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Moo Who?
     

Moo Who?

4.3 3
by Margie Palatini, Keith Graves (Illustrator)
 

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Hilda Mae Heifer is a cow who simply loves to sing. When a klunk on the head causes Hilda to forget what sound she's supposed to make -- Mew? Honk? Oink? -- it's up to her companions on the farm to help Hilda find her moo!

This lively laugh-out-loud picture book will appeal to even the youngest noisemakers.

Overview

Hilda Mae Heifer is a cow who simply loves to sing. When a klunk on the head causes Hilda to forget what sound she's supposed to make -- Mew? Honk? Oink? -- it's up to her companions on the farm to help Hilda find her moo!

This lively laugh-out-loud picture book will appeal to even the youngest noisemakers.

Editorial Reviews

The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (starred review)
“This overenthusiastic if daft bovine is certain to become a beloved storytime star…”
The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (starred review)
“This overenthusiastic if daft bovine is certain to become a beloved storytime star…”
The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"This overenthusiastic if daft bovine is certain to become a beloved storytime star…"
bn.com
The Barnes & Noble Review
An exuberant cow loses her moo power in a jubilant picture book by Zoom Broom and Bad Boys author Margie Palatini and illustrator Keith Graves. Caught in hilarious, exaggerated, dark-hued artwork, Hilda Mae Heifer's story begins when the singing bovine is out to pasture and gets hit on the head with a flying cow pie. Unfortunately, the spunky heifer gets knocked out, resulting in the tragic loss of her moo. After she tries honking -- which brings a frank discussion with a goose about the difference between his species and Hilda's -- she practices other animal sounds and has similar conferences with a newspaper-reading chicken, a muddy pig, and a yellow cat. Happily, though, Hilda's memory finally comes around and she regains her "melodic" moo, ending the tale with lots of laughs for readers as the other farm animals try to cope. Palatini hits the cow (er, make that nail) on the head with her plucky picture book, creating a lighthearted read that -- when joined with Graves's kooky illustrations -- might get kids practicing their own animal sounds between fits of giggles. A charming addition to story times, along with Hilda Must Be Dancing by Karma Wilson and illustrator Suzanne Watts, or Tony Mitton's Dinosaurumpus! Matt Warner
Publishers Weekly
When the cow Hilda Mae Heifer gets hit on the head by a flying cow pie, she wakes up clueless about the sound she's supposed to make. To the rest of the barnyard animals, that's no real tragedy. In fact, the general directive prior to her accident has been "Cover your ears when Hilda hit[s] a high note." But poor Hilda's quest to recover her sound seems to bring out the animals' benevolent side. Upon hearing the cow trying out his honk, a goose dons nerdy glasses, grabs a pointer and some visual aids, and lectures Hilda on what she is not. "Do you fly to Canada every year?" he says, map in tow. The pig, less successfully, tries to suggest that if Hilda were porcine she would most certainly have relatives who were "big boars"; Hilda thinks, "Maybe that did describe some members of her family." Palatini (Piggie Pie!) maintains a simultaneously arch and familiar tone throughout, narrating like a daffy relative, and Graves's (Frank Was a Monster Who Wanted to Dance) illustrations goose the jokes even more. His pictures-and his portrayal of the magnificently pink-snouted Hilda in particular-take on a corpulent plasticity. As for Hilda, she does indeed get her moo back. "Everyone else," writes Palatini, "got earplugs." Ages 4-7. (June) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Hilda Mae Heifer liked running, jumping, and, especially, singing. Her singing, although enthusiastic, was not always on key. Then one day, right in the middle of a "mi-mi-moo," a high-flying cow pie hit her on the head. She went down with a thump. When she came to, she had a lump on her forehead and did not know who she was. Sadly, Hilda had lost her moo. She wobbled about talking to other farm animals. She tried honking with a goose, peeping with a chicken, and oinking with a pig. All of these animals tried to persuade her that she was a cow and told her that cows go, "Moo." Finally the cat convinced Hilda that she was a cow. She tried mooing and it felt familiar. She sang with even more gusto than before. The rest of the animals got earplugs. Young children will delight in the humorous story and the colorful illustrations. Hilda is shown as a very round cow with red hair and an exaggerated snout. Her nostrils are huge. Other animals also have comically distorted features giving the book a cartoon-like appearance. A good preschool read aloud. 2004, Katherine Tegen Books/HarperCollins, Ages 3 to 6.
—Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-When Hilda Mae Heifer gets knocked on the noggin by a cow pie, she wakes up without her "moo." She meets a series of barnyard animals and tries imitating each one. They all tell her she's a cow and ask her questions to prove that she is not their kin, yet she is still "not convinced that mooing was what she should be doing." A cat finally gets her back to normal, and Hilda resumes her loud, off-key mooing, while "everyone else got earplugs." The lost-voice premise is not a new one, but Palatini's way with words and Graves's slightly manic artwork instill the characters and setting with freshness and humor. Strong rhythms, occasional rhymes ("You're no swine. You're bovine"), and a variety of puns ("Are your relatives big boars?") liven up the narrative. The illustrations are filled with purples, blues, and gray-greens, lending a fantastical aura to the farmyard world. The switch to white backgrounds when each creature quizzes the cow paces the tale neatly. Hilda's absurdly prominent purplish nostrils and her enthusiastically goofy facial expressions are right on target. The scholarly goose and the rest of the animal cast each have distinct looks. The vigorous energy of author and artist makes this otherwise basic tale a good choice for reading aloud, or for one-on-one sharing.-Steven Engelfried, Beaverton City Library, OR Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
More verbal paradiddles from the Principessa of Puns and Wordfoolery. Thanks to a hard cow pie to the head, bovine diva Hilda Mae Heifer loses both memory and the ability to emit her earsplitting (off-key) moos. Confused, she wobbles over to a goose and honks. " 'Lady, enough of that honking! You're a cow. You moo.' 'Who?' answered Hilda. 'Me? Moo?' " Similarly worded encounters with chicks and other livestock ensue. A foreshortened body behind huge, mottled purple nostrils in Grave's characteristically oddball illustrations, Hilda waddles forlornly about the barnyard, uncertainly repeating, "Moo-oo. Me? Moo?" until her memory and Wagnerian voice at last return. The plot's a bit too thin to give this the udder perfection of Bad Boys (2003) or Web Files (2001), but it should still incite guffaws, particularly read aloud. (Picture book. 6-8)
The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (starred review)
“This overenthusiastic if daft bovine is certain to become a beloved storytime star…”
The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“This overenthusiastic if daft bovine is certain to become a beloved storytime star…”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060001070
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/18/2007
Series:
Great Source Summer Success Reading Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
900,882
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 0.16(h) x (d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Margie Palatini is the author of many outrageously funny books for children, including Piggie Pie!, illustrated by Howard Fine; Moosetache, Mooseltoe, and the Bad Boys series, all illustrated by Henry Cole; The Cheese, illustrated by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher; No Biting, Louise, illustrated by Matthew Reinhart; and Gorgonzola, illustrated by Tim Bowers. She lives with her family in New Jersey.

Keith Graves is the author and illustrator of many of his own zany titles, including The Unexpectedly Bad Hair of Barcelona Smith, Three Nasty Gnarlies, Uncle Blubbafink's Seriously Ridiculous Stories, and Frank Was a Monster Who Wanted to Dance. He lives with his family in Texas.

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Moo Who? 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
book4children More than 1 year ago
Another super silly book. Hilda gets clonked in the head with a hardened cow pie and loses her moo. She searches high and low looking for the thing that she is supposed to do, but nothing she tries feels quite right. Perfect to read out loud to young kids, Moo Who? is humorous and witty. The unique illustration style adds to the silliness of the story while giving it extra personality. Bright colors invite the reader and listeners in to this crazy world where a cow can lose her moo and find it again.
Guest More than 1 year ago
We borrowed this from the library several months ago and my two-year-old boy LOVED it. Still, months after returning it, if I say, 'You're a cow,' he says, 'YOU MOO!'
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an hilarious tale of a battered bovine who has a temporary lapse of memory and seeks to find the correct sound to voice her feelings. The only hitch in the tale is the result of the illustrator, Keith Graves, who apparently never had much to do with cows, having given the heroine of this story not only her bottom teeth, which all good cows have, but a set of top teeth, which no bovine to date has ever had.