lewis when he wrote The Monk, which include the French Revolution, Goethe's Faustus, Burke's Sublime and Beautiful, and--just in case you didn't get enough from other novels--there's even some Oedipus influence, as well. The criticisms and letters in the back help one to understand the outrage and censorship of the book in late 18th century Europe. It was not well received by many in power. As far as the story itself, the overall tone of the book definitely has an anti-Catholic theme. Lewis was raised a Protestant, so he supported the French Revolution, but he was also concerned with its excesses. The revolution and excesses of both Ambrosio and Agnes parallel his sentiment about the French Revolution. The weaving of the main plot and subplot made the reading at times a bit dense, although there were several good parts. Lewis did a very nice job of incorporating Burke's sublime and beautiful techniques, such as using obscurity when describing the sublime, and there were parts about the ghost of the bleeding nun that sent chills up my spine as I read it. Overall, I liked the book, but I'm not easily offended by this sort of stuff. However, if a monk breaking his vows and committing all sorts of crimes, including rape and murder, might offend you, this probably isn't the book for you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really wanted to read this, very much so. However. It is hard to read lines sech as follows: ghhf #2 jbr pkn. The scan was so bad there weren't two paragraphs back to back that were readable. I know it was free, but so id smog, Sad sbout this because I Really wanted to read this so badly. My loss.
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Byrnie More than 1 year ago
I really loved this book. I was upset that it had to end. Maybe I will read it again someday. You should get it and read it.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sweet you are so lucky. I want to go see it. It comes out on the 23rd my birthday!!!!!!!!!