Moon Man

Moon Man

5.0 3
by Tomi Ungerer
     
 

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Review of the first American edition of Moon Man:
"The bright, galloping illustrations are as effective as any Tomi Ungerer has done. This has some of the sting of Dr Strangelove � but tenderized, the contemporary charisma of Where the Wild Things Are: it's great! Exceptionally highly recommended."
Kirkus Reviews, 1967

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Overview


Review of the first American edition of Moon Man:
"The bright, galloping illustrations are as effective as any Tomi Ungerer has done. This has some of the sting of Dr Strangelove � but tenderized, the contemporary charisma of Where the Wild Things Are: it's great! Exceptionally highly recommended."
Kirkus Reviews, 1967

In this gently satiric fable, Ungerer pokes fun at self-important adults who are afraid of anything or anyone unfamiliar, and reminds us that there is indeed no place like home. On its first publication in the US in 1967, at the height of the Space Race, Moon Man won the Book Week prize for books for children aged 4�8, and Maurice Sendak described it in Book Week as 'Easily one of the bet picture books in recent years'�Since then, it has been translated into 12 languages. Moon Man will be the next classic Ungerer tale to be turned into a full-length feature film, following on from the success of the award-winning The Three Robbers, which was shown in French and German cinemas in 2007 and is due to be launched on DVD in the English-speaking world in Fall 2008.

Bored and lonely in his shimmering home in space, the Moon Man watches the people on Earth dancing and having a good time. Just once, he� thinks, he would like to join in the fun. So one night, he holds on to a passing comet and�crash lands�on Earth.�But the unexpected arrival�of this mysterious visitor causes statesmen, scientists and generals�to panic, and the Moon Man is thrown into jail.

Alone in his cell, the Moon Man uses his special powers to slip through the hands of the law: it turns out that in accordance with the lunar phases, the Moon Man waxes and wanes.His left side starts to disappear � the Moon Man is his�third quarter � and as the moon grows thinner and thinner, so does the Moon Man. Finally, he is able to squeeze through the bars of his window and escape. Two weeks later, and once again fully formed, he enjoys his new-found freedom on Earth, and dances happily for hours at a party where all the other guests are wearing elaborate costumes and simply think�he�has�dressed up as the Man in the Moon. But the police are on his trail, and a wild chase ensues.

Fleeing through a forest, Moon Man finds a remote castle, where he is welcomed by an ancient,�long-forgotten scientist named Doktor Bunsen van der Dunkel, who has been working on a space ship for centuries, with the aim of flying to the moon. Now too old and fat to fit into the completed rocket himself, Doktor van der Dunkel asks Moon Man to be the first passenger. Knowing that he would never be able to live on Earth in peace, Moon Man returns home to his planet, happy to stay there forever now that his curiosity has been sated. Back on Earth, Doktor van der Dunkel finally gets the recognition he deserves for his scientific breakthrough.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In Ungerer's (Crictor; Moon Man) first children's book in 25 years, a delightfully witty and lighthearted look at race relations, a cat couple is startled to discover that their newborn is a dog. (This "genetic mishap" is traced to a great-grandmother's secret marriage to a pug.) The doting parents bring up squat, jowly, wrinkly-faced Flix to climb trees and eat fried mice and pickled canaries. Under the tutelage of his basset hound godfather, the pup also learns pride in his canine heritage and masters the dog language. Flix's combined talents win him the respect of both communities, the love of a French exchange-student poodle and eventually a career in politics, in which he campaigns to end cat-dog segregation. Ungerer celebrates the versatility and perspective Flix gains from his mixed ancestry while still acknowledging the hardship of not fitting in. His lively illustrations, which feature highly expressive and individualized faces, are more supple and playful than in earlier books. The accomplished artwork brims with funny touches such as a rat-crossing sign in Cattown (speed up!) and a monument to Laika (the first dog to orbit in space) in Dogtown; more pointed details include the no-dogs-allowed sign in a posh Cattown restaurant. Ungerer's return to the field will be welcomed by all who discover this charming addition to his oeuvre, but will be especially appreciated by children growing up in more than one cultural tradition. Ages 6-10. (May) FYI: Tomi Ungerer's The Three Robbers, Moon Man and No Kiss for Mother are being reissued in paperback, as well as Heidi (by Johanna Spyri) in a hardcover edition. (Roberts Rinehart/TomCo, $6.95 40p ages 4-8 ISBN 1-57098-206-6; $6.95 40p ages 4-8 ISBN -207-4; $5.95 40p ages 6-10 ISBN -208-2; $19.95 312p all ages ISBN -162-0; May)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780714855981
Publisher:
Phaidon Press
Publication date:
05/16/2009
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
206,429
Product dimensions:
9.40(w) x 12.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

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