The Moorchild

( 25 )

Overview

Half moorfolk and half human, and unable to shape-shift or disappear at will, Moql threatens the safety of the Band. So the Folk banish her and send her to live among humans as a changeling. Named Saaski by the couple for whose real baby she was swapped, she grows up taunted and feared by the villagers for being different, and is comfortable only on the moor, playing strange music on her bagpipes.

As Saaski grows up, memories from her forgotten past with the Folks slowly emerge....

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The Moorchild

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Overview

Half moorfolk and half human, and unable to shape-shift or disappear at will, Moql threatens the safety of the Band. So the Folk banish her and send her to live among humans as a changeling. Named Saaski by the couple for whose real baby she was swapped, she grows up taunted and feared by the villagers for being different, and is comfortable only on the moor, playing strange music on her bagpipes.

As Saaski grows up, memories from her forgotten past with the Folks slowly emerge. But so do emotions from her human side, and she begins to realize the terrible wrong the Folk have done to the humans she calls Da and Mumma. She is determined to restore their child to them, even if it means a dangerous return to the world that has already rejected her once.

Feeling that she is neither fully human nor "Folk," a changeling learns her true identity and attempts to find the human child whose place she had been given.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A magical find."

School Library Journal, starred review

"An unusual and absorbing story...an excellent choice to read aloud."

Booklist, starred review

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A girl who is half-fairy and half-human must come to terms with her origins in this fantasy tale, a Newbery Honor book. "Transcending genre, these themes will likely resonate with a wide audience," said PW. Ages 9-12. Apr.
Children's Literature - Dr. Judy Rowen
Saaski is an unusual child, with dark skin and wild, light hair like the tuft of a thistle. The other children jeer at her, calling her "freaky-odd." Her grandmother, Old Bess, is the first to realize that she is a changeling, left by the Moorfolk in exchange for a human child stolen from its cradle. Eventually, Saaski comes to understand that she doesn't belong, either in the human world or in the Mound inhabited by the Folk. With the help of Tam, an orphan boy, she decides to set things right. An inventive tale with an evocative setting, the story clearly conveys the pain of being an outcast, on the fringes of accepted society.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-This well-written novel incorporates elements of folklore into an examination of society's response to those who are perceived as different. The plot centers on the experiences of Saaski, a changeling who was cast out by the "Folk" because of her human father. While she does not initially recall her past life, persecution by the villagers eventually rekindles her memories and fires her resolve to rescue the human child for whom she was exchanged. Aided in her quest by Tam, an orphan who accepts her oddness and cherishes her friendship, Saaski is ultimately successful and thus repays the kindness of her "foster" family by returning their daughter to them. Some readers may find Saaski's cruel treatment by the villagers upsetting and her future with Tam unsettlingly vague, but both are consistent with McGraw's clear intention of using her novel to expose peoples' prejudices and emphasize the importance of being true to oneself. While this unusual blend of fantasy and contemporary concerns may not find a wide audience, the quality of McGraw's writing ensures that for those, like Tam, who can appreciate the unusual, The Moorchild will truly be a magical find.-Lisa Dennis, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Kirkus Reviews
Moql's father is human and her mother one of the Moorfolk, who live beneath the moor. Moql belongs to neither world, but her human blood, which prevents her from changing shape or disappearing at will, makes her dangerous to the Folk. An exchange is made; they have a human child to train as a slave and Moql becomes Saaski, a village child unaware of her origins. As a changeling in the human world, Saaski is regarded as a freak. The concepts of hate and love initially elude her—the Folk are essentially amoral—but she learns about one at the hands of vigilantes and about the other when she makes peace with herself and returns her new mother's love with the perfect gift.

A complex and finely drawn character, Saaski undergoes a gradual awakening to her true nature that readers will find intriguing and poignant. McGraw (Tangled Webb, 1993, etc.) makes of Saaski's struggles an emotionally satisfying story; the moor, where Saaski's two lives intersect, is an especially evocative setting.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416927686
  • Publisher: Aladdin
  • Publication date: 12/26/2006
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 256,050
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 940L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.66 (w) x 10.62 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Introduction

About the Book

One of the most acclaimed fantasies in recent years — winner of a Newbery Honor Medal and chosen as a Boston Globe Horn Book Honor Book for fiction — The Moorchild is set long ago in an unfamiliar place where fairy folk and humans sometimes intermingle. Yet at its heart, this distinguished novel is about the timeless issues of fear and prejudice. Half-folk and half-human, Saaski has no place in either world. The human villagers ridicule and taunt her because she's different. They blame her for a pox that's plaguing their children and for the death of their cattle. Her life is threatened. But Saaski has no desire to hurt others. She is searching for the truth about herself and for some place where she can finally fit in. An "unusual blend of fantasy and contemporary concerns," School Library Journal wrote in its starred review, "The Moorchild will truly be a magical find."

Discussion Topics

  • The Moorchild is dedicated to "all children who have ever felt DIFFERENT." Is this another way of saying that the book is dedicated to all children? Do you think every child — or adult — has felt different at some point in their lives? Have you?
  • Discuss Saaski's friendship with Tam. Why is each so important to the other? How are they alike? How are they different? How long do you think they will keep traveling together?
  • Almost as soon as she sees Saaski, Old Bess is convinced that the child is not human. What is her evidence? Why won't Yanno and Anwara believe what she says about the baby? What do they fear will happen to the baby if she's right? What do they fear will happen to them?Are their fears justified?
  • The villagers mistreat Saaski because she is different from them. Are there people in your own community who are rejected because they are different? Who are they? How are they mistreated? Are there local individuals or groups devoted to supporting them? How can you lend a hand?
  • Because she is half-Folk, Saaski doesn't understand human emotions like hate or love. She asks her friend Tam to explain them to her. How does he define them? Do you agree with his definition?
  • Disobeying the orders of her human guardians, Saaski returns again and again to the Moors. Why does she feel so at ease there? Where do you feet the most comfortable? Why?
  • Saaski takes enormous risks to return a stolen human baby back to her real parents. Why is this so important to her? Why is she so upset by the name that the fairy folk give to this human child?
  • Back when Saaski lived in the Folk Mound, she lived "a life without yesterdays or tomorrows — life as it was meant to be." Or so she thought, before she lived among humans. What does "a life without yesterdays or tomorrows" mean to you? Is it an appealing idea? Is it scary? Why?
  • Saaski is part of two worlds — the human and the Folk. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each world. Which would you rather live in, Why?

Activities and Research

  • Saaski's long lost memories of her early life with the Folk come rushing back when she talks to one of her childhood friends from the Folk Mound. Jog your own memories. After looking through old photographs, listening to music you used to enjoy, or talking to a family member or friend you haven't seen for a long time, write about a long ago experience in your own life that you had almost completely forgotten.
  • Although Old Bess tries to convince them otherwise, the villagers believe that Saaski has made their children sick. Even now, myths and superstitions still surround many illnesses. Invite a health professional into your classroom to discuss how she or he fights fears or outdated beliefs that can do harm to their patients.
  • Changelings — babies who are taken from their true parents and transformed — often appear in fairy tales and folk tales. On your own or with the help of your teacher or librarian, search for other tales about changelings. Compare those stories with The Moorchild. How is Saaski like the other changelings you discover? How is she different?
  • Depending upon who is doing the looking, the Folk Mound is either beautiful or shabby. Draw a picture on your own — or create a diorama with a group — that depicts both views of the Folk Mound.
  • When Saaski discovers a set of bagpipes, she plays this famously difficult instrument so expertly that Yanno fears her musical gift might come from a fiendish source. Search for recorded versions of bagpipe music. If possible, invite an accomplished bagpipe player into your classroom to perform some pieces and discuss the instrument.
  • The Moorchild is sprinkled with unusual words and phrases such as "argle-bargle," "cozen," and "conventical." As you're reading the book, keep a list of them. Which can you find in a good dictionary? Which do you believe the author invented herself? How would you define them?

About the Author

Eloise McGraw began writing at the age of eight, and except for a ten-year period when she became absorbed in painting and drawing, she has never stopped for long since. McGraw's first book, Sawdust In His Shoes, was published in 1950. Her twentieth book for young people, The Moorchild, is a 1996 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Honor Book for fiction and a 1997 Newbery Honor Book. Eloise received the 1996 C.E.S. Wood award for Lifetime Achievement.

She and her husband, William Corbin McGraw, also an author of children's books, live in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

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Reading Group Guide


About the Book

One of the most acclaimed fantasies in recent years -- winner of a Newbery Honor Medal and chosen as a Boston Globe Horn Book Honor Book for fiction -- The Moorchild is set long ago in an unfamiliar place where fairy folk and humans sometimes intermingle. Yet at its heart, this distinguished novel is about the timeless issues of fear and prejudice. Half-folk and half-human, Saaski has no place in either world. The human villagers ridicule and taunt her because she's different. They blame her for a pox that's plaguing their children and for the death of their cattle. Her life is threatened. But Saaski has no desire to hurt others. She is searching for the truth about herself and for some place where she can finally fit in. An "unusual blend of fantasy and contemporary concerns," School Library Journal wrote in its starred review, "The Moorchild will truly be a magical find."

Discussion Topics

  • The Moorchild is dedicated to "all children who have ever felt DIFFERENT." Is this another way of saying that the book is dedicated to all children? Do you think every child -- or adult -- has felt different at some point in their lives? Have you?
  • Discuss Saaski's friendship with Tam. Why is each so important to the other? How are they alike? How are they different? How long do you think they will keep traveling together?
  • Almost as soon as she sees Saaski, Old Bess is convinced that the child is not human. What is her evidence? Why won't Yanno and Anwara believe what she says about the baby? What do they fear will happen to the baby if she's right? What do they fear will happen to them? Are their fears justified?
  • The villagers mistreat Saaski because she is different from them. Are there people in your own community who are rejected because they are different? Who are they? How are they mistreated? Are there local individuals or groups devoted to supporting them? How can you lend a hand?
  • Because she is half-Folk, Saaski doesn't understand human emotions like hate or love. She asks her friend Tam to explain them to her. How does he define them? Do you agree with his definition?
  • Disobeying the orders of her human guardians, Saaski returns again and again to the Moors. Why does she feel so at ease there? Where do you feet the most comfortable? Why?
  • Saaski takes enormous risks to return a stolen human baby back to her real parents. Why is this so important to her? Why is she so upset by the name that the fairy folk give to this human child?
  • Back when Saaski lived in the Folk Mound, she lived "a life without yesterdays or tomorrows -- life as it was meant to be." Or so she thought, before she lived among humans. What does "a life without yesterdays or tomorrows" mean to you? Is it an appealing idea? Is it scary? Why?
  • Saaski is part of two worlds -- the human and the Folk. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each world. Which would you rather live in, Why?

Activities and Research

  • Saaski's long lost memories of her early life with the Folk come rushing back when she talks to one of her childhood friends from the Folk Mound. Jog your own memories. After looking through old photographs, listening to music you used to enjoy, or talking to a family member or friend you haven't seen for a long time, write about a long ago experience in your own life that you had almost completely forgotten.
  • Although Old Bess tries to convince them otherwise, the villagers believe that Saaski has made their children sick. Even now, myths and superstitions still surround many illnesses. Invite a health professional into your classroom to discuss how she or he fights fears or outdated beliefs that can do harm to their patients.
  • Changelings -- babies who are taken from their true parents and transformed -- often appear in fairy tales and folk tales. On your own or with the help of your teacher or librarian, search for other tales about changelings. Compare those stories with The Moorchild. How is Saaski like the other changelings you discover? How is she different?
  • Depending upon who is doing the looking, the Folk Mound is either beautiful or shabby. Draw a picture on your own -- or create a diorama with a group -- that depicts both views of the Folk Mound.
  • When Saaski discovers a set of bagpipes, she plays this famously difficult instrument so expertly that Yanno fears her musical gift might come from a fiendish source. Search for recorded versions of bagpipe music. If possible, invite an accomplished bagpipe player into your classroom to perform some pieces and discuss the instrument.
  • The Moorchild is sprinkled with unusual words and phrases such as "argle-bargle," "cozen," and "conventical." As you're reading the book, keep a list of them. Which can you find in a good dictionary? Which do you believe the author invented herself? How would you define them?

About the Author

Eloise McGraw began writing at the age of eight, and except for a ten-year period when she became absorbed in painting and drawing, she has never stopped for long since. McGraw's first book, Sawdust In His Shoes, was published in 1950. Her twentieth book for young people, The Moorchild, is a 1996 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Honor Book for fiction and a 1997 Newbery Honor Book. Eloise received the 1996 C.E.S. Wood award for Lifetime Achievement.

She and her husband, William Corbin McGraw, also an author of children's books, live in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 25 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(17)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 25 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2004

    The Moorchild

    This is one of me and my sister's favorite books. The Moorchild was one of the first books I ever read that introduced me to fantasy like this, and I fell in love with it. It is well written, and it gives you a sense that you are in the book. It gave me glimpses into a beautiful world, and I thank the author for that chance.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2002

    A Great Book for All!

    The Moorchild is one of my favorite books for a variety of reasons. One thing I loved about the book was Saaski's willingness to help another, although no one would help her. In the end of the book, Saaski doesn't care about her needs or wants, but about what would make her mother happy. Saaski knows that she is not the little girl that her mother wanted, and Saaski stops at nothing to get that other little girl back. This is a classic example of self sacrifice. Saaski could have just up and left her mother and father but she choose to replace what they had lost: a normal little girl who loved them and who they loved back. But all along there was something Saaski didn't realize. She didn't realize that her parents loved her. Although Saaski was not what they expected, her parents always loved her. And by bringing back their other child, Saaski showed how much she loved mother and father in return.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2002

    A Book for All Time

    The Moorchild, by Eloise McGraw is a very intense story about a little girl who doesnt quite fit in anywhere. This story is so engaging not only because of Saaski, but also because Ms. McGraw has entwined Scottish folklore into it. The cultural backround combined with the fantasy makes this one of the most enriching books I've ever read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2001

    My favorite book!

    I love this book! I read it for the first time a few years ago and have read it many times since! I love the fact that someone has finally realized that the Changling herself might have an opinion on the matter of being 'changed', and that she doesn't have to be evil! This is a must read for anyone who likes fantasy. Or, as the author puts it so terrifically, 'To anyone who ever felt different.'

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 11, 2012

    Fantastic MG Novel

    The Moorchild was one of my favorite books when I was younger. It is a beautifully told story about a young girl that doesn't fit in anywhere. The Folk people give her up because she is half human, and the humans are suspicious of her because she is different. The villagers' dislike of Moql (Saaski) becomes stronger as the story progresses and as she learns more about where she came from.

    I think that most children can relate to Saaski. At some point in almost everyone's life, they feel left out, excluded, or different from everyone else. Saaski is a fantastic heroine. She is complex, intelligent and brave. She develops a wonderful sense of self-awareness throughout the book, and comes to love herself for who she is.

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  • Posted November 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    thumbs up

    this book is a very gental slow paced book. For me it was calming to read. I thought it was very well writen as well. I definetly enjoyed the book alot. Its not the coolest book in the world to most people, but my I loved it myself.

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  • Posted August 27, 2009

    Adorable Book

    I found this gem in a resale shop, and loved it. It is a great book for those who have the sense of wonder as a child does. It is a book about being different from all others and wondering where one truly belongs, yet making the best of it.

    A good book for young readers.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2009

    This book is horrible(in my opinon)

    My english teacher assignedd us to read this book. I find it very confusing to read but yet brings up good vocab. Its ok if you like a challenge. For me I hate challnges. So guess what I dislike this book!
    Read my review on the last olympian by Rick Riordan(great at writing books one of my fav authors!!) THE END!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2006

    A Very Different Sort of Tale

    The Moorchild is one of the few books which I have read that have not had the ending you think it will. But don't let that chase you away, because it is a wonderfully written book about the idea of accepting yourself as you are even if you live in a world you aren't truly a part of. The ending is different, but you know it is how it should be. Read it and you won't regret it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2005

    Great Great Great

    I liked this book so much! It took me forever to get started on it though, since, for me, the beginning is kind of confusing. I definitly recommend this book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2002

    The Moorchild

    The Moorchild takes place in the Scottish Moor. Saaski the main character of the book is a changeling who has been outcast by the Folk community, because she is half human and half Folk. She is preceived by everyone as being different and she has to cope with physical pain and torment throughout the novel. Saaski will take you on an adventure through self discovery and her many experiences at trying to fit in along with bringing her human mother the gift she wants. The book will encourage readers to learn that it is good to be accepting of those who are different. The storyline has many magical elements to it such as; medieval folk, elves, and invented vocabulary. The magic will make the reader curious with excitement and not want to put the book down. The Moorchild can be meaningful to anyone who reads it including those who are different and those who have not yet learned to be accepting. Students in grades four through six will find this book enjoyable especially if you are one of those people who feels different and unaccepted. Teachers may want to use this book in a literature circle or for students to use as a personal book report. The Moorchild is a wonderful story that will capture the audience and make the reader appreciate the unusual.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2002

    Notes on 'The Moorchild'

    I loved this book. I have read it twice, my father read and loved it, and I got my sister reading it. I could really relate to Moql'nkkn, being an outsider myself. This book really made me feel good, knowing that I'm not the only one with 'social problems' and Saaski was a perfect example of a kid who just doesn't fit in, and her story is mingled with ancient folk tales from the Celtic people.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2002

    This is a GREAT book for pre-teens to the age 99999!

    This was the first book i read by Eloise McGraw and I thought it was great!!!!!! Worth reading if you injoy fansteys!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2001

    GREAT BOOK!

    One of my very favorite books! I recommend it for kids 10-14

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2001

    More than a children's book...

    I love books, more than anything else in the world. I've read most of the books in my local library, but not very many of the children's section. So one day, when I was wandering around the Elementary part of the library, I discovered this book and immediately fell in love with it! It is outstanding! If I were in charge, I'd place it on a shelf that any reader of any age could go to. This book is good for children to read, but is good for those of us in the older generation to read as well. It leads your mind to places never explored, and gives it new ideas to 'digest'. It introduces you to the folk, who are not written much about these days. If you don't know them already, read this!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2001

    The Moor Child a Book that is Far From Boring

    The Moor Child is a book for children ages 9-12 it is about a changeling which is a creature that is half pixie half human. She is swiched with a black smiths daughter.Her ma's ma Old Bess has her suspicions about the child and she is right. Saaski the changeling meets a boy named Tam and they become friends. All the kids in her village make fun of her they call her 'freaky-odd'.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2001

    Tremendous...and perhaps not entirely fiction?

    This book was great. Really really great!! I'm still talking about it a week after getting it out of the library. I am hoping a sequel will be coming out soon, and if not, I'm writing one myself! I highly recommend it...and for anyone who feels it hit a little closer to home, please check out 'Otherkin' in any search engine. A really fantastic, well-written book with a few surprises, leaving more at the end...just WHAT is Tam anyway? ^_^

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2001

    okay book

    This book was kind of slow or maybe it was just me.When i started to read the first page of this book, i just got hooked and then it got boring again but then it got interesting again.I recommend this book to people ages 9-11.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2001

    Good Book

    This book was pretty good, it took quite a while to read but that might have been just me. It was a unique and interesting story. I recommend this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2001

    Great Book

    I would just to say how much I love this book. I read it a few years ago over the summer, and it stuck with me all this time. It is a very good book, and an intriguing story. Buy it, and read

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