Moon (Jump into Science Series)

Moon (Jump into Science Series)

by Steve Tomecek, Liisa Chauncy Guida
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

A cartoon cat and bug explain scientific history and concepts regarding the Earth's moon: its ever-changing appearance, composition, comparisons to Earth and the sun, Galileo's observations and discoveries in 1609, astronauts, orbits, and other topics. Busy, colorful borders are full of decorative details based on the main pictures. A concluding craft project…  See more details below

Overview

A cartoon cat and bug explain scientific history and concepts regarding the Earth's moon: its ever-changing appearance, composition, comparisons to Earth and the sun, Galileo's observations and discoveries in 1609, astronauts, orbits, and other topics. Busy, colorful borders are full of decorative details based on the main pictures. A concluding craft project gives instructions on how to make craters.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Bright fanciful borders surround pictures of a cheerful cartoonish cat that leads young children through the countryside to consider aspects of the moon. Why does it seem to change? What sorts of beliefs about the moon are false? (It's not a planet; doesn't have water on it; isn't made of cheese; it's not as big as the sun). What happens to it in the sky? The cat observes craters on the earth, which the text compares to craters on the moon. It points out information while a helpful firefly glows near relevant parts of the illustrations. The text briefly explains why we always see the same side of the moon, the first men to land on the moon and the fact that their footsteps remain on the powdery surface, and how the orbit the moon and earth make around the sun. One experiment follows that highlights the making of craters on the moon. It asks children to drop several stones one at a time into a dish of flour and observe what happens. In a clever touch, the discussion of the questions the text raises needs to be read in a mirror—readers can't cheat and read the discussion first. This helpful and basic introduction joins the eight other "Jump into Science" books in the series and aids able young readers in handling more information on their own. 2005, National Geographic Society, Ages 4 to 8.
—Susan Hepler, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
Gr 1-2-A cartoon cat and bug explain scientific history and concepts regarding the Earth's moon: its ever-changing appearance, composition, comparisons to Earth and the sun, Galileo's observations and discoveries in 1609, astronauts, orbits, and other topics. Busy, colorful borders are full of decorative details based on the main pictures. A concluding craft project gives instructions on how to make craters. While the use of a cat as a narrator detracts from the authenticity of this title as nonfiction, the material is reliable. Some students might be confused by the explanations of the Moon's orbit and size comparisons, but, as a whole, the book will appeal to children just starting to browse the nonfiction shelves. Pair it with Seymour Simon's The Moon (S & S, 1984), as its photographs will fascinate children.-Heather Ver Voort, Washington West Elementary, Olean, NY Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The latest in the Jump Into Science series is another thumbs up for the author as well as for future space walkers. Tomecek explains the major misconceptions and confusing actions of our moon in easy-to-understand language coupled with an adorable cat and lightning bug that illustrate the concepts. What is the moon made of? What causes the "man in the moon" illusion? Why does the moon seem to change shape? The answers to these questions will change the way young readers gaze up at the sky, and make them want to leave their footprints on the moon just as Neil Armstrong did back in 1969. A follow-up activity will have experimenters dropping differently sized pebbles into a pan of flour to model the way that craters form the dark spots we see on the moon's surface. The vibrantly colored illustrations are simply detailed in order to focus the reader's attention. A great in-depth look at how the moon's features formed and a starting place to understanding the changing shape of the moon. (Nonfiction. 5-9)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780792251231
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
04/28/2005
Series:
Jump into Science Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
11.20(w) x 9.18(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Steve Tomecek is the Executive Director and founder of Science Plus, Inc. He is the author of numerous Jump Into Science® books as well as several other titles, including the winner of the 1996 American Institute of Physics Excellence in Science Writing Award. He lives in Bellerose, New York.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >