More Parts

More Parts

5.0 6
by Tedd Arnold
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Give me a hand . . . hold your tongue . . . scream your lungs out . . . what's a kid to do if he wants to keep all his body parts in place? Well, one thing is for sure, he'll have to be creative. Like, if you want to keep your heart from breaking, just make sure it's well padded and protected by tying a pillow around your chest. Want to keep your hands attached?

…  See more details below

Overview

Give me a hand . . . hold your tongue . . . scream your lungs out . . . what's a kid to do if he wants to keep all his body parts in place? Well, one thing is for sure, he'll have to be creative. Like, if you want to keep your heart from breaking, just make sure it's well padded and protected by tying a pillow around your chest. Want to keep your hands attached? Simple-stick them on with gloves and lots of glue. Just be careful not to laugh your head off!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Zany, brightly colored illustrations and rhyming verse... Children will ask for it again and again. (School Library Journal)

Young readers...will warm to this neurotic young rhymester. (Kirkus Reviews)

Publishers Weekly
For fans of Parts, Tedd Arnold returns with More Parts, continuing the theme of twisted idioms that strike fear in the heart of the uninitiated child. For example, when Dad asks his son to "Please give him a hand!" the bug-eyed boy is shown holding his unhinged appendage by the thumb. (Sept.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
For one little boy expressions like "give him a hand," "stretch your arms and your legs," and "hold your tongue" conjure up images of body parts flying about willy-nilly. To keep them firmly in place he devises clever and often hilarious solutions. This will be a sure-fire hit with kids, who will giggle uncontrollably at the little boy's imaginative hysteria. Ted Arnold pulls out all the stops creating energetic and zany illustration that give new meaning to these common figures of speech. The bug-eyed boy and the hand-lettered text impart a child-like quality to this rib-tickling treat. Read it once and kids will beg you to read it again. 2001, Dial, $15.99. Ages 7 to 10. Reviewer:Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-Through zany, brightly colored illustrations and rhyming verse, Arnold explores common figures of speech that amaze and frighten a young boy. "I'll bet that broke your heart," "give him a hand," "Hold your tongue," and "jumps out of his skin" are only a few of the sayings that worry the protagonist, whose imaginings are energetically depicted in colored-pencil and watercolor washes. Goofy, cartoonlike artwork explores the deepest recesses of the child's overwrought and overworked imagination. Kids will love faces cracking, lungs being coughed up, and bodies flying apart. Vivid color and a robust artistic style will attract younger children who may not get the joke, but older children and parents will. Singsong verses in hand-lettered text strain to rhyme in some instances, with a forced, uneven gait. Although the boy's parents reassure him, the story ends where it begins. The father, who "didn't mean to be unkind," tells the child that they were afraid that he'd lost his mind. The final drawing has the boy's brain falling out of his head and onto the floor. This story is like a wild and crazy, totally manic Amelia Bedelia. Children will ask for it again and again.-Alice Casey Smith, Sayreville Public Schools, Parlin, NJ Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The literal-minded lad who worried so hilariously about losing his Parts (1997) returns for a series of anxiety-inducing encounters with figures of speech. What exactly do people mean by asking him to lend a hand, promising that a joke will crack him up, or telling him to stretch his arms and legs? How, exactly, is he supposed to hold his tongue? Does a friend's baby sister really cry her lungs out every night? In Arnold's cartoony illustrations, the pop-eyed narrator envisions the disastrous results of taking these expressions at face value, then proceeds to strap, wrap, and glue himself up, just to be safe. The gross-out factor is toned down for this sequel, but young readers who find Amelia Bedelia a trifle too self-possessed will warm to this neurotic young rhymester. (Picture book. 6-8)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142501498
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
10/13/2003
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
86,581
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.13(d)
Lexile:
NP (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Zany, brightly colored illustrations and rhyming verse... Children will ask for it again and again. (School Library Journal)

Young readers...will warm to this neurotic young rhymester. (Kirkus Reviews)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

More Parts 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hilarious! A fun introduction to idioms for younger children.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love this book because it tells how children can take what you say literally. Even when you mean something else. This child acts like any little kid would when you say something like stretch your arms and legs they really think that you are going to make your arms and legs longer. I love this book I recommend it to anyone with children.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book used several daily conversation to introduce different body parts (e.g. 'Could you lend me you HAND?'). It's very funny and all ages will enjoy it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I like Tedd Arnolds books because each story is so comical. It's really genius, in fact I am inspired to write childrens books myself! Its a light-hearted sincere read for the kid in anybody. Go get it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked up this book because of the clever illustration, then became pleasantly surprised with the story. Fun to read about little ones who take words literally. Fun to share over and over. Great read for a class full of kids or quick read with families. Share this one with everyone, all ages will enjoy!