Mono: A Developer's Notebook

Overview

The Mono Project is the much talked-about open source initiative to create a Unix implementation of Microsoft's .NET Development Framework. Its purpose is to allow Unix developers to build and deploy cross-platform .NET applications. The project has also sparked interest in developing components, libraries and frameworks with C#, the programming language of .NET.

The controversy? Some say Mono will become the preferred platform for Linux development, empowering Linux/Unix ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (25) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $13.88   
  • Used (17) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

The Mono Project is the much talked-about open source initiative to create a Unix implementation of Microsoft's .NET Development Framework. Its purpose is to allow Unix developers to build and deploy cross-platform .NET applications. The project has also sparked interest in developing components, libraries and frameworks with C#, the programming language of .NET.

The controversy? Some say Mono will become the preferred platform for Linux development, empowering Linux/Unix developers. Others say it will allow Microsoft to embrace, extend, and extinguish Linux. The controversy rages on, but—like many developers—maybe you've had enough talk and want to see what Mono is really all about.

There's one way to find out: roll up your sleeves, get to work, and see what you Mono can do. How do you start? You can research Mono at length. You can play around with it, hoping to figure things out for yourself. Or, you can get straight to work with Mono: A Developer's Notebook—a hands-on guide and your trusty lab partner as you explore Mono 1.0.

Light on theory and long on practical application, Mono: A Developer's Notebook bypasses the talk and theory, and jumps right into Mono 1.0. Diving quickly into a rapid tour of Mono, you'll work through nearly fifty mini-projects that will introduce you to the most important and compelling aspects of the 1.0 release. Using the task-oriented format of this new series, you'll learn how to acquire, install, and run Mono on Linux, Windows, or Mac OS X. You'll work with the various Mono components: Gtk#, the Common Language Runtime, the class libraries (both .NET and Mono-provided class libraries), IKVM and the Mono C# compiler. No other resource will take you so deeply into Mono so quickly or show you as effectively what Mono is capable of.

The new Developer's Notebooks series from O'Reilly covers important new tools for software developers. Emphasizing example over explanation and practice over theory, they focus on learning by doing—you'll get the goods straight from the masters, in an informal and code-intensive style that suits developers. If you've been curious about Mono, but haven't known where to start, this no-fluff, lab-style guide is the solution.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Slashdot.org
If you are a developer with previous experience in object-oriented programming, Mono: A Developer's Notebook will provide you with an excellent introduction into many of the aspects of working with Mono, its associated libraries and programs.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596007928
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/15/2004
  • Series: Developer's Notebook Series
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 7.09 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Meet the Author

Edd Dumbill is Managing Editor of XML.com. He also writes free software, and packages Bluetooth-related software for the Debian GNU/Linux distribution. Edd is the creator of XMLhack and WriteTheWeb, and has a weblog called Behind the Times.

Niel M. Bornstein , with over ten years' experience in software development, has worked in diverse areas such as corporate information systems, client-server application development, and web-hosted applications. Clear and engaging, Niel wrote .NET & XML and co-authored Mono: A Developer's Notebook.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

  • Foreword
  • The Developer’s Notebook Series
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1: Getting Mono Running
  • Chapter 2: Getting Started with C#
  • Chapter 3: Core .NET
  • Chapter 4: Gtk#
  • Chapter 5: Advanced Gtk#
  • Chapter 6: Processing XML
  • Chapter 7: Networking, Remoting, and Web Services
  • Chapter 8: Cutting Edge Mono
  • Colophon

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2004

    Impressive catch up

    You better know C# and .NET before reading this book! In the interests of conciseness, the authors effectively assume that you are already facile in both. They don't want to waste your time rehashing elementary syntactical issues in either. It is hard not to be impressed by how far a group of linux volunteers has come with this project. Operating purely on donated time and minimal budget [as far as I can tell], they have replicated a lot of functionality that Microsoft must have spent millions to develop in the first place. Without offending the Mono developers, do keep in mind that it is always easier to play catch up than it is to innovate. The authors show that it is possible to merge the various linux and unix platforms and develop under .NET. Though .NET supports various languages, for serious developement under Microsoft operating systems, C# is preferred. Likewise here, the volunteer effort focuses on using C#, rather than VB.NET, say. Also, if you are from the linux/unix world, it is likely that you already know some Java. So C# is not really all that big a shift for you. What will be interesting is if developers using this book can come up with some nice popular application that others on a native Microsoft .NET platform have not done. That would really boost support for Mono.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)