The Moon and Sixpence

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Overview

It seems unthinkable that Charles Strickland, the dull, bourgeois city gent, would have the tortured soul of a genius. Yet Strickland is driven to abandon his home, wife, and children to devote himself slavishly to painting. In a tiny studio in Paris he fills canvas after canvas, refusing to sell or even exhibit his work. Beset by poverty, sickness, and his own intransigent nature, he drifts to Tahiti, where, even after being blinded by leprosy, he produces some of his most extraordinary works of art. First ...
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Overview

It seems unthinkable that Charles Strickland, the dull, bourgeois city gent, would have the tortured soul of a genius. Yet Strickland is driven to abandon his home, wife, and children to devote himself slavishly to painting. In a tiny studio in Paris he fills canvas after canvas, refusing to sell or even exhibit his work. Beset by poverty, sickness, and his own intransigent nature, he drifts to Tahiti, where, even after being blinded by leprosy, he produces some of his most extraordinary works of art. First published in 1919 and inspired by the life of Paul Gauguin, The Moon and Sixpence is a study of a man possessed by the need to create - regardless of the cost to himself or others.

On a trip to research French artist Paul Gauguin, Maugham sailed into Tahiti's Papeet harbor, where he imagined an exotic tale of the ultimate outsider, one who rejects his entire way of life to pursue an obsession. The result of his efforts is a story of rebellion and escape from civilization which continues to attract and captivate readers to this day. Introduction by Perry Meisel.

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Editorial Reviews

Cyril Connolly
His excessively rare gift of storytelling...is almost an equal of imagination itself. -- The Sunday Times
Maxwell Anderson
When one closes the book and looks back over the varied scenes, civilized and barbaric, one has a memory of powerful and inevitable movement and the light and shadow of life itself.
—Maxwell Anderson, in Dial
From the Publisher
"[A] witty, compelling roman à clef...that mock[s] the way the world makes saints of the sinners who are often its best artists."  -The Boston Globe

"It is very difficult for a writer of my generation, if he is honest, to pretend indifference to the work of Somerset Maugham.... He was always so entirely there."  -Gore Vidal

From Barnes & Noble
Based on the life of Paul Gauguin, this book examines how each of us pursues our dreams. Maugham, one of the most popular English writer of our century, looks at the choices we make and forsake, as well as the consequences to those around us
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Product Details

Meet the Author

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) was an English novelist and playwright. Maugham was famous as a dramatist before he was known for his novels and short stories. His clarity of style, the perfection of his form, and the subtlety of his thought, thinly veiled by a worldly cynicism made him an international figure. Among his novels are Of Human Bondage, The Moon and Sixpence, and The Razor’s Edge.

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Read an Excerpt

The Moon and Sixpence


By W. Somerset Maugham

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 1995 Dover Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-11526-9


CHAPTER 1

I CONFESS that when first I made acquaintance with Charles Strickland I never for a moment discerned that there was in him anything out of the ordinary. Yet now few will be found to deny his greatness. I do not speak of that greatness which is achieved by the fortunate politician or the successful soldier; that is a quality which belongs to the place he occupies rather than to the man; and a change of circumstance reduces it to very discreet proportions. The Prime Minister out of office is seen, too often, to have been but a pompous rhetorician, and the General without an army is but the tame hero of a market town. The greatness of Charles Strickland was authentic. It may be that you do not like his art, but at all events you can hardly refuse it the tribute of your interest. He disturbs and arrests. The time has passed when he was an object of ridicule, and it is no longer a mark of eccentricity to defend or of perversity to extol him. His faults are accepted as the necessary complement to his merits. It is still possible to discuss his place in art, and the adulation of his admirers is perhaps no less capricious than the disparagement of his detractors; but one thing can never be doubtful, and that is that he had genius. To my mind the most interesting thing in art is the personality of the artist; and if that is singular, I am willing to excuse a thousand faults. I suppose Velasquez was a better painter than El Greco, but custom stales one's admiration for him: the Cretan, sensual and tragic, proffers the mystery of his soul like a standing sacrifice. The artist, painter, poet, or musician, by his decoration, sublime or beautiful, satisfies the aesthetic sense; but that is akin to the sexual instinct, and shares its barbarity: he lays before you also the greater gift of himself. To pursue his secret has something of the fascination of a detective story. It is a riddle which shares with the universe the merit of having no answer. The most insignificant of Strickland's works suggests a personality which is strange, tormented, and complex; and it is this surely which prevents even those who do not like his pictures from being indifferent to them; it is this which has excited so curious an interest in his life and character.

It was not till four years after Strickland's death that Maurice Huret wrote that article in the Mercure de France which rescued the unknown painter from oblivion and blazed the trail which succeeding writers, with more or less docility, have followed. For a long time no critic has enjoyed in France a more incontestable authority, and it was impossible not to be impressed by the claims he made; they seemed extravagant; but later judgements have confirmed his estimate, and the reputation of Charles Strickland is now firmly established on the lines which he laid down. The rise of this reputation is one of the most romantic incidents in the history of art. But I do not propose to deal with Charles Strickland's work except in so far as it touches upon his character. I cannot agree with the painters who claim superciliously that the layman can understand nothing of painting, and that he can best show his appreciation of their works by silence and a cheque-book. It is a grotesque misapprehension which sees in art no more than a craft comprehensible perfectly only to the craftsman: art is a manifestation of emotion, and emotion speaks a language that all may understand. But I will allow that the critic who has not a practical knowledge of technique is seldom able to say anything on the subject of real value, and my ignorance of painting is extreme. Fortunately, there is no need for me to risk the adventure, since my friend, Mr. Edward Leggatt, an able writer as well as an admirable painter, has exhaustively discussed Charles Strickland's work in a little book which is a charming example of a style, for the most part, less happily cultivated in England than in France.

Maurice Huret in his famous article gave an outline of Charles Strickland's life which was well calculated to whet the appetites of the inquiring. With his disinterested passion for art, he had a real desire to call the attention of the wise to a talent which was in the highest degree original; but he was too good a journalist to be unaware that the "human interest" would enable him more easily to effect his purpose. And when such as had come in contact with Strickland in the past, writers who had known him in London, painters who had met him in the cafés of Montmartre, discovered to their amazement that where they had seen but an unsuccessful artist, like another, authentic genius had rubbed shoulders with them, there began to appear in the magazines of France and America a succession of articles, the reminiscences of one, the appreciation of another, which added to Strickland's notoriety, and fed without satisfying the curiosity of the public. The subject was grateful, and the industrious Weitbrecht-Rotholz in his imposing monograph has been able to give a remarkable list of authorities.

The faculty for myth is innate in the human race. It seizes with avidity upon any incidents, surprising or mysterious, in the career of those who have at all distinguished themselves from their fellows, and invents a legend to which it then attaches a fanatical belief. It is the protest of romance against the commonplace of life. The incidents of the legend become the hero's surest passport to immortality. The ironic philosopher reflects with a smile that Sir Walter Raleigh is more safely enshrined in the memory of mankind because he set his cloak for the Virgin Queen to walk on than because he carried the English name to undiscovered countries. Charles Strickland lived obscurely. He made enemies rather than friends. It is not strange, then, that those who wrote of him should have eked out their scanty recollections with a lively fancy, and it is evident that there was enough in the little that was known of him to give opportunity to the romantic scribe; there was much in his life which was strange and terrible, in his character something outrageous, and in his fate not a little that was pathetic. In due course a legend arose of such circumstantiality that the wise historian would hesitate to attack it.

But a wise historian is precisely what the Rev. Robert Strickland is not. He wrote his biography avowedly to "remove certain misconceptions which had gained currency" in regard to the later part of his father's life, and which had "caused considerable pain to persons still living." It is obvious that there was much in the commonly received account of Strickland's life to embarrass a respectable family. I have read this work with a good deal of amusement, and upon this I congratulate myself, since it is colourless and dull. Mr. Strickland has drawn the portrait of an excellent husband and father, a man of kindly temper, industrious habits, and moral disposition. The modern clergyman has acquired in his study of the science which I believe is called exegesis an astonishing facility for explaining things away, but the subtlety with which the Rev. Robert Strickland has "interpreted" all the facts in his father's life which a dutiful son might find it convenient to remember must surely lead him in the fullness of time to the highest dignities of the Church. I see already his muscular calves encased in the gaiters episcopal. It was a hazardous, though maybe a gallant thing to do, since it is probable that the legend commonly received has had no small share in the growth of Strickland's reputation; for there are many who have been attracted to his art by the detestation in which they held his character or the compassion with which they regarded his death; and the son's well-meaning efforts threw a singular chill upon the father's admirers. It is due to no accident that when one of his most important works,The Woman of Samaria, was sold to Christie's shortly after the discussion which followed the publication of Mr. Strickland's biography, it fetched £235 less than it had done nine months before, when it was bought by the distinguished collector whose sudden death had brought it once more under the hammer. Perhaps Charles Strickland's power and originality would scarcely have sufficed to turn the scale if the remarkable mythopoeic faculty of mankind had not brushed aside with impatience a story which disappointed all its craving for the extraordinary. And presently Dr. Weitbrecht-Rotholz produced the work which finally set at rest the misgivings of all lovers of art.

Dr. Weitbrecht-Rotholz belongs to that school of historians which believes that human nature is not only about as bad as it can be, but a great deal worse; and certainly the reader is safer of entertainment in their hands than in those of the writers who take a malicious pleasure in representing the great figures of romance as patterns of the domestic virtues. For my part, I should be sorry to think that there was nothing. between Antony and Cleopatra but an economic situation; and it will require a great deal more evidence than is ever likely to be available, thank God, to persuade me that Tiberius was as blameless a monarch as King George V. Dr. Weitbrecht-Rotholz has dealt in such terms with the Rev. Robert Strickland's innocent biography that it is difficult to avoid feeling a certain sympathy for the unlucky parson. His decent reticence is branded as hypocrisy, his circumlocutions are roundly called lies, and his silence is vilified as treachery. And on the strength of peccadilloes, reprehensible in an author, but excusable in a son, the Anglo-Saxon race is accused of prudishness, humbug, pretentiousness, deceit, cunning, and bad cooking. Personally I think it was rash of Mr. Strickland, in refuting the account which had gained belief of a certain "unpleasantness" between his father and mother, to state that Charles Strickland in a letter written from Paris had described her as "an excellent woman," since Dr. Weitbrecht-Rotholz was able to print the letter in facsimile, and it appears that the passage referred to ran in fact as follows: God damn my wife. She is an excellent woman. I wish she was in hell. It is not thus that the Church in its great days dealt with evidence that was unwelcome.

Dr. Weitbrecht-Rotholz was an enthusiastic admirer of Charles Strickland, and there was no danger that he would whitewash him. He had an unerring eye for the despicable motive in actions that had all the appearance of innocence. He was a psycho-pathologist as well as a student of art, and the subconscious had few secrets from him. No mystic ever saw deeper meaning in common things. The mystic sees the ineffable and the psycho-pathologist the unspeakable. There is a singular fascination in watching the eagerness with which the learned author ferrets out every circumstance which may throw discredit on his hero. His heart warms to him when he can bring forward some example of cruelty or meanness, and he exults like an inquisitor at the auto da fé of an heretic when with some forgotten story he can confound the filial piety of the Rev. Robert Strickland. His industry has been amazing. Nothing has been too small to escape him, and you may be sure that if Charles Strickland left a laundry bill unpaid it will be given you in extenso, and if he forbore to return a borrowed half-crown no detail of the transaction will be omitted.

CHAPTER 2

WHEN so much has been written about Charles Strickland, it may seem unnecessary that I should write more. A painter's monument is his work. It is true I knew him more intimately than most: I met him first before ever he became a painter, and I saw him not infrequently during the difficult years he spent in Paris; but I do not suppose I should ever have set down my recollections if the hazards of the war had not taken me to Tahiti. There, as is notorious, he spent the last years of his life; and there I came across persons who were familiar with him. I find myself in a position to throw light on just that part of his tragic career which has remained most obscure. If they who believe in Strickland's greatness are right, the personal narratives of such as knew him in the flesh can hardly be superfluous. What would we not give for the reminiscences of someone who had been as intimately acquainted with El Greco as I was with Strickland?

But I seek refuge in no such excuses. I forget who it was that recommended men for their soul's good to do each day two things they disliked: it was a wise man, and it is a precept that I have followed scrupulously; for every day I have got up and I have gone to bed. But there is in my nature a strain of asceticism, and I have subjected my flesh each week to a more severe mortification. I have never failed to read the Literary Supplement of The Times. It is a salutary discipline to consider the vast number of books that are written, the fair hopes with which their authors see them published, and the fate which awaits them. What chance is there that any book will make its way among that multitude? And the successful books are but the successes of a season. Heaven knows what pains the author has been at, what bitter experiences he has endured and what heartache suffered, to give some chance reader a few hours' relaxation or to while away the tedium of a journey. And if I may judge from the reviews, many of these books are well and carefully written; much thought has gone to their composition; to some even has been given the anxious labour of a lifetime. The moral I draw is that the writer should seek his reward in the pleasure of his work and in release from the burden of his thoughts; and, indifferent to aught else, care nothing for praise or censure, failure or success.

Now the war has come, bringing with it a new attitude. Youth has turned to gods we of an earlier day knew not, and it is possible to see already the direction in which those who come after us will move. The younger generation, conscious of strength and tumultuous, have done with knocking at the door; they have burst in and seated themselves in our seats. The air is noisy with their shouts. Of their elders some, by imitating the antics of youth, strive to persuade themselves that their day is not yet over; they shout with the lustiest, but the war-cry sounds hollow in their mouth; they are like poor wantons attempting with pencil, paint, and powder, with shrill gaiety, to recover the illusion of their spring. The wiser go their way with a decent grace. In their chastened smile is an indulgent mockery. They remember that they too trod down a sated generation, with just such clamour and with just such scorn, and they foresee that these brave torchbearers will presently yield their place also. There is no last word. The new evangel was old when Nineveh reared her greatness to the sky. These gallant words which seem so novel to those that speak them were said in accents scarcely changed a hundred times before. The pendulum swings backwards and forwards. The circle is ever travelled anew.

Sometimes a man survives a considerable time from an era in which he had his place into one which is strange to him, and then the curious are offered one of the most singular spectacles in the human comedy. Who now, for example, thinks of George Crabbe? He was a famous poet in his day, and the world recognized his genius with a unanimity which the greater complexity of modern life has rendered infrequent. He had learnt his craft at the school of Alexander Pope, and he wrote moral stories in rhymed couplets. Then came the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars, and the poets sang new songs. Mr. Crabbe continued to write moral stories in rhymed couplets. I think he must have read the verse of these young men who were making so great a stir in the world, and I fancy he found it poor stuff. Of course, much of it was. But the odes of Keats and of Wordsworth, a poem or two by Coleridge, a few more by Shelley, discovered vast realms of the spirit that none had explored before. Mr. Crabbe was as dead as mutton, but Mr. Crabbe continued to write moral stories in rhymed couplets. I have read desultorily the writings of the younger generation. It may be that among them a more fervid Keats, a more ethereal Shelley, has already published numbers the world will willingly remember. I cannot tell. I admire their polish — their youth is already so accomplished that it seems absurd to speak of promise— I marvel at the felicity of their style; but with all their copiousness (their vocabulary suggests that they fingered Roget's Thesaurus in their cradles) they say nothing to me: to my mind they know too much and feel too obviously; I cannot stomach the heartiness with which they slap me on the back or the emotion with which they hurl themselves on my bosom; their passion seems to me a little anaemic and their dreams a trifle dull. I do not like them. I am on the shelf. I will continue to write moral stories in rhymed couplets. But I should be thrice a fool if I did it for aught but my own entertainment.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Moon and Sixpence by W. Somerset Maugham. Copyright © 1995 Dover Publications, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 22 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 4, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The extraordinary clothed in mediocrity

    The need for artistic expression takes a man out of a life of mediocrity, and transports him half way across the world, to a life of poverty which allows him to access the true richness of expression which he seeks. To seek one's destiny in a life of adventure, or to find comfort in a life of convention -- that is the tension between this work, and the author's masterwork "Of Human Bondage." Each reaching its own conclusion, while exploring the dialectic of the spiritual and the temporal, searching deep into man's soul, seeking refuge from the banality of life. A fine read, enchanting and remarkable for its language and its breadth of scope. A highly recommended selection.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2001

    One of my Favorite Books of all Times.

    From England to France to Tahiti, this tale of art,human nature and passion is incredible. I read this book thrice and still pick it up to reread some favorite sections. Maugham is one of my favorite authors. He is the best short story writer have ever read. I highly recommend his short stories and novels especially The Razors Edge and Cake and Ale.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Book That Makes You Think

    The Moon and Sixpence by William Somerset Maugham is a novel loosely based on the life of painter, Paul Gauguin. This novel is one of the most interesting books I have ever read because the eccentric set of people the story revolves around. Maugham's analysis of his characters makes them come to life, and they were so vivid I was not able to put the book down.

    Maugham was an English playwright and author, his works include: The Razor's Edge, Of Human Bondage, The Painted Vail, Cakes and Ale, and many more. The Moon and Sixpence came to Maugham when he traveled to Tahiti to study the French artist Paul Gauguin, and imagined the story of the painter's life from a different perspective.

    The leading character, Charles Strickland, abandons his job as a stockbroker, his family of four, and his entire life in England unannounced to pursue painting in France. In this transitional move to France he becomes indifferent to people and their emotions. Some could consider him cruel while others find his honesty refreshing, but either way he shows no affection to those who enter his life or those who leave it. The book follows Strickland and his work from France to Tahiti, where the story ends. Strickland's unwillingness to compromise for his pursuit of art is unbelievable.

    The character descriptions were the best part of the book for me. Maugham did a wonderful job making his characters come to life, and play with the reader's emotions. Strickland could easily be viewed as the villain in this novel because of his attitude, but is to be respected for is ingenuity. In some aspects his persistence for truth and independence could be seen as heroism and genius. Maugham challenges audiences to decide for themselves what they believe is "right" or "correct" in the story, and because of this readers must take an active role in the book.

    Although I enjoyed this book, it isn't an easy read. Because the reader must constantly analyze the story, the book can be a chore, and there is no moment of relaxation. Also, the plot is interesting but moves slowly. The book is largely dependent on the description of the characters, as opposed to the story line. If you are looking for an action packed book, this may not be the one for you. Maugham could have spent a little more time illustrating the chain of events; the book could read a little easier.

    The Moon in Sixpence, overall, was well worth the read. It leaves the reader with questions of what is morality and has the capability to change one's perspective completely. I would suggest it to anyone who is an art lover, as you will see many relations and references to the art world and Gauguin's life. I would also suggest this book to F. Scott Fitzgerald fans, because the styles and focus of Fitzgerald novels are very similar to that of Maugham.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2007

    A reviewer

    im reading 'The moon and sixpence' because we are given this story for home reading & i think that there is something very deep and philosophical in this story.its not a simple life story of a man who desperately wants to paint its a kind of human tragedy.im waiting for the end of this story with great excitement:'

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2014

    Hdv

    Bbd

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2014

    Oops - Good scan

    Apologies. This scan was OK. Was referring to another version of the same title which was from a NY library and scanned by Google. This version seems to be fine...crisp and clean.

    One of my favorite books. The story of a truly self actualized human being.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2013

    Bad Scan

    This book was scanned by Google but not proofed. Wrong or incomplete words all over.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2013

    Always a good read

    Was that the ending paragraph or was a last page left out i dont quiet remember it ended that way perhaps it was the movie page counter

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2012

    Shinohara Ayumi

    Went to result of one for "Japan". Please help!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2012

    Sissy

    I don't understand,maybe a reader of the book can explain it to me, why this book is dvertised as "...gay and lesbian relationships..." when I can see nothing to indicate this. It has either been mislabled or I'm hust not getting it. I do like the story and all of Maugham's works. He was genius at his craft

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted August 17, 2011

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