The Monster Who Ate My Peas

The Monster Who Ate My Peas

5.0 3
by Danny Schnitzlein, Matt Faulkner
     
 

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A boy thinks he's discovered a way to avoid eating his least favorite food by making a bargain with a fiendishly funny monster. The deal starts off simply: if the monster eats his peas, he gets the boy's soccer ball. But with each new meal, the demands escalate. Eventually, our hero faces a daunting decision—can he conquer his loathing for peas or will he

Overview

A boy thinks he's discovered a way to avoid eating his least favorite food by making a bargain with a fiendishly funny monster. The deal starts off simply: if the monster eats his peas, he gets the boy's soccer ball. But with each new meal, the demands escalate. Eventually, our hero faces a daunting decision—can he conquer his loathing for peas or will he lose what is most important to him?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Although couched in bombastic rhyme and grotesque illustrations, Schnitzlein's debut simply rehashes a truism: kids will do anything to avoid eating their greens. In "Night Before Christmas" verse, the boy narrator describes three encounters with a garbage beast, whose "big bloated body was broccoli-green,/ And his breath, when he sneered, reeked of rotten sardines." When the hulking creature proposes to devour the boy's peas in exchange for a soccer ball, the boy accepts. He haggles with the monster at subsequent mealtimes, but when it tries to take his dog, he desperately gulps a pea and has a Green Eggs and Ham epiphany: "That pea didn't taste like I thought that it would./ I had to admit it. That pea tasted good!" Faulkner's (The Moon Clock) fearsome illustrations recall David Catrow's hyperbolic paintings; the bloated monster, which has purple-gray tentacles and an eggplant nose, emerges from the trash and lurks under tables. Yet suspense is controlled by the clockwork verse, which steadily advances toward the boy's revelation and the banishment of the devilish tempter. For an original approach to yucky vegetables, Yaccarino and McCauley's The Lima Bean Monster (Children's Forecasts, July 30) makes a better choice. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-Another yucky food story, this one told in rhyme. And it actually works. The narrator does not want to eat his peas, but risks losing out on dessert. Along comes a food monster that agrees to eat the veggies if the child gives him his soccer ball. That's fine until the dreaded morsels show up again a few days later. The monster drives a hard, Faustian bargain and, naturally, when the stakes become too high, the boy discovers that he likes peas. The rhymes flow, begging to be read aloud. Faulkner has created a truly disgusting monster with hairy feet and icky toenails, covered with slimy vegetables, too big for the page. Children will clamor to hear this one again and again.-Ann Cook, formerly at Winter Park Public Library, FL Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Arcimboldo meets Mad Magazine as a monster that looks like a cross between an octopus and a compost pile bargains with a young narrator willing to sacrifice his prized soccer ball, and even his new bike, rather than eat peas. The creature wears a battered top hat above its many waving eyestalks and tentacles, and there's a Seussian (or Clement Clarke Moore) flavor to the rhymed text as well: "His ears were like mushrooms, his chin like a beet, / And he balanced himself on two big stinky feet," etc. Coming to regret each treasure's loss, the lad at last screws his courage to the sticking place and samples the dreaded green stuff-only (unsurprisingly) to discover that he likes it. The monster shrivels away forthwith. Though readers may find it hard to swallow the ending (and some lines of text are swallowed by the art over which they're printed), the rollicking rhythms and madcap, over-the-top art give this successor to Sarah Wilson's out-of-print Muskrat, Muskrat Eat Your Peas (1989) plenty of comic energy. On to Faust. (Picture book. 8-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781561452163
Publisher:
Peachtree Publishers, Ltd.
Publication date:
09/28/2001
Pages:
1
Sales rank:
470,711
Product dimensions:
10.69(w) x 9.14(h) x 0.44(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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The Monster Who Ate My Peas 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Its_Time_Mamaw More than 1 year ago
As the boy sits at the dinner table staring at the peas on his plate his mother very seriously tells him he will not get his dessert unless he eat every single peas on his plate. When she leaves the room a monster that looks like a giant blog of mixed veggies offter to eat his peas in exchange for his soccer ball. The monster continues to return offering to eat whatever the boy did not want to eat and he always wanted something that was very special to the boy. Would you give up things that are special to you just so you would not have to eat something you disliked? Could you lie to your parents and tell them you ate all of your food? This story was fun with all the rhymes that I now have stuck in my head. The author have a hilarious imagination to write such a fun rhyming tale. So did the illustrator in creating the perfect characters for the tale, especially the grotesque monster, the darling baby and cute puppy. Kids will want to read or have this book read to them over and over again. Disclosure I received a free copy of this book by Peachtree Publishers for review. I was in no way compensated for this review. It is my own opinion.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Checked this book out from the library. Loved it so much that I not only bought a copy for my kids, have also given as gifts. Very fun, clever, great 'moral of the story', and awesome artwork.
Guest More than 1 year ago
We checked this book out at the library and my girls (ages 8, 6, and 6) loved it so much I'm going to buy it for our library. Clever ryhming with a delightful story.