The Moral Self: Building a Better Paradigm

Overview

This follow-up to The Moral Domain carries forward the exploration of new ways of modeling moral behavior. Whereas the first volume emphasized the work of Lawrence Kohlberg and the tradition of cognitive development, The Moral Self presents a paradigm that also incorporates noncognitive structures of selfhood. The concerns of the sixteen essays include the diversity of moral outlooks, the dynamics of creating a moral self, cognitive and noncognitive prerequisites of the psychological-development of autonomy and ...

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Overview

This follow-up to The Moral Domain carries forward the exploration of new ways of modeling moral behavior. Whereas the first volume emphasized the work of Lawrence Kohlberg and the tradition of cognitive development, The Moral Self presents a paradigm that also incorporates noncognitive structures of selfhood. The concerns of the sixteen essays include the diversity of moral outlooks, the dynamics of creating a moral self, cognitive and noncognitive prerequisites of the psychological-development of autonomy and moral competence, and motivation and moral personality. Gil G. Noam is Director of the Hall-Mercer Laboratory of Developmental Psychology andDevelopmental Psychopathology at Harvard Medical School. Thomas Wren is Professor of Philosophy atLoyola University of Chicago.Contributors: Part I. Conceptual Foundations. Harry Frankfurt. AmélieOksenberg Rorty. Ernst Tugendhat. Ernest S. Wolf. Thomas Wren. Part II. Building a New Paradigm.

Augusto Blasi. Anne Colby and William Damon. Helen Haste. Mordecai Nisan. Gil G. Noam. Larry Nucci and John Lee. Part III. Empirical Investigation. Monika. Keller and Wolfgang Edelstein. LotharKrappmann. Leo Montada. Gertrud Nunner-Winkler. Ervin Staub.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A follow up to The Moral Domain: Essays in the Ongoing Discussion between Philosophy and the Social Science (1990), this volume carries forward the effort to arrive at a useful psychological paradigm for moral behavior. The essays collected here address such questions as what it takes to be good, why ideals are necessary, the nature and development of moral motivation and of the moral self, and threats to moral selfhood and behavior from peers and other external forces. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Gil G. Noam is Director of the Hall-Mercer Laboratory of Developmental Psychology andDevelopmental Psychopathology at Harvard Medical School.

Thomas E. Wren is Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University of Chicago.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Building a Better Paradigm
The Role of Identity in the Constitution of Morality 3
On the Necessity of Ideals 16
What It Takes to Be Good 28
Self, Idealization, and the Development of Values 56
The Open-Textured Concepts of Morality and the Self 78
The Development of Identity: Some Implications for Moral Functioning 99
Morality and Personal Autonomy 123
The Uniting of Self and Morality in the Development of Extraordinary Moral Commitment 149
Morality, Self, and Sociohistorical Context: The Role of Lay Social Theory 175
"Normative Vulnerabilities" of Self and Their Transformations in Moral Action 209
Balanced Identity: Morality and Other Identity Values 239
The Growth of Moral Motivation 269
Understanding Oughts by Assessing Moral Reasoning or Moral Emotions 292
The Development of the Moral Self from Childhood to Adolescence 310
Individual and Group Selves: Motivation, Morality, and Evolution 337
Threats to the Self in the Peer World: Observations of Twelve-Year-Old Children in Natural Settings 359
Contributors 383
Index 387
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