More Than It Hurts You: A Novel [NOOK Book]

Overview

Read Darin Strauss's posts on the Penguin Blog



Josh Goldin's happy yet unexamined existence is shattered one morning when his wife, Dori, rushes their eight-month-
...
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More Than It Hurts You: A Novel

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Overview

Read Darin Strauss's posts on the Penguin Blog



Josh Goldin's happy yet unexamined existence is shattered one morning when his wife, Dori, rushes their eight-month-
old son to the emergency room in severe distress. Dr. Darlene Stokes, an African-American physician and single
mother, suspects Munchausen by proxy, a rarely diagnosed and controversial phenomenon where a mother
intentionally harms her baby. As each of them is forced to confront a reality that has become a nightmare, Darlene,
Dori, and Josh are pushed to their breaking points.

Darin Strauss's extraordinary novel is set in a world
turned upside down-where doctors try to save babies from their parents, police use the law to tear families apart, and
the people you think you know best end up surprising you the most.


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Editorial Reviews

Ron Charles
If you don't belong to a book club, Darin Strauss's bitter and brilliant new novel is reason enough to start one. You can always disband afterward, and in any case your discussion of More Than It Hurts You may be so heated that you'll never talk to those people again. Strauss has packed this gripping story with the whole radio dial of divisive, hot-button issues…Strauss made a name for himself with two historical novels based on real celebrities: Chang and Eng (2000), about the original Siamese twins, and The Real McCoy (2002), about a boxer at the turn of the last century. This time around, with an extraordinary degree of breadth and confidence, he's moved to a hyper-contemporary setting and invented his own characters.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly

Strauss's third novel is the story of three ordinary individuals whose paths interconnect in extraordinary ways. Arthur Morey's exquisite performance brings those characters and many others to life in a believable and honest manner. His slight shifts in dialect are subtle yet flawless; his pacing is steady and allows the story to unfold nicely. There is an underlying sense of urgency and panic in each of Strauss's characters, and Morey allows it to sharpen his reading without going overwhelming it. Ultimately, listeners will be enthralled by the touching stories Strauss offers here, but Morey goes one step further and manages to bring the stories to vivid life. A Dutton hardcover (Reviews, Jan. 7). (June)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

In Strauss's (Chang and Eng) third novel, TV airtime salesman Josh Goldin learns that his wife, Dori, has just taken their eight-month-old son, Zach, to the emergency room. This sets off a series of events that eventually forces Josh to question the state of medical care, the legal system, and his wife's sanity. When Zach is treated a second time for mysterious, life-threatening symptoms, head pediatrician Darlene Graves becomes suspicious and calls in Child Protective Services (CPS). Suddenly, the Goldins' suburban Long Island lives are made difficult by visits from the CPS investigator, and Darlene's life, too, becomes stressful as a newspaper reporter attacks her for going after innocent people and her long-lost father, a former prison inmate, suddenly turns up wanting to build a relationship. Ultimately, it is Josh who finds himself most conflicted, caught between his love for his wife and the mounting evidence that Dori might, in fact, be harming their son. The narrative switches from medical to psychological to courtroom drama as each character is gradually forced to face his or her own reality. Highly recommended. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 2/1/08.]—Joshua Cohen, Mid-Hudson Lib. Syst., Poughkeepsie, NY

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781440633560
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 6/19/2008
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 351,905
  • File size: 540 KB

Meet the Author

Darin Strauss
Darin Strauss is the award-winning author of the national and international bestseller Chang and Eng, as well as its screenplay for Disney Films and director Julie Taymor.  His work has been translated into 14 languages and he teaches at New York University and lives in Brooklyn, New York.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 30 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 7, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    a gifted writer

    Darin Strauss is a gifted writer who can describe events and feelings in ways that I have never thought of before. He worked very hard in order to make sure that the reader fully understood each character and his/her motivations. That said, sometimes the details bordered on the tedious(especially in reference to Josh's job and the world of big-time advertising) and I just wanted to get back to the story at hand. There are many shades of gray with each character and no good vs evil story here. Unfortunately, I didn't particularly like any of the characters. Although, I would say the book is well worth reading it is probably not for the more casual reader who likes their books more "plot-driven" than "character-driven".

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2008

    Not what I expected

    I read this entire book but had to force myself through it after the first few chapters. I agree that the author spent too much time describing people and places time that should have been used to develop the underlying story more fully. At one point I thought some other book was mistakenly included in my printed copy! The premise was promising but the book disappointing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 22, 2011

    More than it hurts you

    This book moved very slow at a number of times and then ending left a lot to be desired.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2009

    Good Read

    I liked this book alot. I always couldn't wait to get back to it. It was true to form. I have to admit I was a little disappointed in the ending. I guess that it does happen that way too.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2008

    Great book -- best of the year

    I loved this book. It's an incredibly powerful story, exceptionally told. My whole book club loved this one. I highly recommend it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2008

    'Rage, that devoted propagandist, airbrushes memory whenever it can.'

    Darin Strauss in this, his third novel ('Chang and Eng', 'The Real McCoy'), permanently secures his position as one of America's finest novelists. The sheer variety of his choices of stories, his elegant ability as a wordsmith, and the fervor with which he approaches difficult issues within the context of creating a fascinating story are only a few of the reasons for his success. Strauss has the gift to create unique characters, develop them thoroughly and gradually throughout the weaving of his tale, and leave the reader with a high degree of concern about the future of these people long after the lat page of his novels are complete. Always electing to introduce rarely known information as a key to his works, MORE THAN IT HURTS YOU explores the definition and significance of the mysterious phenomenon Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy (or MSP - the 'DSM-4 factitious disorder by proxy'). It is important to the author that the reader understand this complex entity: according to the dictionary it is defined as follows: 'Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSP), a type of factitious disorder, is a mental illness in which a person acts as if an individual he or she is caring for has a physical or mental illness when the person is not really sick. People with MSP assume the role of a sick person indirectly by producing or lying about illness in another person under their care, usually a child under 6 years of age. (The term 'by proxy' means 'through a substitute.') People with MSP have an inner need for the other person (often his or her child) to be seen as ill or injured. It is not done to achieve a concrete benefit, such as financial gain. People with MSP are even willing to have the child or other patient undergo painful or risky tests and operations in order to get the sympathy and special attention given to people who are truly ill and their families. Factitious disorders are considered mental illnesses because they are associated with severe emotional difficulties'. Strauss very subtly investigates this syndrome through his creation of a happy family - Josh and Dori Golding and their infant son Zack. Josh is a well-liked, creative salesman for the television network Sparkplug, while Dori is a trained nurse/phlebotomist whose devotion to her family is exemplary. As Josh's attention to new work developments strays from his family focus, Dori rushes Zack to the hospital for gastric pain and subsequently for hematemesis and there is 'treated' the Pediatric ER doctor Darlene Stokes and her intern. Dr. Stokes fails to do certain blood screening tests and Dori accuses her of mismanagement. Zack of course recovers (we later learn that Dori has placed blood in Zack's emesis to begin the Munchhausen Syndrome by Proxy process) and the race between patient/parents and physician/hospital is on. Each of the characters reflects backgrounds that make them 'persons of interest': Darlene was the illegitimate child of a young African American woman, impregnated by one Charles Stokes, a drug dealer who is imprisoned where he changes his religion to Muslim and his name to Intelligent Muhammad. From this rather lowly background Darlene rises above her white classmates, elects to affiliate with her black brethren in housing and activities, becomes a physician, has a brief affair with the first man who pays attention to her (a Caucasian Jew), becomes pregnant, marries, has a child she names James, and when her husband dies, centers her life on her career, her son, and her single mother Alice. Josh Goldin is Jewish as is Dori, a girl of Turkish descent. As the accusation of Munchausen's Syndrome is made against Dori, the Goldin's seek advice from a haughty Jewish lawyer who manufactures concepts that Darlene has vindictive feelings against the Jewish Goldins (racism) and causes the Goldin's to believe his case against '

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2008

    Lost

    I cannot just read this book. I find myself going back and rereading and rereading, trying to figure out if I missed something or if this is just an awful book... It really is just a boring book, terribly written by the author.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2008

    Couldn't Pick it Up!

    I was so disappointed in this book. I'm the type of person who reads while I eat, cook, clean, etc., but this book was hard to keep open. I didn't 'get' any of the characters and felt the author was more in love with his alliterations, descriptions, etc. than trying to grab the reader with the poignancy of what could have been a great book. Sorry, but this author is not on my list of must reads.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2008

    Good book

    I liked the plot, the character development and I did care for the people in the book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2008

    Couldn't put it down

    I was immediately drawn into this story in the first pages and devoured the book in one day. Much has been written about the disease Munchhausen by proxy but this is the first time I have read a book that includes the thoughts of the person purported to have the mental illness. I thought the book was well-written. It included the perspectives of the involved spouse of the guilty party, the accusing doctor as well as her peers at the hospital and the thoughts toward the accusing doctor from her own family. Engrossing read ... you will love it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2008

    A reviewer

    This book is everything that current fiction should be, and so seldom is. It's bold, it's ambitious, and it takes a riveting, realistic plot and uses it to make larger critiques about the society we live in. It has the pace of a thriller, but its author's perceptive insights build sympathy even for the villains of the piece. As someone who worked in publishing many years ago, I can tell you that this is the sort of book I was always looking for, and rarely found. As a constant reader today, I can tell you it is a joy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2008

    Very disappointing

    This book was nothing like I expected. There were way too many tangents and not enough focus on the 'Munchausen by proxy' story line.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2008

    Boring

    The plot seems interesting until you actually begin to read it. I was only about twenty pages in when I stopped reading because I was so bored. I eventually picked it back up to finish, and I still couldn't get into it. It seems the author tried to make the characters more complex and instead added a lot of inane details that did nothing for the story. I forced myself to finish it but I don't recommend this one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2008

    Bland, clueless characters

    I tried to become interested in Dori and Josh and the baby, but I just didn't care about any of them. I didn't care whether she was suffering from MBPS or not. I found them to be your average, boring, 'I'm entitled' couple. Strauss does such a good job portraying them as such that it's a bit of a put-off and doesn't really help you connect with them (unless you, too, possibly feel boring and entitled). I found the background story of Dr. Stokes much more interesting and would have rather read a whole novel about her and her son.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2008

    More Than It Hurts You

    In Long Island Josh Goldin loves his wife Dori and their eight month old son Zack. However, the TV salesman is very worried about Zack who twice has been rushed to the emergency room with strange life-threatening symptoms. African-American ICU pediatric chief Dr. Darlene Stokes reports the Goldin case to the Child Protective Services her theory is that Zack¿s mom suffers from Munchausen syndrome, which causes her to inflict harm to her child in an attempt to draw attention to herself and her family.------------- CPS decides to take Zack away from his white Jewish parents who challenge the government agency in court. The public is divided between parental rights and children protection as the case is not quite as black and white as the two sides pretend it to be.----------------- Extremely timely with the Texas Child Protective Services-Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints incident and the media sell out to the Pentagon, Darin Strauss slices and dices the new American economy in which everything is for sale especially health (you may not be able to buy health unless your Cheney, but many Americans cannot afford anything but illness and death). Whether it is a hospital bed, a news report or a politician, the price is right. At times the powerful satirical elements overwhelm the basic social issue of parental rights vs. professional opinion re the welfare of a child as everyone is stereotyped to lampoon some aspect of society. Darin Strauss carves up Bush¿s American dream asserting that for many it is more a nightmare.---------- Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    More Than It Hurts You

    In Long Island Josh Goldin loves his wife Dori and their eight month old son Zack. However, the TV salesman is very worried about Zack who twice has been rushed to the emergency room with strange life-threatening symptoms. African-American ICU pediatric chief Dr. Darlene Stokes reports the Goldin case to the Child Protective Services her theory is that Zack¿s mom suffers from Munchausen syndrome, which causes her to inflict harm to her child in an attempt to draw attention to herself and her family.------------ CPS decides to take Zack away from his white Jewish parents who challenge the government agency in court. The public is divided between parental rights and children protection as the case is not quite as black and white as the two sides pretend it to be.---------- Extremely timely with the Texas Child Protective Services-Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints incident and the media sell out to the Pentagon, Darin Strauss slices and dices the new American economy in which everything is for sale especially health (you may not be able to buy health unless your Cheney, but many Americans cannot afford anything but illness and death). Whether it is a hospital bed, a news report or a politician, the price is right. At times the powerful satirical elements overwhelm the basic social issue of parental rights vs. professional opinion re the welfare of a child as everyone is stereotyped to lampoon some aspect of society. Darin Strauss carves up Bush¿s American dream asserting that for many it is more a nightmare.------------ Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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