Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything

( 248 )

Overview

The blockbuster phenomenon that charts an amazing journey of the mind while revolutionizing our concept of memory

An instant bestseller that is poised to become a classic, Moonwalking with Einstein recounts Joshua Foer's yearlong quest to improve his memory under the tutelage of top "mental athletes." He draws on cutting-edge research, a surprising cultural history of remembering, and venerable tricks of the mentalist's trade to transform our understanding of human memory. From ...

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Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything

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Overview

The blockbuster phenomenon that charts an amazing journey of the mind while revolutionizing our concept of memory

An instant bestseller that is poised to become a classic, Moonwalking with Einstein recounts Joshua Foer's yearlong quest to improve his memory under the tutelage of top "mental athletes." He draws on cutting-edge research, a surprising cultural history of remembering, and venerable tricks of the mentalist's trade to transform our understanding of human memory. From the United States Memory Championship to deep within the author's own mind, this is an electrifying work of journalism that reminds us that, in every way that matters, we are the sum of our memories.

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Editorial Reviews

Michiko Kakutani
In his captivating new book, Moonwalking With Einstein, the young journalist Joshua Foer tackles the subject of memory the way George Plimpton tackled pro football and boxing…Mr. Foer writes in these pages with fresh enthusiasm. His narrative is smart and funny and, like the work of Dr. Oliver Sacks, it's informed by a humanism that enables its author to place the mysteries of the brain within a larger philosophical and cultural context.
—The New York Times
Alexandra Horowitz
…[Foer's] assemblage of personal mnemonic images is riotous. He makes suspenseful an event animated mostly by the participants' "dramatic temple massaging."
—The New York Times Book Review
Kirkus Reviews

In his first book, freelance journalist Foer recounts his adventures in preparing for the U.S. Memory Championship, investigating both the nature of memory and why the act of memorization still matters.

For much of human history, remembering was the key to retaining accumulated knowledge and wisdom. The invention of printing sparked the development of "externalized memory," which has been greatly accelerated by computers and the Internet. We need no longer remember everything, but rather know where to find it, relegating memory experts to a "quirky subculture" comprised of individuals able to remember a list of 1,000 numbers, the exact order of two decks of playing cards and other feats. Foer began to investigate this subculture and then joined it as he trained for a year to compete among other "mental athletes." Mental athletes are neither geniuses nor savants, but they have mastered the art of translating what the brain is not good at remembering—words and numbers—into what it is good at remembering—space and images. They employ the 2,500-year-old mnemonic device of constructing "memory palaces"—imaginary buildings with distinct images throughout these spaces. For example, an image of President Clinton smoking a cigar on the couch might be the number three. It becomes, of course, quite complex, but Foer emphasizes that memorization is neither a gift nor a trick; it is hard work developing "a degree of attention and mindfulness normally lacking." The author is as concerned with what memory means as he is with learning how to memorize. He offers fascinating and accessible explorations into the workings of the brain and tells the story of a man who could forget nothing and of another man who could only remember his most immediate thought. If "experience is the sum of our memories and wisdom the sum of experience," writes the author, what does it mean that "we've supplanted our own natural memory with a vast superstructure of technological crutches"?

An original, entertaining exploration about how and why we remember.

The Barnes & Noble Review

In this wise, witty, and fairly memorable book, science writer Joshua Foer -- brother of both former New Republic editor Franklin and wunderkind novelist Jonathan Safran -- cuts his own writerly teeth on a mysterious, dense, and occasionally spongy subject: the workings of human memory. Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything isn't, however, just a book about science, or about abstract practices of remembering, it's also Foer's quasi-memoir about the year he became, by an odd string of events, the winner of the U.S. Memory Championship. Even while Foer relates a great deal about the history, cultural relevance, and new science of recall, he takes himself as his own subject, setting out to see what he can learn by trying to improve his own memory. On the journey, he visits things as diverse as card memorization, Renaissance literature, and chicken sexing, as well as the wacky circuit of competitive memory trainers, who spend large portions of their days training themselves to memorize elaborate strings of binary numbers at lightning speed.

All of this emerged, it seems, from a moment of unconscious whimsy. One day in 2005, Foer, recently graduated from college and traveling to write a freelance article, stopped by the Weightlifting Hall of Fame. After seeing pictures of the world's strongest man, he began to wonder about the world's smartest. Smartness is of course relative, but some Internet searching uncovered people who held the world championships in memory -- who had performed elaborate feats such as memorizing decks of cards in under four minutes, or reciting pi out to its farthest decimal. The idea of the memory champion standing in as a proxy for human smartness intrigued him. Following his hunch with an article, Foer met a cocksure Brit named Ed, a ranking "grandmaster of memory," who promised to teach him to improve his memory so that he, Foer, could win such a title. Foer was intrigued and drawn in. For the rest of the book, Foer follows a world that runs parallel to, but is not the same thing as, remembering: the geeky subculture of people who train for and compete in memory competitions.

The book that emerges traces a highly unusual journey reflecting what Foer learns about memory, about memory training, and about himself. The first two subjects are ultimately the most fascinating -- so engrossing they make the book hard to put down. In attempting to remember more, Foer delves into a seemingly forgotten aspect of the ancient world: the fact that in the time before computers and iPhones, but really before, say, even the mass printing of that seemingly-endangered technology called the book, if you wanted to learn something you had to memorize it.

Accordingly, ancient learning was memorizing, and learning was also learning how to memorize. Foer is at his richest when he's uncovering now-lost medieval memory techniques and linking them to the ways we now understand that the fibers of memory work today. Foer explores a new-to-us but common-to-the-ancients technique called the Memory Palace, where, to master lists, one deposits items along them in a spatial pattern with which one is familiar: i.e., to remember your to-do list imagine its items strewn in a familiar path along your route to work. (Apparently our spatial memories are richer and stronger than our other forms of remembering). Foer notes how older memory techniques rely on expanding the network of associations in which the memory is placed, and then developing those networks so that large strings of memory can lodge in them. This can allow, perhaps quite literally, for mind-expansion: Foer muses enticingly about how memory, or increased memory, might be linked to things as seemingly discrete as both mindfulness and expertise -- how the very fabric of being able to remember better has the capacity to enlarge both our perception and our experience of the world.

Here's the thing: this wonderful, rich, philosophical, well-written premise devolves over its 277 pages into an account of Foer spending long hours to learn what essentially amount to a couple of tricky stunts -- being able to recite the order of a deck of cards in the fastest possible time, or retain arcane bits of knowledge more effectively over the course of a competition which has him regurgitate them. By the end, even Foer seems tired: upon winning the U.S. memory competition, his first emotion "was not happiness or relief or self-congratulation." It was, he discovers, "simply exhaustion." And what seemed promising about being able to remember more -- that it might lead one to a space of expertise, or a more richly textured life -- these payoffs seem not to emerge in Foer's meditation on his post-championship haze, which mostly consists of getting wasted with his new British friends.

If, in the end, the book has less payoff than it might, it's still both humorous and intriguing. One finds oneself thinking of the memory palace, that artificial mental structure by which a mind could be furnished with perhaps unlimited marvels. We live in an era when some of us forget even our own phone numbers. But the mind is a bigger thing than any of us realize, and Foer reminds us to keep exploring it.

--Tess Taylor

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780143120537
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 2/28/2012
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 49,964
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Joshua Foer

Joshua Foer was born in Washington, DC in 1982 and lives in New Haven, CT with his wife Dinah. His writing has appeared in National Geographic, Esquire, Slate, Outside, the New York Times, and other publications. He is the co-founder of the Atlas Obscura, an online guide to the world’s wonders and curiosities. He is also the co-founder of the architectural design competition, Sukkah City. Moonwalking with Einstein is his first book.

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Table of Contents

One The Smartest Man is Hard to Find 3

Two The Man Who Remembered Too Much

Three The Expert Expert 49

Four The Most Forgetful Man in the World 69

Five The Memory Palace 89

Eight The Ok Plateau 163

Nine The Talented Tenth 187

Ten The Little Rain Man in All Of US 211

Eleven The USA Memory Championship 237

Epilogue 259

Acknowledgments 273

Notes 275

Bibliography 289

Index 299

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Interviews & Essays

An Interview with Joshua Foer author of MOONWALKING WITH EINSTEIN: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything To be published by The Penguin Press on March 7, 2011


First, can you explain the title of you book, MOONWALKING WITH EINSTEIN?

The title refers to a memory device I used in the US Memory Championship—specifically it's a mnemonic that helped me memorize a deck of playing cards. Moonwalking with Einstein works as a mnemonic because it's such a goofy image. Things that are weird or colorful are the most memorable. If you try to picture Albert Einstein sliding backwards across a dance floor wearing penny loafers and a diamond glove, that's pretty much unforgettable.


What are the U.S. Memory Championships? How did you become involved?

The U.S. Memory Championship is a rather bizarre contest held each spring in New York City, in which people get together to see who can remember the most names of strangers, the most lines of poetry, the most random digits. I went to the event as a science journalist, to cover what I assumed would be the Super Bowl of savants. But when I talked to the competitors, they told me something really interesting. They weren't savants. And they didn't have photographic memories. Rather, they'd trained their memories using ancient techniques. They said anyone could do it. I was skeptical. Frankly, I didn't believe them. I said, well, if anyone can do it, could you teach me? A guy named Ed Cooke, who has one of the best trained memories in the world, took me under his wing and taught me everything he knew about memory techniques. A year later I came back to the contest, this time to try and compete, as a sort of exercise in participatory journalism. I was curious simply to see how well I'd do, but I ended up winning the contest. That really wasn't supposed to happen.


What was the most surprising thing you found out about yourself competing in the Memory Championships?

In the process of studying these techniques, I learned something remarkable: that there's far more potential in our minds than we often give them credit for. I'm not just talking about the fact that it's possible to memorize lots of information using memory techniques. I'm talking about a lesson that is more general, and in a way much bigger: that it's possible, with training and hard work, to teach oneself to do something that might seem really difficult.


Can you explain the “OK Plateau”?

The OK Plateau is that place we all get to where we just stop getting better at something. Take typing, for example. You might type and type and type all day long, but once you reach a certain level, you just never get appreciably faster at it. That's because it's become automatic. You've moved it to the back of your mind's filing cabinet. If you want to become a faster typer, it's possible, of course. But you've got to bring the task back under your conscious control. You've got to push yourself past where you're comfortable. You have to watch yourself fail and learn from your mistakes. That's the way to get better at anything. And it's how I improved my memory.


What do you mean by saying there an “art” to memory?

The “art of memory” refers to a set of techniques that were invented in ancient Greece. These are the same techniques that Cicero used to memorize his speeches, and that medieval scholars used to memorize entire books. The “art” is in creating imagery in your mind that is so unusual, so colorful, so unlike anything you've ever seen before that it's unlikely to be forgotten. That's why mnemonists like to say that their skills are as much about creativity as memory.


How do you think technology has affected how and what we remember?

Once upon a time people invested in their memories, they cultivated them. They studiously furnished their minds. They remembered. Today, of course, we've got books, and computers and smart phones to hold our memories for us. We've outsourced our memories to external devices. The result is that we no longer trust our memories. We see every small forgotten thing as evidence that they're failing us altogether. We've forgotten how to remember.


What is the connection between memory and our sense of time?

As we get older, life seems to fly by faster and faster. That's because we structure our experience of time around memories. We remember events in relation to other events. But as we get older, and our experiences become less unique, our memories can blend together. If yesterday's lunch is indistinguishable from the one you ate the day before, it'll end up being forgotten. That's why it's so hard to remember meals. In the same way, if you're not doing things that are unique and different and memorable, this year can come to resemble the last, and end up being just as forgettable as yesterday's lunch. That's why it's so important to pack your life with interesting experiences that make your life memorable, and provide a texture to the passage of time.


How is your memory now?

Ironically, not much better than when I started this whole journey. The techniques I learned, and used in the memory contest, are great for remembering structured information like shopping lists or phone numbers, but they don't improve any sort of underlying, generalizable memory ability. Unfortunately, I still misplace my car keys.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 248 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 249 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Personal and Informative

    "Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything" by Joshua Foer is a memoir of the author's attempted to win the U.S. memory championship. Along the way Mr. Foer attempts to explain some tricks, techniques and the science around memory.

    The book follows the gripping journey taken by Joshua Foer as he participates in the U.S. Memory Championship. As a science journalist Foer becomes interested in the champions' secrets as well as the secrets of the brain which we still do not fully understand.

    Foer learns how to naturally memorize information with the help of experts and to master techniques which make memorization easier.

    "Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything" by Joshua Foer is a fabulous memoir which is not only personal and informative, but also highly entertaining.

    As a journalist, Mr. Foer became interested in those "mental athletes" who can memorize random data (order of packs of cards, long lists, etc.) when he covered the U.S. Memory Championship as an assignment. As he researched more into this area he became intrigued and wondered if he could do it also.

    At the start of his research, Mr. Foer went to meet psychologist Anders Ericsson who studies those with exceptional memory. "SF" can remember 80 digits after a single hearing, for example. During Foer's attempt, Ericsson would study him - a man without an exceptional memory. However, in a very poignant part of the book he also meets with a man who completely lost his short term memory.

    Over the next year Foer studied hard to improve his memory, or rather improve memorizing random stuff (there is a difference as we find out). The path we find ourselves going along with Mr. Foer on his journey is delightful, inventing and funny, the people he meets are interesting and quirky.

    Experiment:
    Is the human mind really susceptible to the clever tricks Mr. Foer describes in his book?
    I attempted to find out.

    One of the memorization techniques involves a "memory palace" and is supposedly a very old method. The technique involves imagining yourself walking around a familiar building and placing objects on a list in that building (your home, first grad class, grandma's home, etc.).
    Supposedly if you walk your way through that "memory palace" again you should be able to retrieve those items without an issue.

    On pages 92-93 Mr. Foer describes his first memorization list given to him in Central Park by English memory champion Ed Cooke (Pickled garlic, Cottage cheese, salmon, six bottles of white wine, socks, three hula hoops, snorkel, dry ice machine, email Sophia, etc.)

    As I walked though my home, in my mind, I placed all fifteen items around my house (using quirky stories such as having three Hawaiian dancers perform with hula hoops on my son's train table) and, believe it or not, it worked.
    It amazed me so much I came home and asked my wife to do the same thing.

    Guess what?
    She did and she was amazed as well. Over the next several days we challenged one another, in random places, to name the list.

    As it turned out, learning memorization was a part of every school curriculum in the early years of the country - however, from some reason, it has been abandoned.
    That's too bad.

    39 out of 43 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 3, 2011

    Fascinating read that really works

    I found this book to be an intelligent read and the best part is that his memory strategies ACTUALLY work. I used his tips to memorize a huge list of items and a week later I remember them all. This book is definitely worth a closer look!

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 25, 2011

    buy it!!!!!

    i couldnt put this book down. read it cover to cover and couldnt have enjoyed it more. ive used some of the tricks and they work well.

    7 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 8, 2012

    After working with publicly available Memory systems and doing m

    After working with publicly available Memory systems and doing my own research for over 20 years it is refreshing to see validation that I was on the right track. The level of humor was appropriate as well for a subject that could definitely use it. Made me laugh out loud on more than one occasion.

    The book was everything it was described to be and then some and gave a brilliant history on the subject, sorely missing by all predecessor tomes on the Art & Science of memory systems.

    I look forward to further tangible advancements in learning systems for society as a whole. This book gives a very good dissertation on how the hope is still alive. Now the fun will begin for usable memory systems I'm sure :)

    Congrats Josh

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Fun read, reveals much about the brain.

    Being someone who has an awful memory, I was drawn to the subject matter. Its was interesting to find out that literate people from the Greeks to the Middle Ages could memorize entire texts, sometimes backwards and that you and even me can learn the techniques to do so. This is no self-help book though and not written as such. However, we often forget how much our brains can do with all the technology that we rely on. I've already memorized a poem using the memory palace idea from the book. (Ode on a Grecian Urn) Its not the best writing but it doesn't get dull.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 16, 2012

    Great Book

    Great book. The subject was fascinating however the writing at times was poor. Not the next great American work of non-fiction so no big deal. I would order it again just not from B&N. For a shipment that was supposed to take three days took almost three weeks. B&N did resend the product but did not rush the replacement shipment or offer to refund the whole or part of the order. Amazon would have (I know from past experience) so I will be ordering from Amazon in the future.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    An enjoyable read about our memory!

    It was an easy and enjoyable read that covered the history of memory, memory tricks and specific interesting minds in our world today. The author even visits with the famous "Rainman" character portrayed by Dustin Hoffman. A must read. After reading it, I bought a copy for my dad.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 3, 2011

    Enjoyable

    Wanted to read this book for quite some time. Once i got started i couldnt put the book down. Some of the beliefs and assumptions i had about memory and how one remembers haas been dispelled. The style of writing is veryfluid and enjoyable and at the same time the author has given some glimpses of memory tecniques that i cant wait to try and devlop.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    I remembered Where I Parked.

    I pass it along so other can enjoy and learn fro, book that I have purchased.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Good Read

    excellent

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 1, 2011

    good way to get an overview of the subject

    personal story of a journalists journey in researching the subject of memory. Good information on some techniques that encouraged me to try myself. NOT a book trying to sell someones system. worth buying.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2014

    S Memorable read

    I will always remember the pickled garlic at the end of the driveway. Really fun read.

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  • Posted December 20, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Moonwalking with Einstein is a great book. I would love to compe

    Moonwalking with Einstein is a great book. I would love to compete in the World Memory Championship. I like how the author explained how we remember that someone is a baker better that that thier last name is Baker. I highly recommend this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2013

    Great book

    Great book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2013

    Although others would disagree...

    I know that I enjoyed this book much more than others. I love books like this because not only does it tell a story, but it also leads you through other paths throughout. Sometimes the writer did get sidetracked along the way and the story became somewhat random, but it all came together in the end. I recommend this book for ages 14 and up.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2013

    Yuna

    Look up yuna final fantasy-x2

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2013

    Urgent Messgae

    Rainbow daeh is locked out of res three.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2013

    Rin and Len Kagamine

    Just search them up. They're vocaloids along with Hatsune Miku. REVOLUTION

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2013

    Rainbow Dash bio

    Do i really need to? Just Google 'rainbow dash mlp' and click on the link that leads you to my personal page on the My Little Pony Wikia! (Its not really MY page its Rainbow Dash's but you know what i mean.)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2013

    Sari

    Female. Teenager 16 years old. Techno-Organic. Weapons and Equipment: energy-based roller-blades tonfa-like energy blades and an energy-based sledgehammer. (Gave myself an upgrade when I was 8) Her new form also greatly strengthens and increases her natural abilities to superhuman levels, allowing her to make full use and proficiency of Prowl's Cybertronian martial arts training. In this robotic armoreed/cybernetic form, she is shown to be extreamely fast, speedy, agaile, nimble, durable, strong and powerful. My white-colored energy orbs are much, much larger-being the size of beach balls- and can now cause much more substantial damage and destruction. Also have the ability to scan any electronic machine and determine what is wrong with them and how to fix the problem in seconds through physical contact with it. Bright blue eyes. Red hair in pigtails. But the pigtails are small. She has bansc that come dow to her face on the sides alittle. She wears a dress that has orange on both sides and a yellow stripe that goes down in the middle.she has orange and yellow shoes. Also yellow socks that go all of the way up pass her knees. She is an intelligent girl with s mischievous streak but she also has a kind heart. She cares about her father who works really hard. She has a fit when things do not go her way. She protects the ones that who she loves or are friends. She has a bike and she uses her key to transform into a flight pack. She has a Key that can heal bots or give them upgrades. And thats it.

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