The Moon and Sixpence (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

The Moon and Sixpence (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

3.9 24
by W. Somerset Maugham
     
 

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This edition includes a modern introduction and a list of suggested further reading.
 

Based on the life of French post-impressionist artist Paul Gauguin, The Moon and Sixpence builds on a long tradition of European writing about the South Pacific as an exotic locale.  It also marks the transformation of British writer W.

Overview


This edition includes a modern introduction and a list of suggested further reading.
 

Based on the life of French post-impressionist artist Paul Gauguin, The Moon and Sixpence builds on a long tradition of European writing about the South Pacific as an exotic locale.  It also marks the transformation of British writer W. Somerset Maughm from celebrated playwright to accomplished novelist.   

 In The Moon and Sixpence, Charles Strickland, is a respectable London stockbroker who decides in middle age to abandon his wife and children and devote himself to his true passion: art. Strickland’s destructive desire for self-expression takes him first to Paris to learn the craft of painting, and finally to Tahiti in the South Pacific.  The Moon and Sixpence remains a complex and engaging novel echoing Maugham’s own struggles between artistic expression and public respectability, and between his public persona and private life.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781411466197
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
03/13/2012
Series:
Barnes & Noble Digital Library
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
975,757
File size:
420 KB

Meet the Author



W. Somerset Maugham (1874–1965) is best known as a playwright and short-story writer. He was born in Paris, orphaned at ten, and abruptly transported first to the house of a provincial English clergyman uncle and then to the harsh environment of a British boarding school.  A closeted homosexual moving in bohemian circles in London and Paris, Maugham took his revenge on his past suffering and present insecurities through fiction.

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The Moon and Sixpence 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
DrSaunders More than 1 year ago
The need for artistic expression takes a man out of a life of mediocrity, and transports him half way across the world, to a life of poverty which allows him to access the true richness of expression which he seeks. To seek one's destiny in a life of adventure, or to find comfort in a life of convention -- that is the tension between this work, and the author's masterwork "Of Human Bondage." Each reaching its own conclusion, while exploring the dialectic of the spiritual and the temporal, searching deep into man's soul, seeking refuge from the banality of life. A fine read, enchanting and remarkable for its language and its breadth of scope. A highly recommended selection.
Guest More than 1 year ago
From England to France to Tahiti, this tale of art,human nature and passion is incredible. I read this book thrice and still pick it up to reread some favorite sections. Maugham is one of my favorite authors. He is the best short story writer have ever read. I highly recommend his short stories and novels especially The Razors Edge and Cake and Ale.
Colbi_Beam More than 1 year ago
The Moon and Sixpence by William Somerset Maugham is a novel loosely based on the life of painter, Paul Gauguin. This novel is one of the most interesting books I have ever read because the eccentric set of people the story revolves around. Maugham's analysis of his characters makes them come to life, and they were so vivid I was not able to put the book down. Maugham was an English playwright and author, his works include: The Razor's Edge, Of Human Bondage, The Painted Vail, Cakes and Ale, and many more. The Moon and Sixpence came to Maugham when he traveled to Tahiti to study the French artist Paul Gauguin, and imagined the story of the painter's life from a different perspective. The leading character, Charles Strickland, abandons his job as a stockbroker, his family of four, and his entire life in England unannounced to pursue painting in France. In this transitional move to France he becomes indifferent to people and their emotions. Some could consider him cruel while others find his honesty refreshing, but either way he shows no affection to those who enter his life or those who leave it. The book follows Strickland and his work from France to Tahiti, where the story ends. Strickland's unwillingness to compromise for his pursuit of art is unbelievable. The character descriptions were the best part of the book for me. Maugham did a wonderful job making his characters come to life, and play with the reader's emotions. Strickland could easily be viewed as the villain in this novel because of his attitude, but is to be respected for is ingenuity. In some aspects his persistence for truth and independence could be seen as heroism and genius. Maugham challenges audiences to decide for themselves what they believe is "right" or "correct" in the story, and because of this readers must take an active role in the book. Although I enjoyed this book, it isn't an easy read. Because the reader must constantly analyze the story, the book can be a chore, and there is no moment of relaxation. Also, the plot is interesting but moves slowly. The book is largely dependent on the description of the characters, as opposed to the story line. If you are looking for an action packed book, this may not be the one for you. Maugham could have spent a little more time illustrating the chain of events; the book could read a little easier. The Moon in Sixpence, overall, was well worth the read. It leaves the reader with questions of what is morality and has the capability to change one's perspective completely. I would suggest it to anyone who is an art lover, as you will see many relations and references to the art world and Gauguin's life. I would also suggest this book to F. Scott Fitzgerald fans, because the styles and focus of Fitzgerald novels are very similar to that of Maugham.
Guest More than 1 year ago
im reading 'The moon and sixpence' because we are given this story for home reading & i think that there is something very deep and philosophical in this story.its not a simple life story of a man who desperately wants to paint its a kind of human tragedy.im waiting for the end of this story with great excitement:'
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Apologies. This scan was OK. Was referring to another version of the same title which was from a NY library and scanned by Google. This version seems to be fine...crisp and clean. One of my favorite books. The story of a truly self actualized human being.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Was that the ending paragraph or was a last page left out i dont quiet remember it ended that way perhaps it was the movie page counter
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Bbd
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Went to result of one for "Japan". Please help!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I don't understand,maybe a reader of the book can explain it to me, why this book is dvertised as "...gay and lesbian relationships..." when I can see nothing to indicate this. It has either been mislabled or I'm hust not getting it. I do like the story and all of Maugham's works. He was genius at his craft