The Moon Jumpers

The Moon Jumpers

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by Janice May Udry, Maurice Sendak
     
 

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Four years before Where the Wild Things Are won the Caldecott Medal, Maurice Sendak produced some of his most spectacular artwork for The Moon Jumpers. Printing technology has greatly improved since this enchanting picture book was first released more than fifty years ago, and now, with new color separations, the reproduction of Maurice Sendak'

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Overview

Four years before Where the Wild Things Are won the Caldecott Medal, Maurice Sendak produced some of his most spectacular artwork for The Moon Jumpers. Printing technology has greatly improved since this enchanting picture book was first released more than fifty years ago, and now, with new color separations, the reproduction of Maurice Sendak's artwork comes closer to his stunning originals than ever before. Sendak's wondrous starry skies and Janice May Udry's evocative text immediately transport us back to cool, moonlit nights and fill us with the universal warmth of childhood. The Moon Jumpers' timeless beauty and inspiration earned it a Caldecott Honor in 1960 and will surely gather a new generation of fans.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The late Sendak received a Caldecott Honor in 1960 for his paintings of a group of children cavorting by moonlight in this quiet story from Udry, which is being rereleased in anticipation of the 50th anniversary of Where the Wild Things Are in 2013. Sendak’s images alternate between small, squarish, b&w vignettes—an owl perched on a branch, a woman and her husband poring over a book indoors—and full-bleed scenes of the children’s nocturnal play, as they dance and tumble like Matisse figures on the lawn. The hushed quality of Udry’s prose (“The warm night-wind tosses our hair. The wind chimes stir”) is a lovely companion to the deep blues, greens, and purples of Sendak’s paintings, giving the story an enchanting sense of nighttime magic and possibility. Ages 4–8. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Rosa Roberts
In this Caldecott Honor Book, young readers will be transported to the end of a warm summer day. What things are being tucked in for the night? How about the sun and the sunflowers? What things are waking up with the moon? The owls, frogs, and of course the children frolicking in the nighttime activities. The children try to jump and jump higher and higher to touch the moon. However as the moon expands, it is time for the children to be tucked in their beds for the night and await the arrival of a new day. The illustrations by world-renowned Maurice Sendak are exquisite by alternating between black and white and color. New generations will discover the simplicity of life and appreciate the work of Maurice Sendak. What a welcome treat to see this picture book back in print. This re-release will certainly garner a new generation of fans. Reviewer: Rosa Roberts

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060284602
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/19/2013
Series:
Sendak Reissues Series
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
739,676
Product dimensions:
7.66(w) x 10.18(h) x 0.45(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Mrs. Udry's first book, A Tree Is Nice, illustrated by Marc Simont, won the 1957 Caldecott Award for the most distinguished American picture book. Mrs. Udry is also the author of Glenda, Let's Be Enemies (also illustrated by Maurice Sendak), Mary Ann's Mud Day, The Mean Mouse and Other Mean Stories, and Thump and Plunk.

In addition to Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak's books include Kenny's Window, Very Far Away, The Sign on Rosie's Door, Nutshell Library (consisting of Chicken Soup with Rice, Alligators All Around, One Was Johnny, and Pierre), Higglety Pigglety Pop! or There Must Be More to Life, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy, and Bumble-Ardy.

He received the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are; the 1970 Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration; the 1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, given by the American Library Association in recognition of his entire body of work; and a 1996 National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contribution to the arts in America. In 2003, he received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government.

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Moon Jumpers 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Udry's words paint a lovely picture of a sleepy ending to a warm summer's day. My two-year-old has loved this story from the first words I read to her. It's a lovely book to read aloud, and Sendak's illustrations are beautifully appropriate for each page. Not a lot of plot, but lovely imagery for anyone who has played outside on a warm summer night and had fun pretending with siblings. Makes parents reminisce for simpler times and makes children wonder about life before Nintendo.