More Liberty Means Less Government: Our Founders Knew This Well

Overview

In this collection of thoughtful, hard-hitting essays, Walter E. Williams once again takes on the left wing's most sacred cows with provocative insights, brutal candor, and an uncompromising reverence for personal liberty and the principles laid out in our Declaration of Independence and Constitution.
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More Liberty Means Less Government: Our Founders Knew This Well

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Overview

In this collection of thoughtful, hard-hitting essays, Walter E. Williams once again takes on the left wing's most sacred cows with provocative insights, brutal candor, and an uncompromising reverence for personal liberty and the principles laid out in our Declaration of Independence and Constitution.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780817996123
  • Publisher: Hoover Institution Press
  • Publication date: 3/28/1999
  • Series: Publication Series
  • Pages: 264
  • Sales rank: 483,511
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Walter E. Williams is the John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics at George Mason University and a nationally syndicated columnist. He is the author of several books and more than sixty articles that have appeared in such scholarly journals such as Economic Inquiry, American Economic Review, and Social Science Quarterly and popular publications such as Reader's Digest, Regulation, Policy Review, and Newsweek.
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2002

    Right, as usual!

    As usual, Walter Williams, one of the truly great economists of our time, is precisely right in his assessment of the relationship between government and freedom.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2001

    A Great Start for Students

    More Liberty Means Less Government is a collection of Professor Walter E. Williams¿ essays in which he evaluates a range of civil liberty topics. These essays originally appeared in Williams¿ weekly column between January 3, 1995 and January 7, 1998. Williams divides these articles into seven sections: Race and Sex, Government, Education, Environment and Health, International, Law and Society, and Potpourri. Throughout this book, Williams contends that politicians needlessly sacrifice freedoms in each of these areas, whenever they empower government to regulate, administer, and enforce fortuitous policies. Williams states, ¿If there is a general theme to my columns, that theme is the attention I give to the proper role of government in a free society....¿ ¿The legitimate and moral role of government is to protect those unalienable rights to life, liberty, and property,¿ concludes Williams. While most students will find that More Liberty Means Less Government supports their study of civil liberties, the reader must not rely on Williams¿ book as a reference. Although Professor Williams is a highly qualified and widely respected authority on constitutional origins, More Liberty Means Less Government is not a scholarly work. Because his book is a collection of newspaper articles, Williams does not cite many of his sources. Most of the statistics that Williams provides are without references. Secondly, Williams¿ book has not undergone the battery of peer reviews, which validates most scholarly works. Furthermore, Professor Williams is on the board of directors for the Hoover Institution, which published this book. This is not to say that More Liberty Means Less Government is not useful for students of American government; however, students should use Williams¿ book merely as a starting point in their research of civil liberties. The task of tracing and verifying Williams¿ sources rests with each student.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2012

    great book!

    Mr. Williams has a way of explaining things in a down to earth, common sense sort of way.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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