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More Technology for the Rest of Us: A Second Primer on Computing for the Non-IT Librarian

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Overview

From cloud computing to data curation to open-source software, the world of technology offers great opportunity—and potential frustration. Nancy Courtney and her team of IT experts have set out to enhance the former and alleviate the latter. More Technology for the Rest of Us: A Second Primer on Computing for the Non-IT Librarian follows up on Courtney's 2005 technology volume by tackling the most recent advances in IT. Each chapter describes a technology important to the library field, explains how it works in terms a non-IT professional can understand, and describes its uses.

The essays in More Technology for the Rest of Us are not meant to make readers experts, but to provide a basic introduction to some of the current technologies impacting libraries and their patrons. Articles are brief and clearly written, and computer jargon is defined and explained. Each chapter lists references for further information, and there is a selected bibliography and glossary at the end of the book.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Utilizing many screen captures as examples, this book is a one-stop resource for gaining a basic overview of topics such as Web services, digital data preservation and curation, cloud computing, learning management systems, content management systems, metadata repurposing using XSLT, and more. The articles are sufficiently nontechnical to be suitable for a non-IT librarian but do require enough tech savvy to understand basic terms and concepts."

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Booklist

"Helpful in recognizing how these aspects operate on a regular basis. Librarians are given effective communication tips when dealing with the IT department…different authors cover each chapter thoroughly."

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Library Media Connection

VOYA - Megan Lynn Isaac
Despite the title of this volume, non-IT readers are likely to find themselves overwhelmed by the barrage of terms and acronyms that pepper this collection of eleven essays. Some chapters, like Maureen P. Walsh's "Metadata Repurposing Using XSLT," are nearly incomprehensible to the technological novice, as when she defines the transformation language XLST by explaining, "The XSL family is made up of XSL Transformations (XSLT), XML Path Language (XPath) and XSL Formatting Objects (XSL-FO)" (p. 143). Other authors, like Christopher Strauber, Frances Rice, and Ardys Kozbial, provide relatively accessible explanations of terms like "cloud computing," "content management systems," and "digital preservation systems," respectively, enabling a reader to understand what issues might be at stake for a librarian within each one. A few of the articles provide practical advice that a non-IT librarian might be called upon to use, like Steve McCann's discussion of data visualization and explanations of how to present data with both intellectual and aesthetic efficiency, or Scot Colford's discussion of the differences between free and open-source software versus proprietary software that might enable a reader to participate in discussions when libraries are considering system design or institutional purchases. For genuine beginners, librarians dealing with small collections, or media professionals mostly interested in working with patrons, this collection, authored primarily by university librarians considering issues relevant to large systems, is less than essential. Reviewer: Megan Lynn Isaac
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781591589396
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/26/2010
  • Pages: 172
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction Nancy Courtney vii

1 Web Services Jason A. Clark 1

2 Digital Data Preservation and Curation H. Frank Cervone 15

3 Cloud Computing: Distributed Power, Remote Storage, and Web Services Christopher Strauber 31

4 Learning Management Systems Kim Duckett 41

5 Authentication and Authorization in Libraries David Kennedy 55

6 Content Management Systems Frances Rice 67

7 Data Visualization Steve McCann 81

8 Sorting through Digital Preservation Systems Ardys Kozbial 95

9 Free and Open Source Software Scot Colford 109

10 Metadata Repurposing Using XSLT Maureen P. Walsh 125

11 Communicating Effectively with IT Elizabeth L. Black 141

Glossary Hector Escobar 157

Index 167

About the Editor and Contributors 169

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