BN.com Gift Guide

More than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City

Overview

"More Than Just Race is a refreshing and controversial contribution to the American discourse about the persistence of racial divisions. We are used to hearing conservatives decry African American culture's failure to promote success in black communities and seeing liberals point to the institutional racism that pervades American political and social structures. Preeminent sociologist William Julius Wilson cuts through the usual arguments to chart a third path." "In More Than Just Race, Wilson addresses head-on the three most pressing racially
... See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (24) from $3.74   
  • New (8) from $12.53   
  • Used (16) from $3.74   
More than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City (Issues of Our Time)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 34%)$15.95 List Price

Overview

"More Than Just Race is a refreshing and controversial contribution to the American discourse about the persistence of racial divisions. We are used to hearing conservatives decry African American culture's failure to promote success in black communities and seeing liberals point to the institutional racism that pervades American political and social structures. Preeminent sociologist William Julius Wilson cuts through the usual arguments to chart a third path." "In More Than Just Race, Wilson addresses head-on the three most pressing racially charged problems currently facing America: the persistence of the inner-city ghetto, the plight of low-skilled black males, and the fragmentation of the African American family. Looking carefully at the history and current state of these problems, Wilson reveals the broader social and economic contexts that create and perpetuate them, demonstrating that the same forces of global and national change that have affected all Americans have hit vulnerable inner-city black communities particularly hard. The result is unrectified racial inequality and a polarized and confused national discourse on race." Hewing scrupulously to the evidence and rejecting both conservative and liberal dogma, Wilson analyzes the state of race in America in the insightful and thorough manner that characterizes his long and distinguished career. Neither the structural nor the cultural approach suffices to fully explain the way in which race operates in America; by integrating the two approaches in a creative explanatory framework, Wilson seeks to open the floor to a more frank and honest discussion. More than Just Race is a measured and persuasive case for reframingthe way we look at and talk about race.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Richard Thompson Ford
More Than Just Race is somewhat ponderous and academic in style; too often the book details an important and fascinating question only to end inconclusively, with a call for "further research." But this is more than made up for by its considerable substantive virtues: it is straightforward, accessible and sensible, free of the ideological cant and posturing that often mar even serious academic studies of racial issues.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly

Harvard sociologist Wilson (The Declining Significance of Race) makes a bold effort to reframe current debates on the relationship between race and poverty in the U.S. The author observes that discussions of race have hardened into two mutually exclusive and inflexible perspectives. One view regards black poverty as a consequence of social forces-e.g., segregation and the flight of middle-class black residents from urban centers. Alternately, black poverty has been portrayed as a product of individual and cultural inadequacy. Wilson argues for perspectives that acknowledge the inherent symbiosis of social and cultural forces. For example, cultural concerns about black violence in the 1970s gave rise to a more punitive response to street crime leading to greatly increased incarceration rates for black men. Employers' unwillingness to hire black ex-felons, coupled with the rise of service jobs that favor women, led to the decline of the traditional male provider role that had sustained long-term family commitments. Wilson combines a critical look at recent research on poverty and race with his own field research to construct a synthesis that sidesteps many of the pitfalls that often entrap race and poverty theorists. (Mar.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Kirkus Reviews
A refreshing, multilayered study of racial inequality in America..Wilson (Sociology/Harvard; There Goes the Neighborhood: Racial, Ethnic and Class Tensions in Four Chicago Neighborhoods and Their Meaning for America, 2006, etc.) adopts a controversial method, outlining not only the institutional factors that perpetuate inequity and poverty, but also the cultural factors, which have often been overlooked by academics "because of a fear that such analysis can be construed as ‘blaming the victim.' " Using this framework, Wilson dismantles the current ideology surrounding the understanding of three fractious topics: concentrated poverty, the economic plight of inner-city black males and the breakdown of the black family. "The Forces Shaping Concentrated Poverty," perhaps the most damning chapter, outlines the initiatives that served to institutionalize inequality in America, with particular emphasis on housing and transportation. Readers who prefer their percentages and policy critique cloaked in flowery language and anecdotal case studies would be well advised to look elsewhere; Wilson's strict syntax of statistics and acronyms readily evokes the bleakness of the landscape he describes. Cultural factors are most prominent in "The Fragmentation of the Poor Black Family." One of its most fascinating passages resurrects the "prophetic" Moynihan report, a landmark 1976 survey on race and family structure that was originally lambasted for its inclusion of cultural evidence. Situating the report both contextually and academically, the author extracts relevant aspects of Moynihan's research as he simultaneously traces the course of sociological methodology. Wilson's strength lies in hisability to see beyond the culture-versus-structure argument at the center of the discussion of race and poverty in America. This allows him, for example, to illustrate the enduring effects of such seemingly unconnected factors as globalization and "cool-pose culture" on employment among young black males..Reshapes the frame through which race and poverty are viewed.
New York Times Book Review
“Straightforward, accessible and sensible, free of . . . ideological cant and posturing.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393067057
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/9/2009
  • Series: Issues of Our Time Series
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 690,384
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

William Julius Wilson is a University Professor at Harvard University, president emeritus of the American Sociological Association, and the author of numerous books, including the award-winning The Declining Significance of Race and When Work Disappears. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Structural and cultural forces that contribute to racial inequality 1

Ch. 2 The forces shaping concentrated poverty 25

Ch. 3 The economic plight of inner-city black males 62

Ch. 4 The fragmentation of the poor black family 95

Ch. 5 Framing the issues : uniting structure and culture 133

Notes 156

Index 177

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 11, 2009

    Not as Good as Expected

    Living in Chicago, I could have written most of this book without any research. I expected a more research based book. It was ok - but nothing new.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A must read for serious race conscious people

    Dr. Wilson, deals with a topic many people only ignore. As a talk show host I constantly strain my intellectual capacity to understand the nonsense my Black callers express about social, economic and political issues. It's let's protect the criminal and damn the victim. the criminal did the crime because he was poor, uneducated, and had no father. The logic totally befuddles others and myself as we try to compute the logic.

    I ask the question which lead me to this book is it Race or Culture that holds Black Americans back?

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)