Monkeys

Monkeys

4.8 6
by Susan Minot
     
 

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NATIONAL BESTSELLER

In this luminous story of family life—the first novel by Susan Minot, author of the highly acclaimed Evening—the seven Vincent children follow their Catholic mother to Mass and spend Thanksgiving with their father's aging parents who come from a world of New England priviledge. As they grow older, they meet with the perplexing

Overview

NATIONAL BESTSELLER

In this luminous story of family life—the first novel by Susan Minot, author of the highly acclaimed Evening—the seven Vincent children follow their Catholic mother to Mass and spend Thanksgiving with their father's aging parents who come from a world of New England priviledge. As they grow older, they meet with the perplexing lives of adults. Susan Minot writes with delicacy and a tremendous gift for the details that decorate domestic life, and when tragedy strikes she beautifully mines the children's tenderness for each other, and their aching guardianship of what they have.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Minot's prose possesses a thrilling eloquence, a heartbreaking clarity."—Newsday

"Not since J. D. Salinger has an American writer so feelingly evoked the special affections and loyalties that may develop among children in a large family."—The New York Times Book Review

"Striking and original.... Minot chronicles the mundane and miraculous moments that characterize family life, in prose that is exactingly realistic, yet delicately lyrical.... Few novels have so powerfully displayed the collective unity—and joy—of family life."—Chicago Tribune

"Susan Minot's funny, wry and profoundly moving novel of a large and gawky family in Massachusetts is full of quiet surprises.... Minot is masterful at showing us the chaos of a young family forming and reforming itself. But it is the absolute simplicity of her observation—always selective, often eccentric—that astounds us for its clarity time after time."—San Francisco Chronicle

Library Journal
Minot's 1989 Lust offers a dozen stories involving relationships among young New Yorkers. Monkeys, a 1986 novel, portrays the children of a large New England family who try to cope when their mother--their anchor--dies. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375708367
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/28/2000
Series:
Contemporaries Series
Edition description:
1 VINTAGE
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
636,967
Product dimensions:
5.13(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.45(d)

What People are saying about this

Jayne Anne Phillips
Susan Minot's quietly luminous children are voyagers in a past marked by seaside privilege, ritual Catholicism, and the mysterious lonliness of adults. Her oblique prose establishes a country of childhood in which grief exists like a premonition and children are the saviors of children.
Thomas McGuane
Monkeys is a book of unusual purity and truthfulness. It hardens the line of a world once barely familiar and makes it ours. Susan Minot touches us by her accurate humanity.
Alice Adams
I loved reading Monkeys. Susan Minot writes with such delicacy -- sketches in confident, sure brushstrokes, a lovely book.

Meet the Author

Susan Minot lives in New York City.

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Monkeys 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
alias_dw More than 1 year ago
Monkeys is not for everyone. I can see how it might leave readers vexed and frankly annoyed. The reason behind this of course is Minot's personal writing style. She makes a conscious choice to force the reader to read between the lines in order to understand the story. It was because of Minot's writing style that I loved this novel. Monkeys is not just a piece of literature, this book is a piece of art. It is new and different, you have to take time with it but in the end it is time well spent. Minot's novel has an odd disjointed narrative voice. Monkeys is made up of nine stories, not one of which is told in the same voice. I don't dislike that, in fact I find it fascinating and inspired. Because the book is told chronologically by some of the children of the Vincent family it makes sense that the voices would change as the children mature. They see things that always existed in a different light and the way the story is told reflects that.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Monkeys are my sister!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kiss your hand 3 times post this onto 3 other books then look under your pillow
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is sooo werid
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Y don't make urself older?