More Light

More Light

by Primal Scream
     
 

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Primal Scream always refracted the past through the prism of the present, turning hero worship into something resembling high art. It wasn't always this way, not at the start, when they were part of the delicate, brittle C86 scene, nor was it true when they exploded in a brilliant blast of acid house on Screamadelica. The art came later, after they halted their…  See more details below

Overview

Primal Scream always refracted the past through the prism of the present, turning hero worship into something resembling high art. It wasn't always this way, not at the start, when they were part of the delicate, brittle C86 scene, nor was it true when they exploded in a brilliant blast of acid house on Screamadelica. The art came later, after they halted their ascendency via the Stones-aping Give Out But Don't Give Up, a move that in retrospect seems to be an important final foundation within the construction of Primal Scream but at the time seemed odd, halting, flying in the face of Cool Britannia. Bobby Gillespie and crew rubbed shoulders with the fellow Creation labelmates Oasis but Primal Scream never belonged to Brit-pop; they dropped out and tuned in, dabbling with radical politics, dub, and free jazz, pursuing that path until they once again acted like a rock band on Riot City Blues, an album, like Give Out, that seems like a waystation that, along with 2008's rangier Beautiful Future, feels like a necessary detour for the group to refuel. More Light flaunts all of the benefits of their recharging. It is one of those odd Primal Scream albums where they pull it all together -- roping in the hard rock, free jazz, club beats, flowery psychedelia, the worship of the Stooges, and a devotion to avant-garde cinema -- building upon the past in an attempt to get closer to the future. Their own history is not exempt from examination: they flirt with the aggro aggression of XTRMNTR and Screamadelica's "Movin' on Up" is explicitly quoted on the closer, "It's Alright, It's OK." That tune is placed at the end of the album, concluding the album on a bit of a triumphant note, a tone that's rather appropriate for More Light. Primal Scream never shy away from darkness here, either in their lyrics or music, but More Light percolates with bright, incessant inventiveness, as if they are gripped by the tantalizing possibilities of their creations, and have yet to give up on the future, despite all the bleakness that surrounds them. Occasionally, that darkness creeps into view -- "Elimination Blues," with vocals from Robert Plant, churns its groove until there seems to be no escape; "Relativity" reaches a cacophonous crescendo, never slipping back to a comfort zone -- but what sticks with More Light is that sense of adventure, how it wrestles with the future by using the rules of the past. Maybe it's a losing game -- as the years slip by, situationist politics, avant-garde art, and psychedelic pop all fade from popular consciousness -- but the brilliant thing about More Light is how it suggests that the struggle itself is empowering.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/18/2013
Label:
Ingrooves
UPC:
5060342850010
catalogNumber:
003
Rank:
57224

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Primal Scream   Primary Artist
Robert Plant   Vocals
Mark Stewart   Vocals
Marshall Allen   Alto Saxophone
Unloved   Background Vocals
Fred Adams   Trumpet
Martin Duffy   Piano,Celeste,Wurlitzer,Hammond B3
Jason Falkner   Synthesizer,Bass Guitar,Electric Guitar,6-string bass
Bobby Gillespie   Tambourine,Vocals,Background Vocals,Hand Clapping,Mellotron
Andrew Innes   Dulcimer,Synthesizer,Acoustic Guitar,Piano,Autoharp,Bass Guitar,Electric Guitar,Rhythm Guitar,12-string Guitar,Mellotron,Electric Sitar,6-string bass,Drones
Marco Nelson   Bass Guitar
Kevin Shields   Guitar
Steve Tavaglione   Alto Saxophone,Tenor Saxophone
Jay Bellerose   Drums
Woody Jackson   Guitar,Emulator
Tracy Wannomae   Alto Saxophone
Jim Hunt   Flute,Saxophone
David Henderson   Guitar
Sharlene Hector   Background Vocals
Darrin Mooney   Percussion,Drums
Barrie Cadogan   Guitar,Background Vocals
Ladonna Harley Peters   Background Vocals
Keefus Cianca   Piano,Bells
Davey Chegwidden   Percussion,Drums,Tom-Tom,Guiro
Danny Ray Thompson   Baritone Saxophone
Todd Simon   Trumpet
Noel Scott   Alto Saxophone,Tenor Saxophone
Geo Gabriel   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Mark Stewart   Composer,Whistle
Jason Falkner   Engineer
Bobby Gillespie   Composer
David Holmes   Producer,Engineer
Andrew Innes   Composer,Engineer
Sam Johnston   Engineer
Brendan Lynch   Engineer,Additional Production
David Meltzer   Composer
Nicky Brown   Vocal Arrangements
Woody Jackson   Engineer,Orchestration
Valente Torrez   Engineer
Paul Stanborough   Engineer
Chris Kasych   Pro-Tools
Eric Isip   Engineer
Michael Harris   Engineer
Masa Tsuzki   Engineer
Lee Pierce   Composer

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