Moral Markets: How Knowledge and Affluence Change Consumers and Products

Moral Markets: How Knowledge and Affluence Change Consumers and Products

by Nico Stehr
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1594514569

ISBN-13: 9781594514562

Pub. Date: 09/28/2007

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Market theories still widely in use today emerged in a society that no longer exists. Consumers were hardly in evidence at all in early theories of the market. Today, growing affluence, greater knowledge, and high-speed communication among consumers build into the marketplace notions of fairness, solidarity, environment, health, and political considerations imbued

Overview

Market theories still widely in use today emerged in a society that no longer exists. Consumers were hardly in evidence at all in early theories of the market. Today, growing affluence, greater knowledge, and high-speed communication among consumers build into the marketplace notions of fairness, solidarity, environment, health, and political considerations imbued with a long-term perspective that can disrupt short-term pursuits of the best buy. Importantly, such social goals, individual apprehensions, and modes of consumer conduct become inscribed today in products and services offered in the marketplace as well as in the rules and regulations that govern market relations.

About the Author:
Nico Stehr is Karl Mannheim Professor of Cultural Studies at the Zeppelin University, Friedrichshafen, Germany

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594514562
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
09/28/2007
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

"Nico Stehr has written the most interesting book on the sociology of markets in recent times, one that deserves a wide audience across the humanities and social sciences. To those for whom society is a defunct idea, Stehr counters with an account of consumers in affluent societies as capable of bending the market to their collective will in ways that enable them to exercise the sort of power that in the past would have been treated as 'political.' The book provides us with everything we need to decide whether this is a good or bad development. In any case, Stehr has succeeded in restoring a sociologically robust conception of the market."

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