The Moon Is Down

( 48 )

Overview

Unabridged, 3 CDs, 4 hours

Read by George Guidell

Occupied by enemy troops, a small, peaceable town comes face-to-face with evil imposed from the outside-and betrayal born within the close-knit community

Originally published at the zenith of Nazi Germany's power, this masterful fable uncovers profound, often unsettling truths about war-and about human nature. Steinbeck's self-described "celebration of the ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Audiobook)
  • All (3) from $48.49   
  • Used (3) from $48.49   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$48.49
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(23212)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Good
Our feedback rating says it all: Five star service and fast delivery! We have shipped four million items to happy customers, and have one MILLION unique items ready to ship today!

Ships from: Toledo, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$48.49
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(23212)

Condition: Good
Our feedback rating says it all: Five star service and fast delivery! We have shipped four million items to happy customers, and have one MILLION unique items ready to ship today!

Ships from: Toledo, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$160.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(43)

Condition: Good
Buy with Confidence. Excellent Customer Support. We ship from multiple US locations. No CD, DVD or Access Code Included.

Ships from: Fort Mill, SC

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
The Moon Is Down

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

Unabridged, 3 CDs, 4 hours

Read by George Guidell

Occupied by enemy troops, a small, peaceable town comes face-to-face with evil imposed from the outside-and betrayal born within the close-knit community

Originally published at the zenith of Nazi Germany's power, this masterful fable uncovers profound, often unsettling truths about war-and about human nature. Steinbeck's self-described "celebration of the durability of democracy" had an extraordinary impact as Allied propaganda in Nazi-occupied Europe. Despite Axis efforts to suppress it (in Fascist Italy, mere possession of the book was punishable by death), The Moon Is Down was secretly translated into French, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Swedish, German, Italian, and Russian; hundreds of thousands of copies circulated throughout Europe, making it by far the most popular piece of propaganda under the occupation. Few literary works of our time have demonstrated so triumphantly the power of ideas in the face of cold steel and brute force.

In this masterful account set in Norway during World War II, Steinbeck explores the effects of invasion on both the conquered and the conquerors. Occupied by Nazi troops, a small, peaceable town comes face to face with evil imposed from the outside--and betrayal born within the close-knit community.

Read More Show Less

What People Are Saying

From the Publisher
John Steinbeck knew and understood America and Americans better than any other writer of the twentieth century. (The Dallas Morning News) A man whose work was equal to the vast social themes that drove him. (Don DeLillo)"
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780142429266
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/29/2011
  • Format: CD
  • Pages: 1
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 5.80 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

JOHN STEINBECK (1902—1968) was born in Salinas, California. He worked as a laborer and a journalist, and in 1935, when he published Tortilla Flat, he achieved popular success and financial security. Steinbeck wrote more than twenty-five novels and won the Nobel Prize in 1962. Nearly all of his books are available in Penguin Classics.

Biography

John Ernst Steinbeck, Nobel and Pulitzer Prize winner, was born in Salinas, California February 27, 1902. His father, John Steinbeck, served as Monterey County Treasurer for many years. His mother, Olive Hamilton, was a former schoolteacher who developed in him a love of literature. Young Steinbeck came to know the Salinas Valley well, working as a hired hand on nearby ranches in Monterey County. In 1919, he graduated from Salinas High School as president of his class and entered Stanford University majoring in English. Stanford did not claim his undivided attention. During this time he attended only sporadically while working at a variety jobs including on with the Big Sur highway project, and one at Spreckels Sugar Company near Salinas.

Steinbeck left Stanford permanently in 1925 to pursue a career in writing in New York City. He was unsuccessful and returned, disappointed, to California the following year. Though his first novel, Cup of Gold, was published in 1929, it attracted little literary attention. Two subsequent novels, The Pastures of Heaven and To A God Unknown, met the same fate.

After moving to the Monterey Peninsula in 1930, Steinbeck and his new wife, Carol Henning, made their home in Pacific Grove. Here, not far from famed Cannery Row, heart of the California sardine industry, Steinbeck found material he would later use for two more works, Tortilla Flat and Cannery Row.

With Tortilla Flat (1935), Steinbeck's career took a decidedly positive turn, receiving the California Commonwealth Club's Gold Medal. He felt encouraged to continue writing, relying on extensive research and personal observation of the human drama for his stories. In 1937, Of Mice and Men was published. Two years later, the novel was produced on Broadway and made into a movie. In 1940, Steinbeck won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for Grapes of Wrath, bringing to public attention the plight of dispossessed farmers.

After Steinbeck and Henning divorced in 1942, he married Gwyndolyn Conger. The couple moved to New York City and had two sons, Thomas and two years later, John. During the war years, Steinbeck served as a war correspondent for the New York Herald Tribune. Some of his dispatches reappeared in Once There Was A War. In 1945, Steinbeck published Cannery Row and continued to write prolifically, producing plays, short stories and film scripts. In 1950, he married Elaine Anderson Scott and they remained together until his death.

Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962 "...for his realistic as well as imaginative writings, distinguished by a sympathetic humor and keen social perception.." In his acceptance speech, Steinbeck summarized what he sought to achieve through his works:

"...Literature is as old as speech. It grew out of human need for it and it has not changed except to become more needed. The skalds, the bards, the writers are not separate and exclusive. From the beginning, their functions, their duties, their responsibilities have been decreed by our species...Further more, the writer is delegated to declare and to celebrate man's proven capacity of greatness of heart and spirit—gallantry in defeat, for courage, compassion and love. In the endless war against weakness and despair, these are the bright rally flags of hope and emulation. I hold that a writer who does not passionately believe in the perfectibility of man has no dedication nor any membership in literature..."

Steinbeck remained a private person, shunning publicity and moving frequently in his search for privacy. He died on December 20, 1968 in New York City, where he and his family made a home. But his final resting place was the valley he had written about with such passion. At his request, his ashes were interred in the Garden of Memories cemetery in Salinas. He is survived by his son, Thomas.

Author biography courtesy of the National Steinbeck Center.

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Amnesia Glasscock
      John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (full name); Amnesia Glasscock
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 27, 1902
    2. Place of Birth:
      Salinas, California
    1. Date of Death:
      December 20, 1968
    2. Place of Death:
      New York, New York

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 48 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(23)

4 Star

(18)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 48 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The Moon is Down

    Simply a masterpiece. A review cannot do this work of literature justice. Steinbeck's perfect prose and amazing understanding of humanity and its civilizations make this one of the most eerily realistic works of fiction I have ever read. The characters are essentially: The Conquerors and The Conquered. Each possessing of an array of different people with different personalities and quirks. It's a short, easy read that is as enjoyable as literature as it is a piece of commentary.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2009

    Review for Honors English 9 Million Word Project 5

    The Moon Is Down is an inspiring tale that illustrates both sides of a war. The Nazis act as if they are in control of the situation, but because they are concentrating on the war so intensely, they have no idea how it is affecting them. The soldiers begin to become terrorized by the war. I like how John Steinbeck shows empathy for these men of war and prove that underneath their rugged uniform is just another human being with human qualities. I found it boring how Steinbeck just directly stated the characters' personalities and what their history was. It would've made the book more interesting if Steinbeck gave inferences and let you draw your own conclusions about the characters. I especially enjoyed Steinbeck twist in his story when the soldiers turned into the victims and the citizens became the villains and made the soldiers fear them. I felt that Mayor Orden is the ideal politician that all politicians should strive to become. He shows zero trepidation when the soldiers are entering his house and he never made a single move without the consent of what the townspeople would want. As they are holding a gun to his head and are about to kill him he still never gives in to what the Nazis want. The thing that I found to be very strange was the amount of trust that the citizens had in Mayor Orden. Never did they once test his leadership skills. Even in today's society this is extremely unlikely. There are usually a few people who are on both sides to what the government is doing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    Review for Ms. O'Holla's English Honors II class

    I would consider this novel a great work by author John Steinbeck. Though it may come across as overly simplistic at first, it is this simplicity that makes it so deep. The novel depicts both sides of war, that of the conquerors and the conquered. The novel, which was written as anti-Nazi propaganda, surprisingly depicts the German soldiers as human beings with feelings just like the villagers, as opposed to cruel heartless savages. In my opinion this is what makes the book so spectacular. By depicting the Nazis as normal people, it gives the novel a greater sense of reality and allows the reader to feel more of a relation to the characters. Not only do the Nazis have feelings, but more importantly, they have weaknesses too. Steinbeck describes their fear of the townspeople and how, though they are the individuals conquering the town, they are frightened of its inhabitants and wish to return home. I find this to be quite an interesting and effective approach in the work. In most cases, propaganda would depict the enemy as a villain, but Steinbeck depicts them as nothing more than weak, unstable individuals, giving his readers a feeling of confidence. Also, in an effort to help his readers relate to the book, the story takes place in an unnamed town in an unnamed country. This is quite ingenious because it allows any reader to see themselves in the story. The novel itself is essentially about nothing more than the two viewpoints of war, but the method which this is done is what makes it a masterpiece. Steinbeck¿s way of depicting neither side as an enemy is masterful and unique making the novel a piece to be not only enjoyed but respected.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2006

    Eerie parallel to present-day Iraq

    Has anybody else noticed that Steinbeck's fable of occupation and resistance sounds a lot like what must be going on in Iraq these days? How ironic that America, once the liberator, is now the occupier. As i read this short novel, I could imagine U.S. soldiers in Baghdad experiencing similar feelings as the Nazi soldiers -- I appreciate how Steinbeck compassionately painted their humanity too, as well as their cruelty. War does indeed to horrible things to everybody, on all sides. Excellent read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2012

    Not 70 years in the past

    But n the very presentt

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 2, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Not Worth Your Time

    The Moon Is Down is a story of war. Of a conquered people and their conquerors. You cannot tell from the story when or where this book really takes place. The British and Germans are involved but that is about all you can really tell. The story is about a small town with a coalmine and the conquering forces trying to get coal out of the mine. My issue with this story is that it was written in such a pedantic way that you never seem to make any progress. And at the end, are you no further along than you were at the beginning (you still have people being occupied). I finished reading it thinking it wasn't written very well, the plot was terrible and the characters never developed because they had no depth to begin with. A real waste of my time.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 16, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Meh

    I thought The Moon Is Down was just alright. I definitely prefer Steinbeck's 'America' books that take place in the west. While this novella was enjoyable, I didn't connect to it the way I do with most of his other work.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 1, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    World War II Propaganda

    I love John Steinbeck's writing, and this book, one of his many contributions to the war effort, displays his style, humanity, and ability to vividly describe people and emotions and places and machines. It's obvious propaganda, but serves as great fiction as well. Anything by Steinbeck is a quality read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2007

    H.R. English Honors II, 3A

    This book was both interesting and full of meaning. Although not all the soldiers¿ characters were fully developed, Steinbeck pulled them all together to create a representation of any soldier. Also, even though it is clear that the story occurred during World War II, it can be put into almost any war setting which adds a completely new aspect to the book. One thing I specifically enjoyed about this book was the realistic development of the townspeople throughout the book. Steinbeck shows that even though they started off as warm friendly people, it only takes one instance of hatred to turn them around. Also, as the book progressed, the townspeople became stronger and by the end learned how to stand up against the enemy. This was an intriguing and strong ending that really brought the whole book together.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2007

    The Moon is Down

    This novel is excellent because it shows a world inwhich there are no 'evil' people even in times of war. Steinbeck makes the towns people develop. He has motifs and archetypes in his novels. The novel has a lot of action making it interesting to read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2007

    A reviewer

    'The Moon is Down' was a very interesting book. Though I don't normally enjoy summer books, I can honestly say that I liked this one a lot. One of the reasons I loved the book is because of Steinbeck's simplistic writing style. He made the book enjoyable for all ages and wrote in such a way that the reader could clearly see the messages conveyed in the novel without be bored with details about setting etc. Also, his characters were ones the reader could relate to as he characterized them in such a realistic manner.Unlike most at the time, Steinbeck chose not to stereotype the soldiers as monstrous creatures but rather, as human beings who longed for what all people long for-love, warmth, and happiness. He shows that in war, everyone, not just the weaker country, is a victim. Lastly, though the book was set in an unnamed European country, it reeked of the American spirit. The rebellious, fighting attitudes of the townspeople easily remind one of the daring spirits of the forefathers of our nation during the American Revolution. This further developed an image in my mind of how strong and determined the townspeople were. The atmosphere and themes developed in the book are truly outstanding, making this book a must read for everyone.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2007

    NS 3A English

    This novel by John Steinbeck was very interesting. It had many scenes where there was no 'evil' and sometimes the townspeople 'supposed to be good looked evil. I found that to be very creative since not many writes create worlds with no 'evil.' All the character were developed and the 3rd person omniscient point of view made me feel like all the character not only 1. I like how they have several motifs and archetypes which helped the readers understand the setting of the book better. One of which that everyone should pay attention to is the snow. The connection with the Nazis is good too because it shows that even though the Nazis were thought to be very evil. I liked how the ending was because you wouldn't exactly know what happens unless you know the historical facts about the Nazis. The introduction in our novel was very helpful because it helped me get the background of the book before reading so I would really recommend that everyone reads the introduction to help understand the ending better. I also recommend this book because it had a lot of action. And if you are like me and get bored very easily, I'm going to tell you that this book will keep you engaged in it all throughout. And the development of the character (mainly the town) shows that there could be large groups of people in the world that can come together like the Americans and revolt. The use of heroes (tragic) makes the novel better because it shows how people of the town are willing to take their own life just so the town could get free.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    Review by a student

    The Moon Is Down is a unique and interesting look at the situation of World War 2. It does not villainize or stereotype. Instead, it shows that all people, average citizens and Nazis alike, are subject to human emotion and human weakness. Some critics criticized Steinbeck for making the Nazis too human, and not evil enough. I disagree. The Nazis did horrible, unforgivable things, but they were still people, and showing them as such makes the book more realistic. Because the characters are shown as real people with real faults and imperfections, it is easy to believe that what happens in the book could actually have occured. Indeed, many people reading the book in other countries at the time were suprised at how well Steinbeck depicts their situation. One thing I did not like about the book was that it failed to adress the persecution of the Jewish communities in Germany, and the countries taken over by Germany. I think that this is a very important issue that should not have been overlooked.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2007

    Honors English 3A

    The Moon is Down is a great novel that I would recommend to anyone. It is a simple story about a small town in Europe inhabited by local townspeople and the invading Nazi soldiers during World War II. However, John Steinbeck creates a more meaningful piece of literature by discarding the typical theme of good verses evil and writing a novel that has more depth. Unlike many novels that depict war, Steinbeck never portrays either side as the enemy, but instead as two separate bodies of people fighting with one another. Steinbeck expresses both the internal and external hardships experienced by the townspeople as well as the Nazi soldiers as a result from the invasion. By illustrating the personalities of individuals, Steinbeck is able to re-humanizes the soldiers. Also, this novel in enriched with subtle yet powerful images to intrigue readers.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2007

    M.C. English Honors 2, block 3A

    This was a good book, and I enjoyed it a lot. I liked how Steinbeck portrayed the enemy army as reluctant and dishearted to murder people and destroy the town, as opposed to the usual way of thinking of the evil and vicious enemy. This shows that there are good and bad qualities in everyone. Additionally, the peaceful townspeople grow cold and gloom hangs over the town. I felt this was important as it shows that war changes people, and that the 'good' people can become evil too. It's intresting because Steinbeck characterizes the two opposing groups (invaders and invaded) differently than what people would normally characterize them. For example, the invaders start out idealistic, and grow meek and frightened as the war goes on. The invaders would normally be portrayed as fierce, powerful, and hating, not meek and frightened. As for the invaded, they start as peaceful and confused citizens, then grow cold and hating. Cold and hating are normally characterisitcs of the invaders as meek and frightened are usually characteristics of the invaded. The Moon is Down is the first of Steinbeck's works that I have read, and I would definetely like to read another one.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2007

    Mrs. OHalla's Honors 2 class

    This book may only be little more than 100 pages long and may not contain many complex words, but it is deeply insightful and interesting. The Moon is Down delves into the psyche of both the conquerors and the conquered during the military occupation of a small town. The conquerors, although their nationality is never revealed, most probably represent the Nazi's during WWII. This book was written around that time, used as propaganda all over Europe. It was a very popular novel, although that also had to do with Steinbeck being one of the most prominent American writers of the time. What makes it interesting is that Steinbeck does not portrays the invaders as ruthless, unfeeling soldiers. He humanizes them by showing their vulnerabilities and somewhat sympathizes with their strong desire to go back home. At certain times, Steinbeck depicts the villagers as cruel and the soldiers as helpless. After it was published, many critics detracted him for sympathizing with the Nazi¿s and thus reducing the book¿s value as propaganda. Of course, these critics were proved wrong when the book spread like wildfire throughout Europe. It truly is an interesting book, and I recommend it to anyone who enjoys Steinbeck, or anyone who enjoys concise, well-written American literature.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    English 3 honors

    In general, this book was pretty good. To me, it definitely stood out from the rest of the novels that i've read, because Steinbeck doesnt just develop one point of view. He gets rid of the superficial labels of 'villian' and 'victim', and allows readers to feel a sense of compassion for the supposed 'villian' side. Steinbeck gives them very humanly qualities, which makes the readers hesitate on whether or not to love or hate them throughout the course of the novel. It's a good thing that he chose to write in this perspective because if you think of nazi soldiers, automatically, your opinion towards them would be negative, and I think that the author just wanted to let everyone know that they too, are human. Also, this book was a nice way to read about what it was like during World War II--much more interesting than reading from a boring textbook. But all in all, I recommend this book to everyone, because it's a great piece of american literature, because it's an easy read and really gives you a whole new outlook.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    The moon is Down

    The novel, The moon is down by Stephen Crane, is one that looks at war from the prospective of both the conquerors and the conquered. It focuses on human nature and shows how in spite of our different roles in this world, when it comes to war, we are equally affected by battle. I appreciate how Stephen Crane depicts both groups without being bias or taking sides. Crane does not portray the enemy soldiers as evil and wicked. They are men who have a job to do, but on the inside they desperately want to return home to the love and comfort of their families. Not only this but the coldness of the townspeople instills a fear in the troops, fear that the people will revolt. Throughout the novel, Crane shows how this fear keeps them in distress and anxious about what the invasion could lead to. Crane also develops the townspeople as being a determined group that refuses to be conquered. They are a village of free people and they intend to stay that way. Even in the event of the invasion, when the townspeople are most vulnerable, they bond together for the sake of each other and of course for freedom. Crane allows the reader to choose sides in The Moon is Down. He also brings to light the struggles that plague the human mind during war, no matter what side of the battlefield someone is on.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    A reviewer

    Although harshly criticized by the critics of the era, John Steinbeck's novel, u The Moon is Down /u , was prevalently appreciated by many populations of a variety of war-faced countries. Because of his sympathetic development of not only the conquered, but the conqueror, Steinbeck puts a twist on the cliche image of 'violent invaders'. While many countries tried to ban his work, the propaganda spread, showing appreciation towards not only his unique literary styles, but also for his recognition of the soldiers internal conflicts and the subdued one's growing rebellion. Personally, the depictions of the soldiers, assumed to be Nazis, helped create a sense of humanity behind their imperialistic incentives and duties. In the same way, Steinbeck efficiently incorporates the poignant title, 'Moon Is Down', from Shakespeare's play Macbeth, as it implied that 'danger was on it's way', bolstering the consistent fears the townspeople faced. At the same time, Steinbeck had a few duller moments in his writing technique. For example, when developing each soldier as an individual, Steinbeck blatantly states each physical and emotional characteristic, in separate paragraphs, in almost a list format. Such development is usually performed through the characters actions or through inferences made by description. Overall, though, the book was a heartwarming war story, that didn't involve victory and heroism as seen in majority of war novels. Proving his non-bias as he never even states that the soldiers were Nazis, Steinbeck gave a realistic point of view on the invasion, creating a novel thats relative to all of mankind, at a human perspective.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2007

    The Moon is Down

    John Steinbeck's 'The Moon is Down' exhibits all the characteristics of an everlasting classic. The author skillfully portrays the Nazi soldiers as commanding but he also reveals a deeper, quieter side that allows the readers to reflect on the hardships that war has on both the invaders and the invaded. The townspeople are suddenly out of their element as they realize that their freedom has been ripped away from them. The reader can connect with these simple characters that develop over the course of the book, and feel like they are experiencing the effects of war right along with them. This book exhibits the themes of betrayal, which is born within the community, pride which is found in the citizens eyes, and revenge as the quiet citizens find their voices. Not only does Steinbeck create life-like characters but he also depicts vivid settings that prove to be crucial to the plot development. The reader will be mesmerized at how Steinbeck ironically creates a peaceful and serene outdoor setting though hate crawls through every household and people are in fright. Steinbeck also uses snow as a recurring archetype that hides the evil which parades through the streets. This is a story of how a quiet village which 'doesn't like to be conquered' fights for a chance at revenge against the powerful Nazi soldiers '111'. John Steinbeck details and uses of imagery allow his novel 'The Moon is Down' to stand out from all the other war novels. Though this book is simple, it leaves the reader to reflect and possibly change their opinion about war.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 48 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)